Question My PC needs to be left on standby for at-least an hour before it can be turned on. It functions normally after that. What is wrong with it?

Aug 17, 2020
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When I try to turn on my PC in the morning it starts momentarily and turns off. Usually, it turns off at the very beginning and sometimes while it is booting (at the windows logo).

I have figured out that it will boot normally if I turn on the power supply and leave it on standby for an hour. It will function normally after that, for the entire day. I can even shut down and turn-on after few hours.

This happens if it is unused for more than 6hrs. Here are my PC specifications. Please help.



Motherboard: Intel DH55TC

Processor: Intel core i3 - 540

Graphics card: NVDIA ZOTAC GeForce 9800GT

Ram: Transcend DDR3 2GB x 3 = 6GB

Storage: Samsung SSD 850 EVO - 250GB

Power supply: 400Watt

I have tested the voltage in the power supply. It is normal. Please let me know what could be the problem.
 
Aug 17, 2020
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It could be the PSU but it could also be a capacitor on your mobo,you should open up your case and look at all the capacitors if there is a slight bulge on any of them it shows that it's not working at 100% anymore.
Hi, I checked my motherboard. There are no bulges or leaks from any of the capacitors. I could not find any burn marks either.
I opened the PSU and one capacitor has a slight bulge. Nothing is printed on it. Please find the images here Capacitor bulge , Layout 1, Layout 2. Pls suggest
 
Hi, I checked my motherboard. There are no bulges or leaks from any of the capacitors. I could not find any burn marks either.
I opened the PSU and one capacitor has a slight bulge. Nothing is printed on it. Please find the images here Capacitor bulge , Layout 1, Layout 2. Pls suggest
Don't risk it,if you don't have enough experience you could get a serious electric shock.
Normally an electrician would recreate the situation, leave the PSU on for a while and then measure the mf of that capacitor while still connected to the board,you won't get the exact right measurement but since cpas come in tiers you would replace it with whatever is closest,although if you unsolder it it should have that info printed on it somewhere.
Better buy a new PSU,it's not worth it dying over it and giving it to a store for repairs is not going to be worth it unless it was a super expensive PSU.
 
Reactions: SGCbabu
Aug 17, 2020
4
0
10
0
Don't risk it,if you don't have enough experience you could get a serious electric shock.
Normally an electrician would recreate the situation, leave the PSU on for a while and then measure the mf of that capacitor while still connected to the board,you won't get the exact right measurement but since cpas come in tiers you would replace it with whatever is closest,although if you unsolder it it should have that info printed on it somewhere.
Better buy a new PSU,it's not worth it dying over it and giving it to a store for repairs is not going to be worth it unless it was a super expensive PSU.
Okey. How can I know for sure that it due to the PSU? What if I get a new one and the problem persists?
Thanks.
 

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