Question My gpu goes to 83c when at 100% usage

If you temperature is 83c you have an air flow problem.
Either case ,video card or both.
Remove the side panel and test again.
Do temperatures drop dramatically?
If so, you have a case air flow problem.
If not you have a video card air flow problem.
Make sure the fans and heatsink are clean on the video card.
If clean and temps are still high download msi afterburner and set a custom fan curve to lower temps.
 
Jun 30, 2020
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If you temperature is 83c you have an air flow problem.
Either case ,video card or both.
Remove the side panel and test again.
Do temperatures drop dramatically?
If so, you have a case air flow problem.
If not you have a video card air flow problem.
Make sure the fans and heatsink are clean on the video card.
If clean and temps are still high download msi afterburner and set a custom fan curve to lower temps.
Do I have to open the card to clean because that would void my warranty
 
Jun 30, 2020
32
0
30
0
If you temperature is 83c you have an air flow problem.
Either case ,video card or both.
Remove the side panel and test again.
Do temperatures drop dramatically?
If so, you have a case air flow problem.
If not you have a video card air flow problem.
Make sure the fans and heatsink are clean on the video card.
If clean and temps are still high download msi afterburner and set a custom fan curve to lower temps.
i have a spec 05 case, i took off the side panel and temps only dropped by about 1c
 

madmatt30

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What are your ambient/room temps?

If its 30c or over I'd absolutely expect upto 85c on a 1080, throttling temp is just over 90c so it's still acceptable.

If you're benchmarking then youre obviously forcing usage and temps to their absolute max.

Ingame thats not going to happen unless you force it to, which I'd never run a card 100% usage constantly for the sake of it personally.
 
Jun 30, 2020
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What are your ambient/room temps?

If its 30c or over I'd absolutely expect upto 85c on a 1080, throttling temp is just over 90c so it's still acceptable.

If you're benchmarking then youre obviously forcing usage and temps to their absolute max.

Ingame thats not going to happen unless you force it to, which I'd never run a card 100% usage constantly for the sake of it personally.
it's 31c outside but i have no clue what my room temp is, it starts to throttle at 83c and im doing rainbow six siege benchmark at highest possible graphics, in a normal gaming session it only hits around 77c
 

Phaaze88

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If it's 31C outside, I wouldn't expect it to be the same temp inside your room - that'd be a little much, wouldn't it?
It's about that outside where I live, but inside, it's 25C - I keep a thermometer in my room.
The temperature of the inside the chassis is also important, because it's going to affect how well the air going into the gpu and cpu coolers will cool components.

i have a spec 05 case
Ok, now we're making some progress.
There are a few things that affect gpu cooling, to varying degrees:
1)The chassis' front panel design
This one has the greatest impact. I'm sorry, but people who get chassis with those closed off, or near closed off, front designs without a reasonable intake alternative - like the side intake on the O11 Dynamic, for example - pretty much choose to neglect gpu cooling.
Doesn't affect cpu cooling nearly as much - and it's so #facepalm for me to see them go and liquid cool the cpu, when the gpu would benefit more.
The fancy closed off/near closed off designs which appeal to certain people, are for AESTHETICS, and not actual cooling performance; a proper intake or cooling alternative is necessary to avoid subpar thermals.

2)Psu shrouds
One isn't present in your current chassis, but I'll mention the cons anyway:
-blocks a potential bottom air intake - past the psu and it's cables, at least. It's not much, but it's better than no air.
-proximity to the gpu. The closer the shroud is, the worse it'll be - you know, just like having any fan flush, or near flush, with a solid surface.
I'm aware that some psu shrouds have holes drilled in them, but it's still more restrictive than no psu shroud. Shrouds are there for AESTHETICS, not cooling.

3)Horizontal Vs Vertical gpu orientation
You likely still have your gpu horizontal, but still...
Vertical is generally worse, but can be worked with. Cooling impact can be small to heavy on air cooled models; it screws with the airflow in the PC as well.
More for AESTHETICS than actual cooling performance.

