[SOLVED] Need Fan Help Please!

Jul 7, 2020
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So im kind of confused with my fans in my pc, I have a Corsair Hydro Series H60 for my cpu, I then have a SILENTWING 3 PWM fan acting as the exhaust fan behind the radiator in the back, I then have 1 intake fan in the front its a Corsair PWM, the issue im having is that the exhaust fan is plugged into CHA1 and when I am in the BIOS system it only shows 500rpm on standard mode. While the Corsair intake fan on CHA2 is around 1000rpm on PWM mode as well. Why is that? When im playing games the temp gets to around 70-75C if someone help me out thank you!
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
Ah, you've added some new info, which causes me to think there's a better way here. But before proceeding, let me make sure I got all the facts right.

A. You have a Corsair H60 CPU cooler system. It has a PUMP unit mounted on the CPU, and that has a cable with THREE wires that you have plugged into the mobo CPU_FAN header. Then that system has its rad and fan, now mounted on the back of your case to blow air out. For the FAN on that rad, it has a cable with FOUR wires, and you have it plugged into the mobo CHA_FAN1 header.
B. Your mobo also has a SECOND chassis fan header, CHA_FAN2, and there you had just the one Silentwing PWM 4-pin fan plugged in. Recently you have added a third fan that has only 3 pins. Using a Splitter, it now shares the CHA_FAN2 header with the Silentwing unit, and you are setting the CHA_FAN 2 header to DC Mode.

IF that is ALL correct, then I suggest you change all the connections, and some of this may sound odd, but I will explain why it works better. HOWEVER, if ANYTHING above I have misunderstood, do not make any changes until you tell me what I got wrong!

We'll start with the whys and then get into details. With the H60 system, the design concept is that the PUMP should run full speed all the time, and control of the CPU internal temperature is done by changing only the speed of the FAN on the radiator. Now, the CPU_FAN header is unique in this way: it does its automatic control of its fan according to a temperature probe built into the CPU chip itself; hence, THIS is the header that REALLY should be used to control the speed of the RAD fan. But of course, the pump is already connected to this header. A further consideration: the CPU_FAN header pays close attention to the SPEED of its "fan" and will warn you rapidly (may even take some drastic action) if it FAILS (i.e., no speed). With any AIO cooler system, the critical component that MUST work is the PUMP, so you want to have the pump connected to the CPU_FAN header in such a way that is speed is fed there.

Case ventilation fans, on the other hand, should be connected to CHA_FAN headers because those use a different temperature sensor built into the motherboard. That also is why those headers are NOT good for the fan that cools the CPU chip. CHA_FAN headers usually also monitor their fan's speed signal for failure and will warn you in that event, but not take drastic actions. You appear to have two CHA_FAN headers, and two DIFFERENT fan types for case fans.

Now for the details.
  1. Disconnect all those fans and the pump. Move the Splitter to the CPU_FAN header. Look very closely at the two male (with pins) outputs of the Splitter, and you will see that one has all 4 of its pins, and the other has only three, with Pin #3 missing. Plug the PUMP unit into the output with all four pins, and the RAD FAN into the other. This will put both items under automatic speed control by the CPU_FAN header based on the internal temperature sensor in the CPU chip. BUT the PUMP will make use of a "quirk" in the design of the two different fan systems. When you mis-match and plug a 3-pin device (the pump) into a 4-pin header that IS using the new PWM Mode, it receives from Pin #2 a full 12 VDC supply constantly and does NOT receive (nor could it use) the PWM speed control signal from Pin #4. So it always runs full speed, just as it was designed to do. Meanwhile the 4-pin fan on the other output of the Splitter DOES get that PWM signal and its speed IS controlled. NOTE that, to make sure this works, you MUST go into BIOS Setup for the CPU_FAN header and set it to use that PWM Mode - NOT DC Mode, and NOT "automatic" self-tuning if that is an option. Also note that, because you connect the PUMP to the Splitter output with all its 4 pins, the PUMP is the unit that will send its speed signal back to the CPU_FAN header for FAILURE monitoring. Of course, that also means that, whenever you look at the BIOS read-out for CPU Fan speed, it really will be the PUMP that is always running full speed, and you will never see the speed of the fan on the Rad.
  2. Now, connect the Silentwing 4-pin fan to the CHA_FAN1 header and ensure that its configuration is set to PWM Mode (ideal for this fan).
  3. Connect the new 3-pin fan to the CHA_FAN2 header, and configure it to use DC Mode.
  4. As far as the temperature control strategy or "Profile" for the two CHA_FAN headers, make then the same so those two fans will do essentially the same thing. Because they are different models, their speeds will NOT match generally, but they will perform very much alike.
 
