[SOLVED] My first PC build. HELP!

Sep 12, 2019
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Hi guys I've always wanted to build my own PC since 5 years and now I am finally able to afford it. However this is my first build so I don't really know what is good or not. So far this is what I have chosen:
  • CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor (£109.00)
  • CPU cooler: be quiet! Pure Rock Slim 35.14 CFM CPU Cooler (£19.99)
  • Motherboard: MSI B450M GAMING PLUS Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard (£77.99)
  • Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory (£84.09)
  • Storage: Seagate BarraCuda 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£35.13) Kingston A400 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive (£29.59)
  • Video card: MSI Radeon RX 580 8 GB ARMOR OC Video Card (£186.96)
  • Case: Sahara P35 ATX Mid Tower Case [comes with 4 fans] (£55.47)
  • Powersupply: Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply (£64.97)
  • Operating system: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit (£93.99)
  • Monitor: HP 25x Full HD 24.5" LCD Gaming Monitor - Black (£219)
  • Keyboard: Mad Catz S.T.R.I.K.E. TE Wired Gaming Keyboard (£29.99)
  • Mouse: Mad Catz R.A.T.1 Wired Optical Mouse (£22.18)
Altogether it is £1010.34 and I will be buying the parts gradually. Please give your opinions and advice if this is good or If I should make any changes. Also I am buying from pc partpicker.
 

WildCard999

Titan
Herald
Much faster storage, better GPU & better aftermarket cooler for a little bit more.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor (£109.00 @ Amazon UK)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler (£30.60 @ Amazon UK)
Motherboard: ASRock B450M Pro4-F Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard (£65.98 @ Amazon UK)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory (£84.09 @ Amazon UK)
Storage: Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive (£97.97 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB GAMING Video Card (£209.99 @ Amazon UK)
Case: Fractal Design Focus G Mini MicroATX Mini Tower Case (£50.47 @ Amazon UK)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply (£64.97 @ Laptops Direct)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit (£83.00 @ Amazon UK)
Monitor: AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor (£172.98 @ Amazon UK)
Keyboard: Mad Catz S.T.R.I.K.E. TE Wired Gaming Keyboard (£29.99 @ Amazon UK)
Mouse: Mad Catz R.A.T.1 Wired Optical Mouse (£22.16 @ Amazon UK)
Total: £1021.20
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-12 14:01 BST+0100
 
Reactions: AngelTech

WildCard999

Titan
Herald
Much faster storage, better GPU & better aftermarket cooler for a little bit more.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor (£109.00 @ Amazon UK)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler (£30.60 @ Amazon UK)
Motherboard: ASRock B450M Pro4-F Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard (£65.98 @ Amazon UK)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory (£84.09 @ Amazon UK)
Storage: Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive (£97.97 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB GAMING Video Card (£209.99 @ Amazon UK)
Case: Fractal Design Focus G Mini MicroATX Mini Tower Case (£50.47 @ Amazon UK)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply (£64.97 @ Laptops Direct)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit (£83.00 @ Amazon UK)
Monitor: AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor (£172.98 @ Amazon UK)
Keyboard: Mad Catz S.T.R.I.K.E. TE Wired Gaming Keyboard (£29.99 @ Amazon UK)
Mouse: Mad Catz R.A.T.1 Wired Optical Mouse (£22.16 @ Amazon UK)
Total: £1021.20
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-12 14:01 BST+0100
 
Reactions: AngelTech

AngelTech

Commendable
May 18, 2019
1,297
194
1,240
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AMD CPUs come with a fan so no need for an aftermarket cooler unless you plan to overclock, I'd personally spend abit more on mouse and keyboard but that's just my preference you can get a nice monitor a bit cheaper this one.
 
I wouldn't advise getting the parts gradually. It'll cost the same either way. So, save up until you can buy it all at once.
  • Part availability and pricing changes over time. So, you're build will constantly be changing.
  • Many of the parts you'll have no way of testing. It would be horrible when you finally have all the parts needed to use something like the CPU or motherboard. Only to find out it is defective and beyond the return window. Forcing you to wait out a long RMA process.
  • The parts you want to use but can't will just be sitting there taunting you.
  • It'll also be frustrating when you finally have all the parts. To realize that if you waited until that time to get everything at once. You may have been able to get a Vega 64, 1TB SSD and/or Ryzen 3600 instead.
With that being said. The build is solid but the HDD will make it feel slow. @WildCard999 build is much nicer.
 