A common pattern going on there, if you've noticed...
How many fans are running in this chassis at the moment, and where? You might be able to brute-force more air through the front with stronger fans, but that does come with the tradeoff of more noise.

im doing rainbow six siege benchmark at highest possible graphics, in a normal gaming session it only hits around 77c
I don't play R6 Siege, but is it even that hard on gpus, even at max?

Depending on your gpu's Vbios, the max power limit is either 220w, or 291w, the latter of which will definitely require more effective cooling.

Also, something else that comes to mind, is the thermal paste may have dried up, but if that were the issue, then your gpu would be thermal throttling while playing just about any game... but that's not happening.


To sum up all the above, I think:
-the Spec 05's front intake is weak for gaming graphics cards, which tend to be the hottest devices in those types of systems. [It's so backwards to see people go and liquid cool the cpu in such PCs...]
-your gpu's Vbios is likely the 291w power limit, which would further compound the airflow issue

Therefore, do you go the brute force air route, or a brand new, more airflow friendly, chassis route?
 
Jun 30, 2020
32
0
30
0
If it's 31C outside, I wouldn't expect it to be the same temp inside your room - that'd be a little much, wouldn't it?
It's about that outside where I live, but inside, it's 25C - I keep a thermometer in my room.
The temperature of the inside the chassis is also important, because it's going to affect how well the air going into the gpu and cpu coolers will cool components.


Ok, now we're making some progress.
There are a few things that affect gpu cooling, to varying degrees:
1)The chassis' front panel design
This one has the greatest impact. I'm sorry, but people who get chassis with those closed off, or near closed off, front designs without a reasonable intake alternative - like the side intake on the O11 Dynamic, for example - pretty much choose to neglect gpu cooling.
Doesn't affect cpu cooling nearly as much - and it's so #facepalm for me to see them go and liquid cool the cpu, when the gpu would benefit more.
The fancy closed off/near closed off designs which appeal to certain people, are for AESTHETICS, and not actual cooling performance; a proper intake or cooling alternative is necessary to avoid subpar thermals.

2)Psu shrouds
One isn't present in your current chassis, but I'll mention the cons anyway:
-blocks a potential bottom air intake - past the psu and it's cables, at least. It's not much, but it's better than no air.
-proximity to the gpu. The closer the shroud is, the worse it'll be - you know, just like having any fan flush, or near flush, with a solid surface.
I'm aware that some psu shrouds have holes drilled in them, but it's still more restrictive than no psu shroud. Shrouds are there for AESTHETICS, not cooling.

3)Horizontal Vs Vertical gpu orientation
You likely still have your gpu horizontal, but still...
Vertical is generally worse, but can be worked with. Cooling impact can be small to heavy on air cooled models; it screws with the airflow in the PC as well.
More for AESTHETICS than actual cooling performance.

A common pattern going on there, if you've noticed...
How many fans are running in this chassis at the moment, and where? You might be able to brute-force more air through the front with stronger fans, but that does come with the tradeoff of more noise.


I don't play R6 Siege, but is it even that hard on gpus, even at max?

Depending on your gpu's Vbios, the max power limit is either 220w, or 291w, the latter of which will definitely require more effective cooling.

Also, something else that comes to mind, is the thermal paste may have dried up, but if that were the issue, then your gpu would be thermal throttling while playing just about any game... but that's not happening.


To sum up all the above, I think:
-the Spec 05's front intake is weak for gaming graphics cards, which tend to be the hottest devices in those types of systems. [It's so backwards to see people go and liquid cool the cpu in such PCs...]
-your gpu's Vbios is likely the 291w power limit, which would further compound the airflow issue

Therefore, do you go the brute force air route, or a brand new, more airflow friendly, chassis route?
i think i'll change the thermal paste and then see where the temp stands, if it still is very high i high get a new case. could u recommend a good case that is atx under £100 and how room for multiple hdd's and ssd's
 
Jun 30, 2020
32
0
30
0
If it's 31C outside, I wouldn't expect it to be the same temp inside your room - that'd be a little much, wouldn't it?
It's about that outside where I live, but inside, it's 25C - I keep a thermometer in my room.
The temperature of the inside the chassis is also important, because it's going to affect how well the air going into the gpu and cpu coolers will cool components.


