NEC Develops Batteries With 30% Greater Charge Densities

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archange

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According to the company, it has developed a prototype of a manganese lithium-ion battery that use cathodes to support higher voltages as well as a fluorinated electrolyte solution that is much more resistant to oxidation than the common carbonate-based solvents.
Not to nitpick, I'm cheering for more battery life as much as the next guy, but isn't that more toxic as well?
 

danwat1234

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retains 60% capacity? More research needed indeed. Reminds me of Envia and how they are making lithium batteries with more energy density, but of course the increased capacity doesn't hold after it's used x many cycles.
Nanowire lithium ion FTW?
 

danwat1234

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[citation][nom]srhelicity[/nom]If 113 F is room temperature, I don't want to be in that room![/citation]

Err, the battery would easily be up there if it's used with spirited driving in an electric/hybrid car, or in your pocket inside a smart phone, or in a laptop, pad..
 

memadmax

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This thing is either a dud or something is wrong with it.

"NEC noted that the technology only maintains about 80 percent of original capacity with 500 full charge and discharge cycles in conditions below room temperature (68 degrees F), while maintaining roughly 60% when above room temperature (113 degrees F)"

At this point, it isn't even ready to be a flashlight battery....
 

jeffunit

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"According to the company, it has developed a prototype of a manganese lithium-ion battery that use cathodes..."

How many cathodes does it have?
All batteries have a cathode and an anode.
Saying a battery uses cathodes is like saying that your power plug has neutrals and hots connectors.
 

coolcash1777

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[citation][nom]jeffunit[/nom]"According to the company, it has developed a prototype of a manganese lithium-ion battery that use cathodes..."How many cathodes does it have?All batteries have a cathode and an anode.Saying a battery uses cathodes is like saying that your power plug has neutrals and hots connectors.[/citation]

Batteries have many "cells" each of which has a anode and cathode (with electrolyte in the middle). The cells are stacked to produce the voltage and amperage required for the "battery."
 

jeffunit

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[citation][nom]coolcash1777[/nom]Batteries have many "cells" each of which has a anode and cathode (with electrolyte in the middle). The cells are stacked to produce the voltage and amperage required for the "battery."[/citation]

So how is it newsworthy that this battery uses cathodes?

Don't all batteries (with multiple cells) use cathodes?

How is it different than saying this battery has terminals or this battery produces voltage or this battery has anodes?
 

wiyosaya

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[citation][nom]jeffunit[/nom]So how is it newsworthy that this battery uses cathodes?Don't all batteries (with multiple cells) use cathodes?How is it different than saying this battery has terminals or this battery produces voltage or this battery has anodes?[/citation]
A battery is a collection of cells, and each cell has both an anode and a cathode. I was thinking that the fact that the battery uses cathodes is also not newsworthy since all batteries from the dawn of batteries and electrochemical cells use cathodes. The only thing that I can think is that Wolfgang left out a descriptive word. Either that, or his technomuse has the day off. :sol:
 

razor512

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Instead of li-ion they need to work on super capacitors which are better suited for electric cars.

Li-ion batteries have a very low charge cycle. In an all electric car the range is already a major issue, imagine losing 40% of that range after 2-3 years, and having to consider replacing the battery after 5 years or so (the most expensive part of the car)

super capacitors have been tested at 500,000+ charge/ discharge cycles with 0% loss in capacity, they just have a lower energy density than even led acid batteries (making it unfeasible to even use in a truck) but if they put more work on it they may be able to someday get that energy density levels close to that of li-ion batteries.

PS li-ion batteries in cars rarely go below room temperature. cars (eg the ford ones and the tesla ones, rely on active cooling to keep the battery from getting to a unsafe temperature. (if you have no plans to test drive a car, i recommend you test drive some of the electric cars (some car dealerships even give $5 giftcards for test driving a car and listening to a sales pitch) but anyway, test drive a electric car then ask to check the trunk and back seats (you will feel that those areas have gotten pretty warm, that is because li-ion batteries heat up while they are charging and also while they are discharging, and aggressive driving (eg harder acceleration, will heat the battery up very quickly)

In one way it is good for cold areas because you are less likely to be stuck with the cold temperature capacity issue, it also means a shorter lifespan for the car.

Remember, other than using different materials, you cant extend the life of a li-ion battery by much since it is a chemical reaction and chemistry shows that reactions have a limit which can be calculated. (and those calculations are basically the max you can ever hit)

 
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