[SOLVED] My GTX 750Ti stop getting detected after an GameReady update

Dec 16, 2021
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Hi, I was gifted this GTX 750Ti (Gigabyte GV-N75TD5-2GI) from a friend last Saturday. I installed the card and its driver and everything was working well so far. I had an AMD Radeon HD 6670 before that, and since my monitor doesn't have any HDMI or DVI port, I plug the monitor into the motherboard instead, but the OS was still able to detect it and install the card's driver anyways. The only thing that doesn't get installed correctly was the "Game Ready Driver" that was shown to me with a prompt in GeForce Experience. Frankly speaking, the card only ran well when there was still an error with that driver, I was able to choose the exact graphics driver for apps in Windows Settings and play games with it. Yesterday, when i boot up the computer, the Game Ready driver is now installed correctly, but my card isn't being detected anymore. It is not showing up in Device Manager, BIOS setting, and I couldn't reinstall the driver either. The fan is still working, so i think there is not a problem with the card itself or the power supply.

Notice:
  • The card have a 6 pin power slot, however I have to buy a molex to 6 pin adapter since my power supply doesn't have that cable
  • There is no video output from the card either
  • I have used the old card and it worked smoothly, so it's not a problem with the PCIE slot
  • Card fan still run 100%
What i have tried
  • Reinstall drivers for GTX 750Ti specifically and via GeForce Experience: not working
  • Uninstall the card's driver that is hidden in Device Manager and install the first attempt again: not working
  • Switch primary display to PCIE in BIOS setting and plug an HDMI cable directly to the card: not working, always fallback to the integrated graphics card
  • The same as above, but this time a DVI to VGA dongle: not working, always fallback to the integrated graphics card
My build:
  • CPU: Intel Pentium Gold G5400
  • Motherboard: ASUS Prime H310M-K R2.0
  • RAM: 12GB DDR4
  • Power supply: Jupi-star 500
  • OS: Windows 11 Pro
I have searched for many solution online and many have the same issue as me but however i couldn't find an answer :(
 
You need to check/test the GTX 750 Ti on a completely different PC. Maybe at your friend's place. Doing this will narrow down the problem.

Initially, yes any GPU can work, regardless of the PSU, but that doesn't mean it's a good idea to use a cheap/generic PSU Model. The PSU can take out the system and your card anytime, depending on how good/bad the power unit is (some units are labelled as Fire Hazards as well).

BTW, does your PSU even have a proper 6-PIN PCIE/PEG connector ? I guess not. Don't use MOLEX adapters. If any PSU lacks any essential power cables, then that PSU Model was NOT meant to power up GPUs which require a 6 or 8-PIN connector. They are simply designed to be used for a totally different use case, be it office work, web browsing, and other similar chores.
 
Reactions: dotas1 and r3zenix
First of all, I just wanted to quickly let you know that your current PSU Model is a cheap generic power supply unit model. Do NOT use this to power up any Gaming PC. Be assured that such poor and low quality PUS models might even blow up the PC one day as well. Well, depending on how bad the components are, and the build quality.

Too risky to use such Models for any Gaming PC. Regarding your troubleshooting issue, I don't have any concrete answer/solution right now. But it looks your GPU Might be fried/dead, imo. When I get back home, I will see how to troubleshoot this issue (very busy right now)....

Is this your PSU model ?

 
Dec 16, 2021
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First of all, I just wanted to quickly let you know that your current PSU Model is a cheap generic power supply unit model. Do NOT use this to power up and Gaming PC. Be assured such poor and low quality PUS models might even blow up the PC one day as well. Well, depending on how bad the components are, and the build quality.

Too risky to use such Models for any Gaming PC. Regarding your troubleshooting issue, I don't have any concrete answer/solution right now. But it looks your GPU Might be fried/dead, imo. When I get back home, I will see how to troubleshoot this issue (very busy right now)....

Is this your PSU model ?

Yes, that is that PC's PSU, and I think it might be the problem of the case that i'm struggling with.

