Question My power supply cord is getting HOT

Xenioxx

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The cords connector leading into the psu (not the one close to the wall) is very hot, should I worry about this?
 

Darkbreeze

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Yes. You should definitely worry about it. That cord should NOT be hot.

There is either a problem with the PSU itself due to quality, age, lack of sufficient capacity, short somewhere, etc., OR, you are using a cord not intended or too small for the PSU.

What is the EXACT model of the power supply?

What are your full hardware specifications?

Are you using a power strip or plugging the PSU directly into the wall outlet?
 

Xenioxx

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Yes. You should definitely worry about it. That cord should NOT be hot.

There is either a problem with the PSU itself due to quality, age, lack of sufficient capacity, short somewhere, etc., OR, you are using a cord not intended or too small for the PSU.

What is the EXACT model of the power supply?

What are your full hardware specifications?

Are you using a power strip or plugging the PSU directly into the wall outlet?
It’s a corsair cx600 and it’s plugged into a power strip, and my specs are: gtx 1070 ti, ryzen 1600, and my mobo is a gigabyte ab350 gaming 3.
 

Xenioxx

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Yes, that is a sign something is wrong, that cord should not even get warm. I would try a different cord encase it has some internal damage. If the new cord gets hot I would suspect a psu fault.
That’s my only cord, where would I get a replacement from? Don’t want to potentially burn my house down due to a bad cord. If it helps it’s a corsair cx600
 
That’s my only cord, where would I get a replacement from? Don’t want to potentially burn my house down due to a bad cord. If it helps it’s a corsair cx600
In the UK they are a standard cord, nothing special. It’s the same used by a lot of kettles and other electronic devices. They are rated for far more power than any pc is going to take.

The CX600 is a low quality psu with a poor reputation. However I am not sure if it’s the cable or the psu with this issue.
 
PSU power cords are standard and a replacement should not be expensive.
You possibly have a cord without sufficient amperage capability and that is why it is getting warm.
Make certain that it is inserted fully into the PSU.
Also, a psu must be plugged into a grounded outlet.
Verify that your power strip is also grounded.

Lastly, I think yours is an older green unit which is not considered as reliable.
Consider replacing it sometime.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Get RID of the power strip, from this equation. Plug your PSU DIRECTLY INTO THE WALL.

Other devices such as external drives, monitors and printers can be plugged into the power strip, but it is not advisable to plug your power supply into one UNLESS you have a very high quality industrial type power strip like the higher end models sold by Tripp Lite, Eaton, Leviton, etc.

Years of experience using PC systems and having to diagnose bushels full of issues that a high number of ended up being faults with the circuitry inside the power strips. Primarily, cheap box store models but also a good number of supposedly premium power strip "surge protectors" that don't actually protect you from anything other than your own fear of what might happen if you actually end up needing a surge protector. A false sense of security.

Most people buy and use power strips because they THINK that the fact it says surge protector means something. Usually, it doesn't. This is one of my favorite quotes on the subject from an electrical engineer and residential/commercial electrical journeyman I know.

Buy a good one, but understand expensive does not equal good.

"Monster" brand are the low end junk that are sold for a premium price. Look for what us professionals use. Tripp-lite is one of my go to absolute favorites as they have a price to quality mix that is exceptional. The Belkin brand is junk as far as I am concerned as they focus on how it looks and not how it works. APC is also another one that I will trust , but they mostly cater to data centers and Corporate.

Lastly, if you really care about your electronics, get a Whole house surge suppressor installed in your electrical panel. Only a few hundred bucks and it protects everything including the overpriced LED lightbulbs that is all the rage these days.
APC, Tripp-Lite, Leviton, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric, Polyphaser, Ditek, Siemens, ABB, Square D, Intermatic, Cutler-Hammer (Eaton), and Syscom, these are the brands you can trust to have high quality internal electronics if you MUST use a power strip. Do not however use a power strip thinking that it offers significant protection, because even the best of them does not, not really. Whole house protection is the only real protection from surges.

Monster and Belkin, and a few others that are commonly used, almost unilaterally use the same protections in their 45 dollar surge protector strips as what you would find in an 8 dollar Amazon or Walmart branded model. And if you ever take one of these, or any cheap box store, dollar store (Even worse than these others usually BUT occasionally about the same) or Harbor Freight power strip apart you are likely to find frayed wires, poorly soldered connections with blobs of solder nearly touching crucial and potential short circuit points, super low quality MOVs, and a ton of other indicators that no real integrity was involved in the design or manufacturer of these units.

Another factor to keep in mind is that even with some of these high quality units, any protection that MIGHT be afforded, is usually the end of that product after one shot. This, directly from the Tripp-Lite manual for the #1 selling surge protection power strip in the world.