Ok, now we're making some progress.
There are a few things that affect gpu cooling, to varying degrees:
1)The chassis' front panel design
This one has the greatest impact. I'm sorry, but people who get chassis with those closed off, or near closed off, front designs without a reasonable intake alternative - like the side intake on the O11 Dynamic, for example - pretty much choose to neglect gpu cooling.
Doesn't affect cpu cooling nearly as much - and it's so #facepalm for me to see them go and liquid cool the cpu, when the gpu would benefit more.
The fancy closed off/near closed off designs which appeal to certain people, are for AESTHETICS, and not actual cooling performance; a proper intake or cooling alternative is necessary to avoid subpar thermals.

2)Psu shrouds
One isn't present in your current chassis, but I'll mention the cons anyway:
-blocks a potential bottom air intake - past the psu and it's cables, at least. It's not much, but it's better than no air.
-proximity to the gpu. The closer the shroud is, the worse it'll be - you know, just like having any fan flush, or near flush, with a solid surface.
I'm aware that some psu shrouds have holes drilled in them, but it's still more restrictive than no psu shroud. Shrouds are there for AESTHETICS, not cooling.

3)Horizontal Vs Vertical gpu orientation
You likely still have your gpu horizontal, but still...
Vertical is generally worse, but can be worked with. Cooling impact can be small to heavy on air cooled models; it screws with the airflow in the PC as well.
More for AESTHETICS than actual cooling performance.

A common pattern going on there, if you've noticed...
How many fans are running in this chassis at the moment, and where? You might be able to brute-force more air through the front with stronger fans, but that does come with the tradeoff of more noise.


I don't play R6 Siege, but is it even that hard on gpus, even at max?

Depending on your gpu's Vbios, the max power limit is either 220w, or 291w, the latter of which will definitely require more effective cooling.

Also, something else that comes to mind, is the thermal paste may have dried up, but if that were the issue, then your gpu would be thermal throttling while playing just about any game... but that's not happening.


To sum up all the above, I think:
-the Spec 05's front intake is weak for gaming graphics cards, which tend to be the hottest devices in those types of systems. [It's so backwards to see people go and liquid cool the cpu in such PCs...]
-your gpu's Vbios is likely the 291w power limit, which would further compound the airflow issue

Therefore, do you go the brute force air route, or a brand new, more airflow friendly, chassis route?
Is there any way I can quickly check if the front panel is the problem
 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
i think i'll change the thermal paste and then see where the temp stands
Like I said earlier, you won't see a significant change unless the card was throttling to begin with, and you don't see that in game from what you've reported so far.

Is there any way I can quickly check if the front panel is the problem
Yes.
Remove the front, side and top panels.
Play your games and record the max temp.
Play the benchmark(s) again and record the max temp.
If the gpu is getting a reasonable amount of airflow, you should not be seeing more than 5C difference in max temps.
 
Jun 30, 2020
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Like I said earlier, you won't see a significant change unless the card was throttling to begin with, and you don't see that in game from what you've reported so far.


Yes.
Remove the front, side and top panels.
Play your games and record the max temp.
Play the benchmark(s) again and record the max temp.
If the gpu is getting a reasonable amount of airflow, you should not be seeing more than 5C difference in max temps.
i have purchased a new case (h510i) and am going to give my gpu and deep clean aswell as some new thermal paste, do you think doing all this will solve my heating issues
 

Karadjgne

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My Msi 1080 gaming x goes to 83c when at 100% usage, is this normal for my card?
Thermal limit for those cards was 83°C so it's definitely a strong possibility to hit that at 100% usage especially in a poor airflow setup.

Paste can help, for a gpu I'd suggest Arctic MX-4.

With the nzxt H510 series, do not use an intake fan, just use the stock fan at rear exhaust and the second fan at top-rear. You'll get better gpu temps that way.
 
Jun 30, 2020
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Thermal limit for those cards was 83°C so it's definitely a strong possibility to hit that at 100% usage especially in a poor airflow setup.

Paste can help, for a gpu I'd suggest Arctic MX-4.