Reactions: mkaafy

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
PWM signal is a PERCENTAGE of on/off, at full 12v. This will be based on your configuration, fan curve, as set in the BIOS. You can use a preset or most boards these days allow you to set a custom fan profile/curve.

Fans that have different maximum RPM figures will have different speeds at the same fan curve. So a fan that has a maximum of 1500rpm will run at 750rpm when it is set to 50% PWM signal at a given temperature.

One that has only a 1000rpm maximum speed will only be running at 500rpm at the same speed and temperature, assuming they are both using the SAME SOURCE for temperature control and you need to pay attention to that because most modern boards allow you to set different sources such as CPU, VRM, system/motherboard, chipset, GPU etc. and each header might, by default, have different source settings. Two identical fans set to the same fan curve will operate at entirely different RPMs if one of them is using the CPU thermal sensor as the source while the other one is using the chipset or motherboard/system thermal diode.

Where is your radiator mounted, in the rear? Which fan are you using on the radiator? Are those the ONLY two fans installed in the system?

What case do you have, in fact, what are your FULL hardware specifications?
 
Reactions: Mrsteno2000
Jul 7, 2020
17
0
10
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PWM signal is a PERCENTAGE of on/off, at full 12v. This will be based on your configuration, fan curve, as set in the BIOS. You can use a preset or most boards these days allow you to set a custom fan profile/curve.

Fans that have different maximum RPM figures will have different speeds at the same fan curve. So a fan that has a maximum of 1500rpm will run at 750rpm when it is set to 50% PWM signal at a given temperature.

One that has only a 1000rpm maximum speed will only be running at 500rpm at the same speed and temperature, assuming they are both using the SAME SOURCE for temperature control and you need to pay attention to that because most modern boards allow you to set different sources such as CPU, VRM, system/motherboard, chipset, GPU etc. and each header might, by default, have different source settings. Two identical fans set to the same fan curve will operate at entirely different RPMs if one of them is using the CPU thermal sensor as the source while the other one is using the chipset or motherboard/system thermal diode.

Where is your radiator mounted, in the rear? Which fan are you using on the radiator? Are those the ONLY two fans installed in the system?

What case do you have, in fact, what are your FULL hardware specifications?
My radiator is mounted in the back im using this fan behind the radiator as an exhaust fan https://www.bequiet.com/en/casefans/722

Yes those are the only 2 fans installed in the system

My specifications are all here on best buy
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/ibuypower-desktop-intel-core-i7-7700-16gb-memory-nvidia-geforce-gtx-1060-120gb-solid-state-drive-1tb-hard-drive-gray-black/6032004.p?skuId=6032004
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
First thing you should do is put the Corsair fan BACK on the radiator. It has much higher static pressure than that silent wings 3, and I would install it with the radiator up against the case in the rear exhaust fan location with the fan PUSHING air through the radiator and on out the case as an exhaust. If you do a google image search for H60 you will see basically every installation has it that way, besides which, we already know that is the way that cooler works best anyhow.

Move the Silent wings 3 to the front of the case as an intake. Make sure both fans are correctly facing. The fan blade side of each fan should be facing towards the front of the case. There should be arrows on the fan housing to indicate the direction of airflow if in doubt.

Then, I'd add a second front intake and a top rear exhaust, to assist with cooling. That can be done at any later date but obviously your radiator is only able to cool as well as how much ambient air you are getting INTO the case, and with only one intake fan you are not getting much ambient air in.

You are also not getting much of the hot air trapped inside the top of the case out, without another exhaust fan up there.
 