However the card did worked at full power without any issue until i was able to install the Game Ready driver correctly, so i don't know if the problem lie in the PSU, or the software driver itself.
 
You need to check/test the GTX 750 Ti on a completely different PC. Maybe at your friend's place. Doing this will narrow down the problem.

Initially, yes any GPU can work, regardless of the PSU, but that doesn't mean it's a good idea to use a cheap/generic PSU Model. The PSU can take out the system and your card anytime, depending on how good/bad the power unit is (some units are labelled as Fire Hazards as well).

BTW, does your PSU even have a proper 6-PIN PCIE/PEG connector ? I guess not. Don't use MOLEX adapters. If any PSU lacks any essential power cables, then that PSU Model was NOT meant to power up GPUs which require a 6 or 8-PIN connector. They are simply designed to be used for a totally different use case, be it office work, web browsing, and other similar chores.
 
Reactions: dotas1 and r3zenix
Dec 16, 2021
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The GPU seems to be working in my main build with a better PSU without issues.

I will try to update the driver this time to see if the problem still persist.
 
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The GPU seems to be working in my main build with a better PSU without issues.

I will try to update the driver this time to see if the problem still persist.
However the card did worked at full power without any issue until i was able to install the Game Ready driver correctly
That is not full power. Before the installation of proper drivers, Microsoft basic drivers were loaded which made the GPU use the lowest power state available just to show picture. Lowest clocks possible with base functions only. The installation of drivers makes the GPU run at advertised speeds and using the full TDP.
 
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That is not full power. Before the installation of proper drivers, Microsoft basic drivers were loaded which made the GPU use the lowest power state available just to show picture. Lowest clocks possible with base functions only. The installation of drivers makes the GPU run at advertised speeds and using the full TDP.
Oh I didn't know that. Well what I was trying to say is that the GPU was still functioning before the update.
 
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How old is the GPU ? Was it a brand new graphics card?
The GPU is around 6 years old as of now and I will be using it for my younger brother's PC. It was a brand new graphics card at the time my friend bought it. However he said he upgraded to a better one around 4 months later so I don't think it was used much.
 
Under heavy load the PSU might cause trouble, if it can't keep up with the power requirements of the GPU and the entire system under stress. It might also cause system shutdown/restart, and crashes etc.

Regarding any physical damage, it all depends on the make/quality of the PSU. But in the long run some cheap/generic PSU models will surely fail to function properly, if used in any mid-range/high-end gaming PC, if not sooner.

Is this what you are asking ?
 
Reactions: dotas1

ttower2020

Reputable
The bad PSU could have damaged the GPU, but it also may be fine. Definitely replace the PSU, as it is a low quality PSU, and using a Molex to PCIe adapter is not a good idea. A 500W PSU should be capable for powering a PCIe card, but if the PSU did not come with a PCIe cable by default, then it is a very low quality unit, and is likely unable to deliver anywhere near 500W sustained.
 
Yes, you should definitely replace that PSU for your future gaming upgrades/needs. Never go cheap on the PSU, since this is the most important PC component. I can't stress this enough.

Because a lot of peeps actually SKIMP on the PSU. And most importantly, some aren't even fully aware that WATTAGE number alone means nothing when it comes to any power supply. The main concern is the "quality" of the power, the quality of the components used/CAPS, as well as the total AMP drawn on the +12V RAIL (output), the efficiency under load, "ripple suppression", among other factors. The total wattage number of any PSU is not always really the most important deciding factor, primary concern is the 'quality' of power it produces, and the total capacity of the 12V source etc.

Though how the rails are laid out does not affect that much, i.e. single/multiple +12V rail PSUs. Multi-rail PSU can be mildly better, especially with high wattage unit, but it won't have any impact on your performance, however, it can provide an extra layer of safety in case you get a short circuit. A multi-rail power supply has OCP on all +12V rails, ensuring that your PC components stay alive, if a problem like a short circuit occurs (unless I'm mistaken).