All models feature an internal protection that will disconnect the surge-protective component at the end of its useful life but will maintain power to the load now unprotected.
I believe many models from APC and a couple of the others I listed have now incorporated designs that permanently disengage any ability of the device to deliver power once a surge or short of significant enough caliber to incur the protection has occured. That basically means once there has been a surge or short, throw the device away. Even for high end models. Only whole house protection and properly earthed circuits offer any true protection from a serious surge or direct strike from lightning somewhere close enough to affect your segment of the grid.

And whatever you do, don't EVER buy any kind of extension cord, power strip or other electronic device with slip rings.



And while that is all good advice, and should be paid much attention, not just in one ear and out the other, I'd be very surprised if this wasn't more likely to be a case of some component directly shorting the PSU or the PSU itself being faulty. Since that PSU model hasn't been manufactured for a while now, it's clearly more than a few years old. Given the poor quality of those older CX600 units, it would be a really good idea to simply replace it NOW, before anything bad happens. The cord itself is not the problem UNLESS it has been damaged somehow by being cut or crushed or otherwise broken.
 

Xenioxx

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In the UK they are a standard cord, nothing special. It’s the same used by a lot of kettles and other electronic devices. They are rated for far more power than any pc is going to take.

The CX600 is a low quality psu with a poor reputation. However I am not sure if it’s the cable or the psu with this issue.
I literally can not get the power cord out of the psu i spent the last 30 minutes pulling on it hard and it won’t even budge. Am I screwed?
 

Xenioxx

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Jun 21, 2016
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Get RID of the power strip, from this equation. Plug your PSU DIRECTLY INTO THE WALL.

Other devices such as external drives, monitors and printers can be plugged into the power strip, but it is not advisable to plug your power supply into one UNLESS you have a very high quality industrial type power strip like the higher end models sold by Tripp Lite, Eaton, Leviton, etc.

Years of experience using PC systems and having to diagnose bushels full of issues that a high number of ended up being faults with the circuitry inside the power strips. Primarily, cheap box store models but also a good number of supposedly premium power strip "surge protectors" that don't actually protect you from anything other than your own fear of what might happen if you actually end up needing a surge protector. A false sense of security.

Most people buy and use power strips because they THINK that the fact it says surge protector means something. Usually, it doesn't. This is one of my favorite quotes on the subject from an electrical engineer and residential/commercial electrical journeyman I know.



APC, Tripp-Lite, Leviton, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric, Polyphaser, Ditek, Siemens, ABB, Square D, Intermatic, Cutler-Hammer (Eaton), and Syscom, these are the brands you can trust to have high quality internal electronics if you MUST use a power strip. Do not however use a power strip thinking that it offers significant protection, because even the best of them does not, not really. Whole house protection is the only real protection from surges.

Monster and Belkin, and a few others that are commonly used, almost unilaterally use the same protections in their 45 dollar surge protector strips as what you would find in an 8 dollar Amazon or Walmart branded model. And if you ever take one of these, or any cheap box store, dollar store (Even worse than these others usually BUT occasionally about the same) or Harbor Freight power strip apart you are likely to find frayed wires, poorly soldered connections with blobs of solder nearly touching crucial and potential short circuit points, super low quality MOVs, and a ton of other indicators that no real integrity was involved in the design or manufacturer of these units.

Another factor to keep in mind is that even with some of these high quality units, any protection that MIGHT be afforded, is usually the end of that product after one shot. This, directly from the Tripp-Lite manual for the #1 selling surge protection power strip in the world.



I believe many models from APC and a couple of the others I listed have now incorporated designs that permanently disengage any ability of the device to deliver power once a surge or short of significant enough caliber to incur the protection has occured. That basically means once there has been a surge or short, throw the device away. Even for high end models. Only whole house protection and properly earthed circuits offer any true protection from a serious surge or direct strike from lightning somewhere close enough to affect your segment of the grid.

And whatever you do, don't EVER buy any kind of extension cord, power strip or other electronic device with slip rings.



And while that is all good advice, and should be paid much attention, not just in one ear and out the other, I'd be very surprised if this wasn't more likely to be a case of some component directly shorting the PSU or the PSU itself being faulty. Since that PSU model hasn't been manufactured for a while now, it's clearly more than a few years old. Given the poor quality of those older CX600 units, it would be a really good idea to simply replace it NOW, before anything bad happens. The cord itself is not the problem UNLESS it has been damaged somehow by being cut or crushed or otherwise broken.
Yeah i’m pretty sure the cord is literally melted into the psu because i literally can’t get it out. What power supply would you recommend? around $70 if possible. Also need a 6 slot and a 8 slot pci-e cable on the psu.
 
What do you have inside that you need to power?
CPU/Motherboard and graphics card all play a part.
Look at the seasonic focus units, Yes, you will pay a bit more.
Do not buy a cheap psu.