Reactions: Mrsteno2000
Jul 7, 2020
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First thing you should do is put the Corsair fan BACK on the radiator. It has much higher static pressure than that silent wings 3, and I would install it with the radiator up against the case in the rear exhaust fan location with the fan PUSHING air through the radiator and on out the case as an exhaust. If you do a google image search for H60 you will see basically every installation has it that way, besides which, we already know that is the way that cooler works best anyhow.

Move the Silent wings 3 to the front of the case as an intake. Make sure both fans are correctly facing. The fan blade side of each fan should be facing towards the front of the case. There should be arrows on the fan housing to indicate the direction of airflow if in doubt.

Then, I'd add a second front intake and a top rear exhaust, to assist with cooling. That can be done at any later date but obviously your radiator is only able to cool as well as how much ambient air you are getting INTO the case, and with only one intake fan you are not getting much ambient air in.

You are also not getting much of the hot air trapped inside the top of the case out, without another exhaust fan up there.
Okay I will switch the fans then and put the silent wing in the front as an intake, my other question is I only have 2 fan ports on the motherboard, so I bought a fan splitter cable on amazon to be able to use an extra fan so I will have 2 intakes and 1 exhaust BUT when I use the splitter one of the fans is 4 Pin and the other is 3 pin so what setting do I use in the bios settings when both fans are connected to the same splitter PWM or DC mode since they are two different fans?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No, NOT "in the front as an exhaust".

If you have the front fan configured as an exhaust, that is a big problem. Probably your ENTIRE problem. Front, bottom or side fan locations should ALWAYS be oriented as intake fans for any standard tower case.

Rear and top locations should always be configured as exhaust, for any standard tower case.

Make the front an intake, the rear an exhaust, and make the exhaust fan PUSHING through the radiator, not pulling. Both will work, but the high static pressure of the Corsair fan that radiator came with was designed to be used for pushing through the radiator. That's WHY it has a high static pressure design.
 
Reactions: Mrsteno2000
Jul 7, 2020
17
0
10
0
No, NOT "in the front as an exhaust".

If you have the front fan configured as an exhaust, that is a big problem. Probably your ENTIRE problem. Front, bottom or side fan locations should ALWAYS be oriented as intake fans for any standard tower case.

Rear and top locations should always be configured as exhaust, for any standard tower case.

Make the front an intake, the rear an exhaust, and make the exhaust fan PUSHING through the radiator, not pulling. Both will work, but the high static pressure of the Corsair fan that radiator came with was designed to be used for pushing through the radiator. That's WHY it has a high static pressure design.
I know that I wrote exhaust on accident I meant intake fan, but would you be able to help me on my other question about using the fan splitter?
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
You had two fans in total. One came with the Corsair H60 CPU cooler system and now will be mounted on the radiator blowing air out the back of your case. I expect it is plugged into your mobo CPU_FAN header. Right?

Your other fan, a Silentwing 3 PWM model, now will be mounted at the front as an intake, and plugged into the ONLY mobo CHA_FAN header, right? Now you want to add a third fan and connect it along with the Silentwing unit to that same CHA_FAN header using a Splitter because there is no other header. You mis-matched things. 3-pin fans and 4-pin fans require different methods of controlling their speed, and you can only choose one method for the header Mode. Luckily for you, the new 4-pin fan design has a backwards compatibility feature. It CAN have its speed controlled by either Mode setting, even though PWM is optimal for it. So set your CHA_FAN header to use the older Voltage Control Mode (aka DC Mode) and that should put both of these fans under automatic speed control.
 
Jul 7, 2020
17
0
10
0
You had two fans in total. One came with the Corsair H60 CPU cooler system and now will be mounted on the radiator blowing air out the back of your case. I expect it is plugged into your mobo CPU_FAN header. Right?

