Discussion My October 2019 Computer Builder's Guide

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PCDesignerR

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This is my personally hand-selected October 2019 Computer Build hot off the market. All parts are sourced from Amazon.com. It includes some of the components for an office setup as well and is currently everything I need for my 2019 October office setup and computer build. Please share your thoughts accordingly.

October 2019 Computer Builder’s Guide:

Computer Case:
Thermaltake WP200
Notes:

For this case I'm coming from the Thermaltake Core-X9. This computer case, I can't think of a better one to use right now, especially since I will be able to use the case's two-build-one-case feature. It has wheels, hinge-swing open side panels, is Thermaltake. I'm hoping the wheels come out like the wheels on an office chair because if they do I can replace them with a more aftermarket wheel. I'm Ryan and I approve of this message. ;)
Motherboard:
MSI MPG Z390 Gaming Plus
Notes:

Another MSI brand piece. I haven't probably done as much market research for the board upgrade yet as I need to before I build, but at the same time this also looks like a fairly solid board in the MSI Z390 flavor so I feel, safe about it. ;)
CPU:
Intel Core i9-9900KS
Notes:

Coming from an Intel Core i7-5960X. The 9900KS is really an excellent processor.
CPU Cooler:
Corsair H115i Pro RGB
Corsair H150i Pro RGB
Notes:

When it comes to liquid cooling I tend to stay away from a custom loop cooler. They look great! But they're a pain in the rear end to use, they need to be cleaned regularly, they are dangerous to install properly, and there are a ton of trade secrets with custom looping that you nearly can't get if you don't already know. I'm not a fan of strictly air-cooling for a CPU so the Corsair Hydro series really can't go wrong.
Memory:
Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 32GB DDR4-3200
PSU:
Corsair Ax1600i
Notes:

I'm already running a 1200i so the 16 is a short step forward from my 12 and offers plenty of room for any expansion related to power needs for the future. Also this line of PSUs is fully modular and I can't even imagine using a non-modular PSU, you might as well just buy a pre-build if you're going to be ok with all of those tacky plastic junk PSU cables you can't do anything about. ;)
PSU Cable Kit:
PSU Cable Kit for Modular PSU
Notes:
This is a Red/Black braided cable kit that is compatible with the modular Ax Series PSUs.
GPU:
EVGA GeForce RTX 2080Ti
Notes:

Coming from an Asus Strix 1080Ti. Out of everything in this build, this is probably the most unnecessary based on what GPU I'm coming from, but a second computer needs a GPU and I don't like stepping down a build knowing that there's another rung to step to in this case. I could always look to get another 1080Ti but I find myself asking, "why not an RTX 2080Ti" for which I have no answer.
Powered USB Hub
Notes:

16 port, USB 3.0, 90W, on/off switches
Desk Surface:
Jarvis Electric Standing Desk
Notes:
So, right now I have a bunch of IKEA coffee tables as my office surface area. The switch to this desk is a no-brainer and will definitely be worth it once it's in place. If you're looking to get one of these you really can't go wrong with the Jarvis brand either.
Hard Drive Bay:
Orico 5 Bay
Notes:
ORICO Brand, 5 bay, USB 3.0, 2.5"/3.5" SSD compatible
System Drive M.2:
Samsung 970 Pro M.2 SSD 1TB
Notes:
Now that M.2s are a thing, I can't see myself ever using anything less than for a system drive. Samsung is a winner too.
Display:
MSI Optix MPG341CQRV
Notes:
MSI is definitely hands down my preferred hardware brand of choice. I know they are Chinese based (I'm, in the US), but you won't really find a better looking brand(personal opinion) and the performance hasn't let me down yet. I really will never go back to a flat panel display ever again versus a curved and the same basically goes for ultra-wide versus anything less than. It's a life choice ;)
Case Fans: x8
Noctua 3000 RPM PWM
Notes:
I've learned from experience that Noctua is my only preferred direction when it comes to case fans. They don't look quite as flashy as some of the other brands, but when it comes to how reliable they are they really can't be beat. It's pretty easy to get these fans in solid black and that always goes with everything unless you're basically doing all white.... in which case a black color accent still works.
Router:
Asus ROG GT-AX11000
Notes:
None at this time
TOTAL:
Unlisted

Builder's Tips:
Case fans these days have rubber sound dampeners on the corners. Trying to install the fan with screws in combination with these dampeners can be quite the hassle. Instead of using screws I use zip-ties. They hold the fan just as securely as a screw, are much easier to install and remove, and can work with any color scheme I use in my build. One of the best ways I've found to cut zip-ties away is by using an ordinary pair of toenail clippers.