A cheap generic/standard low-end PSU is prone to failure soon, than the units made by reputed brands like SEASONIC, Corsair, BE QUIET, EVGA Supernova, PC Power & Cooling, ANTEC. XFX, Super Flower, OCZ, just to name a few. The OEM also matters a lot, instead of the actual PSU brand. I've seen PSUs labelled as 1K watts, but in actual real world scenarios, they can hardly pull 400 Watts from the wall, even under full load.

I've always given the topmost priority to PSU when building any RIG, and I mostly go for Tier 1 and/or Tier 2 units, because we know a TITANIUM/Platinum/Gold PSU is going to be much more efficient under 50% load, than a bronze/silver or a generic 80 plus certified PSU. But the exact Wattage requirement still varies from system to system, and if we plan to Overclock the GPU/CPU, then the PSU should have some headroom as well.

Power supplies are an imperative part of your system that should not be taken lightly. Throwing in a budget PSU could result in poor power efficiency or even a wrecked system.

I would recommend you to get the following PSU models and brands, assuming you have the budget. These are high quality units. Look for similar SKUs. But the list is NOT exhaustive, There are many more models as well, and the companies have released some new and revised versions of these SKUs as well, IMO. I have not been keeping track and staying up-to-date on the latest PSU hierarchy, performance Tier and the like, but these units are definitely worth checking out. I used to recommend these units few years back though.

Check the latest PSU tier list on the internet as well as on Tom's HW forums for more info.

SEASONIC- PRIME, and Prime Ultra, or FOCUS Plus GOLD, Focus Plus Platinum.

CORSAIR- AXi, RMi, RMx 550/650W, SF, HX 2017, HXi.

FSP - Hydro PTM 550/650W.

Cooler Master - MasterWatt Maker MiJ, V series 550/650W.

Antec - High Current Pro, High Current Platinum, Earthwatts Pro Gold, HCG Gold.

Super Flower - Leadex Gold II.

be Quiet! - Dark Power Pro 11, Straight Power 11, Dark Power Pro P10.

EVGA -Supernova G1+, GQ, P2, T2, G2, B2, BQ =>750.

Oh Btw, as a side note I just wanted to point this out as well. Credit goes to @Darkbreeze for this list of PSU models and brands. Original Thread link.


Other models that should never be trusted OR USED AT ALL, under any circumstances, include

A-Top, AK Power, Alpine, Apevia, Apex (Supercase/Allied), Artic, Ace, Aerocool (There might be one model worth using, but I'd still avoid them.), Aspire (Turbocase), Atadc, Atrix, Broadway com corp, Chieftech, Circle, CIT, Coolmax, Deer, Diablotek, Dynapower, Dynex, Eagletech, Enlight, Eurotech, Evo labs, EZ cool, Feedtek, Foxconn, G7, HEC/Compucase Orion, HEDY, High power, iBall, iStar computer co., Jeantec, JPac, Just PC, Kolink, LC Power, Linkworld electronics, Logisys, Macron, MSI, NmediaPC, Norwood Micro (CompUSA), Okia, Powercool, Powmax, Pulsepower, Q-tec, Raidmax, Rave, Rocketfish, Segotep, SFC, Sharkoon, Shuttle, Skyhawk, Spire, Startech, Storm, Sumvision, Tesla, Trust, Ultra, Wintech, Winpower, Xilence (Until I see a reputable review of a model showing different), xTreme (Cyberpower), Youngbear and Zebronics.

 
Dec 16, 2021
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Under heavy load the PSU might cause trouble, if it can't keep up with the power requirements of the GPU and the entire system under stress. It might also cause system shutdown/restart, and crashes etc.

Regarding any physical damage, it all depends on the make/quality of the PSU. But in the long run some cheap/generic PSU models will surely fail to function properly, if used in any mid-range/high-end gaming PC, if not sooner.

Is this what you are asking ?
I was asking if the PSU didn't meet the GPU's power requirement in general, would there be any serve damage to the GPU? (like fried, broken, etc..)
 
