My personal Mods. (New D.I.Y. water cooling project)

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lol, typo on the bolded part. It should be 2.166 gallons per second.
I doubt it's running at full 130, probably about 90-100GPM actual. Btw, I'm glad I got the JB Weld. That stuff IS strong!
 

ir_efrem

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I am not trying to call you out on anything bro, really I'm not. It's just that some of best water pumps available are around a max of aprox 500 gallons per hour. Sure there are stronger ones..... You mention 130gpm and that is a phenomenal pump (stats wise). I am sorta wondering if your pump isn't actually 130 gph instead of gpm.

Not calling you a liar or anything please don't think that. And if the manufacturer marked it as 130gpm, they are lying; without a HUGE impeller and a massive outlet/inlet its not possible to get 2.0gps. That amount of water through even a 3/4 inch line is nearly impossible without massive amounts of pressure and something tells me that you aren't using 3/4 lines.
 

Proximon

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That would fill up three 50 gallon drums in 75 seconds? (That's the image I use to get a handle on it.) That would be quite a bit more than the water supply to your house. The average garden hose would probably be about 5gpm.
 

ir_efrem

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Meh, no worries actually. Just picking something to talk about to keep the topic alive? lol

You definitely sound educated enough to know the difference on the pump's actual abilities, I just found it odd is all.

I have started on my heater core shroud and might even finish it tomorrow, I'll post some pics if I do.
 

Yup. Like said before. Will get actual results soon. I'm interested how this $5 pump will stand up against a D5. :D
 

ir_efrem

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Got the shroud done and I am pleased with the outcome. I used some left over, pre-bent aluminum flashing, of course I've added bends of my own but they were originally just 90 degree bends...


 

ir_efrem

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Well I don't have any paint right at this moment but I might paint it black eventually. It will be resting outside of the case, in the back, and is not really noticeable. Either way it's not a huge concern. I don't mind the color now. :)
 

acer0169

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I really like the heatpipes idea. Maybe to help pre-set water cooling kits you could add a joint where the pipes go into a heatpipe / heatsink and cool it down further than what the rad can by itself? Interesting ideas..
 

ir_efrem

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This has been up and running since my last post.

At some point in my tinkering with crap I unplugged the fans yesterday. With no airflow all day long I eventually noticed that the fan was unplugged and decided to look at temperatures. Kinda cool actually, my system had been on all day long and the temp was only 53c. Definitely not nice and cool but not overheating at all.

I believe that I have some viable numbers now. I am using the following methodology. I let the computer warm up, which is just letting it sit there at idle for a couple of hours. Ambient room temperature is 26c and seems to be fairly constant. For 100% on all cores I am using Prime95, Large FTTs and I let this run for exactly 2 hours. Ive tested on Win7 Beta and XP, the numbers given are from Win7, oddly enough XP keeps the CPU exactly 1c cooler at both idle and Max. My fans are leftover 120mm case fans from an Apple PPC, I have no good information about them. I hope to get some decent fans here soon. Temperatures read from CoreTemp.

For a Q6600 overclocked to 3.0ghz the temps are as follows.

Idle is 32c - hottest 2 cores, the other 2 cores are -1c
100% all cores - 52c on 2 cores and -1c on the other 2

For the Prime95 test Core #1 jumped up to 54c for about 3 seconds and then cooled back down to 52c. I don't think that this quick peak should count, but I thought I would mention it anyway.

With the AC7 Pro. Fan @100%
Idle 41c
100% all cores the temps hit 65c and were still climbing after only 1 hour. I shut it down at this point.

I'll add some stock temperatures soon.

There seems to be some variance from my old tests, and it is highly likely that I wasn't paying as close of attention as I should have. I'll be sticking with a single program for reading temps as well. I believe CoreTemp is close to dead on, since its numbers are exactly the same as HWMonitor. Unless some one would like to see the results from using different software.
 

Proximon

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I prefer Real Temp myself, but it's all just a matter of calibration. None of the programs read temp changes differently. It's just a matter of where they set the baseline.

Are you happy with your mounting method on the water block? That must have been difficult to get just right.
 

ir_efrem

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I used the same mounting bracket for the last water block that I made. I also used the same "penny method" to give a place for the dimple in the bracket a place to rest. It was not difficult at all, quite opposite in fact; it fell into place and the block of copper fit perfectly into the bracket itself.

No extra washers or springs, I just used what came with the kit. I'll post the link for it again. As you seen the kit came with all that I needed.
http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/lgboforulula.html
 

Proximon

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I see. The metal is actually thicker than it looks in the picture.
 

ir_efrem

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It has been a little while now and it is still running just as good as day 1.

Do you have any updates Shadow?

I plan on doing some more testing here pretty soon on my dual core as well. I don't really like the idea of tearing everything apart though. =P
 
^Yeah, I have been contacting a few places (Quickparts, MetroRP,Protocametc) for quotes for rapid proto typed water block top for a few designs (range from simple 15 jets to 150 jests) and prices range from $80 (50 jets) to $490 (235 jets ~1.11mm in diameter, can't build it due to restrictions in LGA775 keep out space). Still need to run flow simulations for most of the tops, but it looks promising. Most of the current designs that I'm trying are inspired by Cathar (builder of the Swiftech Storm; see: http://www.swiftnets.com/products/Storm.asp). Cather tried to CNC mill these back in the day but with today's advances in Rapid prototyping it's possible to build much more complex blocks than what Cather could do in the old times.
 

ir_efrem

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*gets out a defibrillator* CLEAR!

Just though I would mention that the JB Weld is still holding at 100% on the cheesy tupperware dish reservoir. It's holding brass to plastic, I suppose I can update/confirm that the epoxy is still holding well in a year as well. =P I have no doubt that it will be.

Wasn't that the challenge?

Anyhow all is well and good and the entire system has been running flawlessly the entire time. Coincidentally I have used a tad bit of phosphoric acid to change the PH of the water. I haven't tested the actual PH but it's not super strong and nothing is growing in my water (still using the same water).
 

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