*Total price of build subject to change per price drops and increases according to parts as listed on Amazon.com.
*Computer build/upgrade style is not for the faint of heart and is designed only for the baddest most hungry builders.
 
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WildCard999

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It's really expensive.

PSU is beyond what you'd need even for SLI mind only a single 2080 ti.

The case is for dual systems so are planning on adding in another build?

If you look at my build in this contest you can do dual systems with a 9700K/32gb RAM & 2080 ti for under $5,000.

Depending on the uses you could probably cut the costs significantly, gaming only I could probably do it for 1/2 the cost if not cheaper due to AMD Ryzen 3rd gen which has excellent performance for the price.
 
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PCDesignerR

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It's really expensive.

PSU is beyond what you'd need even for SLI mind only a single 2080 ti.

The case is for dual systems so are planning on adding in another build?

If you look at my build in this contest you can do dual systems with a 9700K/32gb RAM & 2080 ti for under $5,000.

Depending on the uses you could probably cut the costs significantly, gaming only I could probably do it for 1/2 the cost if not cheaper due to AMD Ryzen 3rd gen which has excellent performance for the price.
I really appreciate the input! As a building enthusiast I mostly build for the sake of building a top of the line computer build. I know some of this is excessive, and I get that most people don't get why I build that way, but, most importantly of all, the way I build fits me pretty well. I can think of any modification I can make to this outline to really step it up further and that is the level I aim to build at.
I do have a current computer and the case I selected would be used to fit that system so this case would indeed be holding and running two systems in one build. As far as gaming goes, my ultimate goal is to have a setup where two people can play locally with screens facing the player back to back of each other, both online, but ready to play against each other locally at any time.
I think most people build with the aim of the most efficient build for their need possible in mind. I build to A), try to hit the top of the market on hardware, and B), to build a computer that can basically do anything and everything in any situation short of being a server build or a commercial/military grade supercomputer.

If I were to remove a few of the items not directly tied into the actual function of the computer itself (desk, hard drive dock, usb hub, etc) I believe this would be under the $5K mark.
 
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WildCard999

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Ok so yea that makes a bit more sense and if you do have that disposable income then go for it (I would if I could!). The PSU though is still way more then you'll ever need so I'd change it to the 750/850W version which still gives you plenty overhead even with overclocking.

Nice choice on the monitor and as long as your using DisplayPort you should be able to utilize the Freesync with your Nvidia GPU, follow these steps.
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/how-to-run-gsync-on-freesync-monitor,6072.html
 
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PCDesignerR

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Ok so yea that makes a bit more sense and if you do have that disposable income then go for it (I would if I could!). The PSU though is still way more then you'll ever need so I'd change it to the 750/850W version which still gives you plenty overhead even with overclocking.

Nice choice on the monitor and as long as your using DisplayPort you should be able to utilize the Freesync with your Nvidia GPU, follow these steps.
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/how-to-run-gsync-on-freesync-monitor,6072.html
Oh yeah, always DP for the screens :). Right now in my current build I'm running an Ax1200i so the 1600 is only a short step forward from there. I don't really have a disposable income, but being a career IT technician helps. That and I work my ass off to really get the funding for these builds because I love doing them so much. I definitely have my bills like anyone else though. I want to inspire anyone to know that they can do the same if they really set their mind to it. There have been times when I probably sacrificed for my build a bit more than I should have, but looking back on that now I have no regrets about what I've done to get what I've got.
 
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WildCard999

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When it's finished you should show it off here and in the TH Members System Gallery.

Then there's always PCPer to should off your builds.
 
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PCDesignerR

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When it's finished you should show it off here and in the TH Members System Gallery.

Then there's always PCPer to should off your builds.
I do like part picker, but when it comes to shipping with Prime I can't get a better deal on shipping speed versus price than from Amazon, despite how not a fan of Amazon being an evil-corp I am...
 
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