A cheap PSU will be made of substandard components. It will not have safety and overload protections.
The danger is if it fails under load, it can destroy anything it is connected to.
It will deliver advertised power only at room temperatures, not at higher temperatures found when installed in a case.
The wattage will be delivered on the 3 and 5v rails, not on the 12v rails where modern parts
like the CPU and Graphics cards need it. What power is delivered may fluctuate and cause instability
issues that are hard to diagnose.
The fan will need to spin up higher to cool it, making it noisy.
A cheap PSU can become very expensive.

Do not buy one.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
And consider having an electrician or knowledgeable person open and inspect the wall outlet.

If things got hot enough to cause melting on the pc/psu end then some concern about the wall outlet is warranted. Stuff can melt in there as well.

Hopefully not as easily but best check to be sure.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
What country are you in?

Read this, for your own sake:


 

Xenioxx

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What country are you in?

Read this, for your own sake:


US, I decided to go with this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B017HA3SQ8/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_6dc-DbMGTR6JK
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That will work. There are better, but that one is good enough for most people. A good unit, even if it isn't among the best. I would not have an issue using a GQ in my own system if it was necessary. You could have chosen much, much worse.

Even so, I recommend as I said that you plug it directly into the wall socket.
 

Xenioxx

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That will work. There are better, but that one is good enough for most people. A good unit, even if it isn't among the best. I would not have an issue using a GQ in my own system if it was necessary. You could have chosen much, much worse.

Even so, I recommend as I said that you plug it directly into the wall socket.
Yeah I will, Is there a possibility that any other components are fried or messed up? I didn’t smell any burning plastic and there wasn’t an explosion so, I’m hoping i’m good
 

jonnyguru

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Yeah I will, Is there a possibility that any other components are fried or messed up? I didn’t smell any burning plastic and there wasn’t an explosion so, I’m hoping i’m good
Why would anything be fried?

You're talking about a WORKING PC with a melted power cord. Power cord is on the AC side. PC components are on the DC side.

Is this the power cord that actually came with the power supply? They shouldn't melt under normal use.

You really can't unplug the power cord from the back of the PSU? That's quite odd.
 
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Xenioxx

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Why would anything be fried?

You're talking about a WORKING PC with a melted power cord. Power cord is on the AC side. PC components are on the DC side.

Is this the power cord that actually came with the power supply? They shouldn't melt under normal use.

You really can't unplug the power cord from the back of the PSU? That's quite odd.
It honestly might have been a monitor power cord but not really sure as i set up the pc a year ago. And yeah I literally can’t get it out
 

jonnyguru

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It honestly might have been a monitor power cord but not really sure as i set up the pc a year ago. And yeah I literally can’t get it out
Yeah... monitors use less power than PCs, so if you mix up the cords, there may be a problem. The gauge of the wire in the monitor cord is going to be smaller, so it can deliver less power before getting hot and can only deliver so much power before getting critically hot. Best not to screw up and mix those power cords up.
 
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Darkbreeze

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You really can't unplug the power cord from the back of the PSU? That's quite odd.
It shouldn't really be THAT odd, since you and I (And others) participated in another thread not long ago where the same thing happened and when the member DID get the cord removed from the PSU, it left behind part of the plug in the socket. I don't believe it's actually all THAT unusual, despite the fact that we don't actually HEAR about it all that often. Likely, it's because people don't feel especially comfortable informing on themselves regarding the potentially questionable things they've done or failed to do, prior to the problem happening.

Certainly, it's not unique. I've encounted at least one instance myself of a system with a power cable that was about halfway melted into the socket on the back of the PSU and required a tremendous amount of effort to get out. I think I actually just ended up leaving it plugged in, cut the cord off and threw the whole thing in the trash so nobody else would ever try to use it, but honestly that's a dim memory in the distant past so I'd be lying if I said I remembered for certain.
 

Xenioxx

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It shouldn't really be THAT odd, since you and I (And others) participated in another thread not long ago where the same thing happened and when the member DID get the cord removed from the PSU, it left behind part of the plug in the socket. I don't believe it's actually all THAT unusual, despite the fact that we don't actually HEAR about it all that often. Likely, it's because people don't feel especially comfortable informing on themselves regarding the potentially questionable things they've done or failed to do, prior to the problem happening.

Certainly, it's not unique. I've encounted at least one instance myself of a system with a power cable that was about halfway melted into the socket on the back of the PSU and required a tremendous amount of effort to get out. I think I actually just ended up leaving it plugged in, cut the cord off and threw the whole thing in the trash so nobody else would ever try to use it, but honestly that's a dim memory in the distant past so I'd be lying if I said I remembered for certain.
The new psu comes tomorrow, anything else i should know besides no extension cords, power strips etc, and using the right cable this time? Also really hoping it doesn’t come DOA or anything..
 

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