My SSD just burned through 2 SATA cables

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kjthorpe18

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Feb 27, 2013
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I made a post earlier about BIOS not detecting my SSD, and after trying new cables, I looked down and there was smoke coming out of the data cable. I instantly shut it off and pulled out the plug, and I thought it was because of the cable. I tried another data cable and same result, but now I know my SSD is shot. Does anyone know what caused this, and what I can do to get my OS on one of my hard drives so I can still have a computer? My optical drive is still not recognized by BIOS.
 

nostall

Splendid
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Man, just read your other post. Sorry about the troubles.
This sounds like a bad mother board; like a voltage regulator(s) failed. It could be PSU related, too.
Open the case, pull the video card so you can see the motherboard clearly and start searching for damage. You already know it burns SATA cables, so start by those connections. You are especially looking for any scorching and burn marks.
Do NOT try to boot nor use that power supply: it very well could be the culprit; though there are a ton of them being used, the CX models only have a 3 yr. warranty and use lesser grade capacitors. If the mobo etc. are not yet damaged, don't risk damaging them.
And please excuse me if this is a stupid question: Are you sure it was the little SATA data cable that was smoking or was it the SATA power cable that was smoking????
Sorry, more potential bad news. If, in fact, your SSD is toast (pun intended) there is probably no way to get data from it.
You could look into professional data recovery if your information is critical, but that's going to cost a heckuva lot more then a new OEM copy of Windows and a different drive. Let's do the troubleshooting first, and repair as necessary, then worry about data recovery.
Should you discover that the problem is the PSU, I recommend you choose a replacement from Tiers 1, 2A , or 2B from this list:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-1804779/power-supply-unit-tier-list.html
Lastly, in this long reply (surprised no else has answered since you posted), some of your components may be under warranty - either with the etailer or manufacture - expecially the power supply. This might help if you have to replace components.
 

nostall

Splendid
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that is correct, the only hope would be if an overvolt did NOT completely destroy the SSD and that is something the manufacture and/or recovery service would have to determine.
 

kjthorpe18

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Sorry for replying so late, but yes, I'm sure it was the data cable as it has a hole burned in it. The SSD also had a red fluid on the metal connectors (could have been melted plastic as the cable looks a bit melted on the inside).
I think it could be the motherboard, though. Two screws seem to be missing to hold it in place and I think maybe it has a short?
I would have to buy a new windows license I guess, and I could just install it onto one of my hard drives. But if the power supply isn't the culprit, then the motherboard most likely is. I tried the old power supply, and still I could not recognize the optical drive.
 

nostall

Splendid
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My first question: Where are the two screws that are 'missing' ? Did you find them 'stuck' someplace on t he mobo or have they finally fallen to the bottom of the case? If they popped out while the PC was powered up they very well could have shorted something on their way to the bottom of the case.
2; Did you find any burned areas on the mobo, other then the SSD and cables?
3. If you have a Windows install disc, once you get the PC up-and-running you should use that disc to install Windows and if it won't let you activate it a call to Microsoft would be in order: explain what happened and they will probably allow you to activate the new install.
4. find someone with a multi-meter or invest in one your self. Corsair.com has a nice tutorial on how to use a paper-clip to check basic on/off/power of your PSU, and once you turn it on you can then use the multi-meter to check for correct voltages. If THAT shows the PSU as operating within specifications (with no real load), then you might be daring enough to ask some one to let you plug it into their PC and see if it runs it. BE VERY certain before you do this as you don't want to fry someone else's PC.
5. You are probably right about it being the motherboard; and until you get the PC to run you won't know what else it took. You could try "bread boarding" the mobo ie. remove from the case, place on a non-conductive surface, disconnect everything except your monitor(use integrated graphics), key board and mouse, and one stick of RAM (no hard drives, no video card, no other add-in cards). If it boots into the BIOS, then shut down and add one part at a time until you find the bad part. Remember, the PSU has to be checked out first, or use your old one.
6. Look into your parts' warranties.
 

kjthorpe18

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Feb 27, 2013
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Okay again, sorry for the late reply. I looked around the mobo and nothing seems to be burnt. The only things that weren't working were the SSD and optical drive. I'm getting a replacement PSU, and I'm currently working on getting a replacement SSD. I'm definitely going to call Microsoft to see what I can do about my OS, but I don't know where to call exactly.
 
Oct 17, 2021
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Okay again, sorry for the late reply. I looked around the mobo and nothing seems to be burnt. The only things that weren't working were the SSD and optical drive. I'm getting a replacement PSU, and I'm currently working on getting a replacement SSD. I'm definitely going to call Microsoft to see what I can do about my OS, but I don't know where to call exactly.

Hi, I hope you still read this thread. But I would like to know whether the change in PSU succeeded? Cuz I have this exact same problem now. Only the data SATA cable was melted, everything else was fine.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
A good way to solve a problem is to start a new thread with your exact problem, full details and a history of the problem, and the complete system specs.

A bad way to solve a problem is to necro a thread from nearly seven years ago.
 
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