With the nzxt H510 series, do not use an intake fan, just use the stock fan at rear exhaust and the second fan at top-rear. You'll get better gpu temps that way.
are you sure? does it make airflow worse if i add front fans ?
 

Phaaze88

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https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3309-nzxt-h500-case-review-thermals-noise-vs-s340
CPU Torture

That's delta T over ambient in the chart, not actual temperature.

"Starting with torture tests and the NZXT H500-only data, average CPU temperature was 61 degrees Celsius over ambient in the torture test and with the stock fan configuration. Again, as a reminder, that’s dual-exhaust. Removing the unnecessary top filter lowered that to 57.3 degrees. It’s a good thing NZXT included the filter so that it could be used in top intake configurations, but if the stock (exhaust) fan layout is used it should definitely be removed. We left the filter in place for all other tests since that’s how the case ships. Adding a 140mm intake fan to the uppermost of the front mounts lowered CPU temperature barely more than removing the filter did, down to 56.5C, while moving both 120mm fans to the front intake slots was equivalent to removing the filter at 57.2 degrees. Exhaust-only may not be the best stock configuration, but it does leave more room for CLC options in the front."
GPU Torture

Again, delta T over ambient, not actual temperature.

"Average GPU temperature in the torture test was 52.4 degrees Celsius with the stock fan configuration, and 53C with the top filter removed, a minor change within margin of error. Interestingly, temperature went up quite a bit with the 140mm intake fan added, up to 59.3C and 58.9C with the 120mm fans moved to front intake. This is where the the stock fan configuration starts to make sense. NZXT chose negative pressure because this allows the GPU to draw air in through empty expansion slots, rather than relying on intake from the mostly-sealed front of the case. When front intake fans are added, even ones pointing towards the GPU, this airflow pattern is disrupted and the GPU can no longer pull cool air in from behind the case."
 

Karadjgne

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The H510 series work quite well on a negative system setup. The problem often lies with ppl wanting to use front intakes, especially rgb fans. They get the idea in their head that the normal way airflow is setup in those cases is the Only way to set it up, but realistically it doesn't work that well, but funnily the 'normal' way almost all 3rd party OEM prebuilts work, does.
 
Jun 30, 2020
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https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3309-nzxt-h500-case-review-thermals-noise-vs-s340
CPU Torture

That's delta T over ambient in the chart, not actual temperature.

"Starting with torture tests and the NZXT H500-only data, average CPU temperature was 61 degrees Celsius over ambient in the torture test and with the stock fan configuration. Again, as a reminder, that’s dual-exhaust. Removing the unnecessary top filter lowered that to 57.3 degrees. It’s a good thing NZXT included the filter so that it could be used in top intake configurations, but if the stock (exhaust) fan layout is used it should definitely be removed. We left the filter in place for all other tests since that’s how the case ships. Adding a 140mm intake fan to the uppermost of the front mounts lowered CPU temperature barely more than removing the filter did, down to 56.5C, while moving both 120mm fans to the front intake slots was equivalent to removing the filter at 57.2 degrees. Exhaust-only may not be the best stock configuration, but it does leave more room for CLC options in the front."
GPU Torture

Again, delta T over ambient, not actual temperature.

"Average GPU temperature in the torture test was 52.4 degrees Celsius with the stock fan configuration, and 53C with the top filter removed, a minor change within margin of error. Interestingly, temperature went up quite a bit with the 140mm intake fan added, up to 59.3C and 58.9C with the 120mm fans moved to front intake. This is where the the stock fan configuration starts to make sense. NZXT chose negative pressure because this allows the GPU to draw air in through empty expansion slots, rather than relying on intake from the mostly-sealed front of the case. When front intake fans are added, even ones pointing towards the GPU, this airflow pattern is disrupted and the GPU can no longer pull cool air in from behind the case."
so would my pc be cooler if i just didn't add any intake fans
 

Phaaze88

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That's what I and Karadjgne are saying.

The front panel should be reserved for a 240/280mm liquid cooler on the hottest device if you so choose - that's the true purpose of the front panel.
Since most gaming PCs have the gpu as the hottest device, NZXT intended for users to use their Kraken G12 kit with an Asetek-made AIO/CLC.
 

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