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Thanks for all your answer! I guess from now on I will keep an eyes on the current PSU of any PC before consider upgrading.
 

ttower2020

Reputable
I was asking if the PSU didn't meet the GPU's power requirement in general, would there be any serve damage to the GPU? (like fried, broken, etc..)
it depends. If the PSU doesnt output enough power at all, the GPU would usually not work at all, or immediately crash under load. The bigger problem is the PSU provides enough wattage for it to run, but that power it delivers is very "dirty". That dirty power supplied by a cheap PSU is what usually causes damage to the GPU. It can be hard to diagnose a PSU issue, and there is no way to know for sure if the GPU is fine, or the PSU hurt it, until you replace the PSU with a better quality unit.
 
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it depends. If the PSU doesnt output enough power at all, the GPU would usually not work at all, or immediately crash under load. The bigger problem is the PSU provides enough wattage for it to run, but that power it delivers is very "dirty". That dirty power supplied by a cheap PSU is what usually causes damage to the GPU. It can be hard to diagnose a PSU issue, and there is no way to know for sure if the GPU is fine, or the PSU hurt it, until you replace the PSU with a better quality unit.
Thank you. I used an electric tester and it seems like the output power of the molex adapter is not enough all the time, and it's just a coincidence that the GPU decided to shut itself off due to the limited input power the exact moment the Game Ready driver is updated. Thanks for all your reply. I will mark this thread as solved.
 
Dec 17, 2021
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I had the same issue when I transfered my old nVidia GTX 980-ti from my old PC to my new build . Built a new PC, 11700k, DD4, on a Gigabyte Motherboard and an EVGA 750 GQ PSU. Within 15 minutes of updating the nVidia drivers on Windows 11, it fried my GTX 980-ti, computer rebooted and motherboard gives a VGA error. When I transfered the card back on my old computer, my old ASUS motherboard still indicates VGA error.

If it were my installation, it would not have worked for a while before frying. Note that the PSU is a good brand, one of the ones mentioned in the replies above. So, I can't tell if it was the PSU, the Motherboard or the nVidia drivers update, but it looks like somone may be trying to increase the demand for GPUs in a market that is already short on supply.

If anyone has any insight, I would appreicate it. Thanks
 
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I had the same issue when I transfered my old nVidia GTX 980-ti from my old PC to my new build . Built a new PC, 11700k, DD4, on a Gigabyte Motherboard and an EVGA 750 GQ PSU. Within 15 minutes of updating the nVidia drivers on Windows 11, it fried my GTX 980-ti, computer rebooted and motherboard gives a VGA error. When I transfered the card back on my old computer, my old ASUS motherboard still indicates VGA error.

If it were my installation, it would not have worked for a while before frying. Note that the PSU is a good brand, one of the ones mentioned in the replies above. So, I can't tell if it was the PSU, the Motherboard or the nVidia drivers update, but it looks like somone may be trying to increase the demand for GPUs in a market that is already short on supply.

If anyone has any insight, I would appreicate it. Thanks
That was the same case for me too. The driver was updating for a while, and when it finished updating, the PC crashed. I thought it was just a reboot for the driver to apply, but the problem that i mentioned in the initial message started to appear right after that.
I am using the 750ti on my main machine to test now. There is a new driver update too, however i'm too scared to do the update. Probably just stay away from those driver updates for now 😑
 
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Are you testing the GPU on some other different PC now ? Specs of that system ?
Here is my specs:

CPU: Intel Core i5-9600KF
Mainboard: ASUS Prime Z390-A LGA1151
CPU fan: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO
RAM: Corsair CMW16GX4M2C3200C16 Vengeance RGB PRO 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4 3200 MHz
PSU: Corsair VS650 650 W Active PFC 80 PLUS
SSD: ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 1TB M.2
GPU: Gigabyte GV-N2060OC-6GD REV2.0 GeForce RTX 2060 6GB, now Gigabyte GV-N75TD5-2GI GeForce GTX 750Ti
Case: Corsair iCUE 220T
Fans: Corsair iCUE SP120 RGB
 
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Update: For some reason, the Game Ready driver updated itself again. The 750Ti is not recognized on my main build this time. Perhaps I will bring it to a tech center for further troubleshooting.
 
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