Sep 12, 2019
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thanks for the reply, I'll definitely use this build but with the storage I read online its good to have both SSD and a HDD or is it ok to have just the SSD?
Much faster storage, better GPU & better aftermarket cooler for a little bit more.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor (£109.00 @ Amazon UK)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler (£30.60 @ Amazon UK)
Motherboard: ASRock B450M Pro4-F Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard (£65.98 @ Amazon UK)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory (£84.09 @ Amazon UK)
Storage: Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive (£97.97 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB GAMING Video Card (£209.99 @ Amazon UK)
Case: Fractal Design Focus G Mini MicroATX Mini Tower Case (£50.47 @ Amazon UK)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply (£64.97 @ Laptops Direct)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit (£83.00 @ Amazon UK)
Monitor: AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor (£172.98 @ Amazon UK)
Keyboard: Mad Catz S.T.R.I.K.E. TE Wired Gaming Keyboard (£29.99 @ Amazon UK)
Mouse: Mad Catz R.A.T.1 Wired Optical Mouse (£22.16 @ Amazon UK)
Total: £1021.20
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-12 14:01 BST+0100
 
Sep 12, 2019
7
0
10
0
I wouldn't advise getting the parts gradually. It'll cost the same either way. So, save up until you can buy it all at once.
  • Part availability and pricing changes over time. So, you're build will constantly be changing.
  • Many of the parts you'll have no way of testing. It would be horrible when you finally have all the parts needed to use something like the CPU or motherboard. Only to find out it is defective and beyond the return window. Forcing you to wait out a long RMA process.
  • The parts you want to use but can't will just be sitting there taunting you.
  • It'll also be frustrating when you finally have all the parts. To realize that if you waited until that time to get everything at once. You may have been able to get a Vega 64, 1TB SSD and/or Ryzen 3600 instead.
With that being said. The build is solid but the HDD will make it feel slow. @WildCard999 build is much nicer.
your right, I'll probably save up altogether.
 
Sep 12, 2019
7
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It depends on your storage needs, for over 1-2TB of storage required I'd probably add in a HDD but for under 1TB (at least for now) then I'd just go SSD.
Also the case you listed above is It a suggestion or do I need to get it because I prefer the case I chose, it looks really nice lol.
 
With today's lower ssd prices I would start with a good ssd.
You can always add a HDD later for bulk storage.
240gb is minimum but with 500gb you may never even need a HDD. Even a 1tb drive is reasonable.
I would stick with Samsung evo for performance and reliability.
On a budget, bypass the pricier pcie devices in favor of a larger sata based ssd.

FWIW:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.ebay.com/p/4in1-PC-Power-Reset-Switch-HDD-Motherboar-LED-Cable-Light-Wire-Kit-for-Computer/631889283?iid=142232821294&chn=ps

1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft security essentials is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
 
Sep 12, 2019
7
0
10
0
With today's lower ssd prices I would start with a good ssd.
You can always add a HDD later for bulk storage.
240gb is minimum but with 500gb you may never even need a HDD. Even a 1tb drive is reasonable.
I would stick with Samsung evo for performance and reliability.
On a budget, bypass the pricier pcie devices in favor of a larger sata based ssd.

FWIW:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.ebay.com/p/4in1-PC-Power-Reset-Switch-HDD-Motherboar-LED-Cable-Light-Wire-Kit-for-Computer/631889283?iid=142232821294&chn=ps

1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft security essentials is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
Thanks for the advice man, but I think I'm gonna pay someone to build for me because this is my first time and Im scared I could screw it up somehow.
 
I wouldn't advise getting the parts gradually. It'll cost the same either way. So, save up until you can buy it all at once.
That's not entirely true. Parts can go on deep discount well before you are ready. Jumping on those deals when they present themselves can save a decent chunk of money. You really have to know what you are doing though. It can go south in a hurry if you don't.
 
Sep 13, 2019
62
5
35
1
I wouldn't advise getting the parts gradually. It'll cost the same either way. So, save up until you can buy it all at once.
I disagree. I did the same thing with my i5 3570 build back in 2012-13 and I took advantage of sale prices. At the end I saved $155. I was using my i3 2105 build during the period.
 
Sep 12, 2019
7
0
10
0
That's not entirely true. Parts can go on deep discount well before you are ready. Jumping on those deals when they present themselves can save a decent chunk of money. You really have to know what you are doing though. It can go south in a hurry if you don't.
what would I do if the parts don't work? I would prefer buying parts gradually but I don't wanna risk anything with broken parts
 

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