Question NAS options: what is necessary? (Synology)

mStuff

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Hi, I am currently looking into getting a NAS server for general data and media storage.


From researching I have found Synology to be reviewed as the most flexible brand of NAS server, so I will be sticking to that.

I am planning on scaling it to 4x4TB drives in raid 5 and these are my options for the server hardware:

100USD -- (used) Synology DS414j
dual core, 512MB RAM
540USD -- (new) Synology DS418Play
dual core, 2GB RAM
640USD -- (new) Synology DS918+
quad core, 4GB RAM

As I am buying 4x WD Red 4TB harddrives for a combined 600USD, I would like to make sure they are not bottlenecked by the NAS hardware.

They all run the same version of OS (DSM 6.2.2), though how will the difference in specs be felt in the performance of the server?

I will mainly be using the server for media and data storage, but also ocationally for high speed caching storage for simulation softwares.

What would you recommend getting for a server that is hopefully going to last me a couple of years?

Thanks,
 
As most NAS units for home use are connected to 1 GbE ports, most are limited to 110 MB/sec reads/writes anyway...even 2 or 3 bay NAS units can saturate the typical 1 Gbps home network easily enough...

Pure storage/file dispensing/retrieval is not all that CPU intensive...

Do realize that although RAID 5 offers protection from a single drive failure, it is not recommended as much anymore with spinning drives over 1 TB in size, as quite often the heavy load on the drives 3 years later when/if rebuilding the RAID if a failure occurs often induces another drive failure,,leading to loss of all data.

Remember...RAID is not a backup...

Have your stuff stored elsewhere...just in case.
 

mStuff

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so as low as 512MB of ram with a very low powered ATOM dual core CPU like the DS414j is more than enough to not bottleneck in my use case?

In the case of NAS servers, what is improved performance then utilized for? I understand that the Synology servers are capable of video encoding - though is this the only performance-hungry case?

Thanks for the replies !
 

USAFRet

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so as low as 512MB of ram with a very low powered ATOM dual core CPU like the DS414j is more than enough to not bottleneck in my use case?

In the case of NAS servers, what is improved performance then utilized for? I understand that the Synology servers are capable of video encoding - though is this the only performance-hungry case?

Thanks for the replies !
My Qnap TS-453a came with 4GB.
I bought an 8GB stick to upgrade.

Having 2 RAM slots, I then figured...maybe 16GB? Why not try another 8GB stick.
It officially states it will only take 8GB, but the OS recognizes the full 16GB.
 

mStuff

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If I purchase an ASUS XG-U2008 (network switch) featuring 2 10Gb ethernet ports, will any NAS server be able to utilize those speeds? How fast will a raid5 setup with standard WD Reds be able to transfer, or is 10Gb overkill for this?
I am ready to spend extra money on this setup as I am confident that I will be using it in the future.

EDIT: Looking into their specs, it seems that they come with either one or two 1Gb ethernet ports, and not 10Gb ethernet.
I belive my router has a normal 1Gb ethernet, so a switch is probably unnecessary in my case
 
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USAFRet

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If I purchase an ASUS XG-U2008 (network switch) featuring 2 10Gb ethernet ports, will any NAS server be able to utilize those speeds? How fast will a raid5 setup with standard WD Reds be able to transfer, or is 10Gb overkill for this?
I am ready to spend extra money on this setup as I am confident that I will be using it in the future.
All devices in the chain would need to be 10GBe capable. NAS, switch, the ethernet adapter on the PC's...
In a typical home LAN, 10GBe is overkill.

How much data are you actually going to be moving around?
For instance, copying a 5GB ISO file from my NAS to a PC....45 sec.
 

mStuff

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Working with the simulation software (Houdini FX), a cache can quickly grow to many gigabytes, and loading these caches can take quite a while from my current internal HDD setup. The 10Gb speeds is not strictly necessary - I am just looking into the possibility.

EDIT: My current server motherboard, Z9PE-D16, does not have 10Gb ethernet internally, if it becomes relevant, I guess I will need to purchase a separate PCI-E network card
 
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If I purchase an ASUS XG-U2008 (network switch) featuring 2 10Gb ethernet ports, will any NAS server be able to utilize those speeds?
You NAS box then must have the same 10Gb port on it for both to talk to each other. 10Gb NAS box not cheap.

How fast will a raid5 setup with standard WD Reds be able to transfer, or is 10Gb overkill for this?
RAIDs are typically faster than single disc, and today single disk performance tops out ~1500 mbit, so 10Gb LAN will help, just depends whether you are ready to spend$$$ on it.
 

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