Question My pc keeps shutting down while playing games

Dec 29, 2021
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Hi. I have a question that someone might be able to answer me.

I got a new video card and after using it for a couple of hours problems happened while I was playing games. So basicly when I start exact games (for example Rocket League, Hell Let Loose, SWBF2) after a couple of minutes of play my pc keeps shutting down (like when the power is gone) and reboot immediately. This never happened with my old card so I'm guessing everything is fine with my rig. Obviously I have the latest drivers, I tried reinstalling windows, cooling is not an issue because my GPUs max temp is around ~65C everytime and the CPU and the motherboard is max ~50-60C also my PSU is using around 120-130W max, cables are not touching any compontent in the pc's case, I tried stress tests both on the CPU and GPU and everything was perfect I got no shut downs, I tried reconfigure voltages in Radeon Software but the problem still occurs. I somehow figured out if I play on windowed mode or medium settings it solves the problem for a while. It's really annoying so I accept any possible solution. Thanks!

My Specs are:

Motherboard: Asus P8Z68 Deluxe
Ram: Corsair Vengeance 4gb DDR3 1600MHz
GPU: MSI Radeon Rx 480 8Gb GDDR5 265bit (used to have some Amd 3000 series 2Gb I'm not sure which lol)
CPU: Intel Core i7 2600k 3.4GHz
PSU: Chieftec iArena 600W
HDD: Western Digital 1TB
Os: Win 10 64bit
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper H412R
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
How old is that Chieftec PSU? History of heavy use for gaming, video editing, or even bit-mining?

Very likely that the current power demands are beyond what the PSU can steadily provide. Especially at peak times.

PSU may be starting to falter and fail. Especially if nearing its' designed in EOL (End of Life).

You might gain a bit of a reprieve with some "house cleaning":

Power down, unplug, open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, and jumpers are fully and firmly in place.

Use a bright flashlight and magnifying glass to inspect for signs of damage.

All in all though my thought is that a new PSU may be warranted.

PSU could fail catastrophically so be prepared - just in case.

Be sure that all important data is backed up at least 2 x to locations off of the problem PC. Verify that the backups are indeed recoverable and readable.
 
Dec 29, 2021
3
0
10
0
How old is that Chieftec PSU? History of heavy use for gaming, video editing, or even bit-mining?

Very likely that the current power demands are beyond what the PSU can steadily provide. Especially at peak times.

PSU may be starting to falter and fail. Especially if nearing its' designed in EOL (End of Life).

You might gain a bit of a reprieve with some "house cleaning":

Power down, unplug, open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, and jumpers are fully and firmly in place.

Use a bright flashlight and magnifying glass to inspect for signs of damage.

All in all though my thought is that a new PSU may be warranted.

PSU could fail catastrophically so be prepared - just in case.

Be sure that all important data is backed up at least 2 x to locations off of the problem PC. Verify that the backups are indeed recoverable and readable.
I'm not sure but around 8 years old. No history of heavy gaming, editing or mining tho. I also cleaned my case and the components, and also I got a new case since then. But when I cleaned everything the pc didn't boot and took me like 3 hours to figure out that one of the rams caused the problem. Like I switched both rams in every possible way to different slots and when I took out on of them the pc booted. This happened me twice and I'm not sure if it's connected to the 'pc shutting down' problem or it still might be the PSU causing it.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
After the next successful boot look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes, warnings, or even informational events that occurred just before or at the time of the shutdowns.

Start with Reliability History - much more user friendly and the time line format can be very revealing.

An increasing number of errors and varying errors is, in my mind, a sign of a failing/faltering PSU.
 
Dec 29, 2021
3
0
10
0
After the next successful boot look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes, warnings, or even informational events that occurred just before or at the time of the shutdowns.

Start with Reliability History - much more user friendly and the time line format can be very revealing.

An increasing number of errors and varying errors is, in my mind, a sign of a failing/faltering PSU.
Thanks! I might buy a new one to test it out if it solves it. Do you have any recommendation for a new PSU? Possibly around ~100$
 

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