Your other fan, a Silentwing 3 PWM model, now will be mounted at the front as an intake, and plugged into the ONLY mobo CHA_FAN header, right? Now you want to add a third fan and connect it along with the Silentwing unit to that same CHA_FAN header using a Splitter because there is no other header. You mis-matched things. 3-pin fans and 4-pin fans require different methods of controlling their speed, and you can only choose one method for the header Mode. Luckily for you, the new 4-pin fan design has a backwards compatibility feature. It CAN have its speed controlled by either Mode setting, even though PWM is optimal for it. So set your CHA_FAN header to use the older Voltage Control Mode (aka DC Mode) and that should put both of these fans under automatic speed control.
Gotcha and yes correct I plugged the H60 into the cpu header and then have the fan that came with it pushing the air through the radiator plugged into CHA1 and then yes I added the silent wing and another fan as intakes in the front and have them connected through the splitter and yes the silent-wing is 4 pin and the other fan is 3 pin and I just wasn't sure if I should have it on DC mode or PWM in the bios since both of the fans are connected with the splitter. But I will now have them on DC mode. Thank you replying back!! Im new to all of this sorry for all the questions
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
Ah, you've added some new info, which causes me to think there's a better way here. But before proceeding, let me make sure I got all the facts right.

A. You have a Corsair H60 CPU cooler system. It has a PUMP unit mounted on the CPU, and that has a cable with THREE wires that you have plugged into the mobo CPU_FAN header. Then that system has its rad and fan, now mounted on the back of your case to blow air out. For the FAN on that rad, it has a cable with FOUR wires, and you have it plugged into the mobo CHA_FAN1 header.
B. Your mobo also has a SECOND chassis fan header, CHA_FAN2, and there you had just the one Silentwing PWM 4-pin fan plugged in. Recently you have added a third fan that has only 3 pins. Using a Splitter, it now shares the CHA_FAN2 header with the Silentwing unit, and you are setting the CHA_FAN 2 header to DC Mode.

IF that is ALL correct, then I suggest you change all the connections, and some of this may sound odd, but I will explain why it works better. HOWEVER, if ANYTHING above I have misunderstood, do not make any changes until you tell me what I got wrong!

We'll start with the whys and then get into details. With the H60 system, the design concept is that the PUMP should run full speed all the time, and control of the CPU internal temperature is done by changing only the speed of the FAN on the radiator. Now, the CPU_FAN header is unique in this way: it does its automatic control of its fan according to a temperature probe built into the CPU chip itself; hence, THIS is the header that REALLY should be used to control the speed of the RAD fan. But of course, the pump is already connected to this header. A further consideration: the CPU_FAN header pays close attention to the SPEED of its "fan" and will warn you rapidly (may even take some drastic action) if it FAILS (i.e., no speed). With any AIO cooler system, the critical component that MUST work is the PUMP, so you want to have the pump connected to the CPU_FAN header in such a way that is speed is fed there.

Case ventilation fans, on the other hand, should be connected to CHA_FAN headers because those use a different temperature sensor built into the motherboard. That also is why those headers are NOT good for the fan that cools the CPU chip. CHA_FAN headers usually also monitor their fan's speed signal for failure and will warn you in that event, but not take drastic actions. You appear to have two CHA_FAN headers, and two DIFFERENT fan types for case fans.

Now for the details.
  1. Disconnect all those fans and the pump. Move the Splitter to the CPU_FAN header. Look very closely at the two male (with pins) outputs of the Splitter, and you will see that one has all 4 of its pins, and the other has only three, with Pin #3 missing. Plug the PUMP unit into the output with all four pins, and the RAD FAN into the other. This will put both items under automatic speed control by the CPU_FAN header based on the internal temperature sensor in the CPU chip. BUT the PUMP will make use of a "quirk" in the design of the two different fan systems. When you mis-match and plug a 3-pin device (the pump) into a 4-pin header that IS using the new PWM Mode, it receives from Pin #2 a full 12 VDC supply constantly and does NOT receive (nor could it use) the PWM speed control signal from Pin #4. So it always runs full speed, just as it was designed to do. Meanwhile the 4-pin fan on the other output of the Splitter DOES get that PWM signal and its speed IS controlled. NOTE that, to make sure this works, you MUST go into BIOS Setup for the CPU_FAN header and set it to use that PWM Mode - NOT DC Mode, and NOT "automatic" self-tuning if that is an option. Also note that, because you connect the PUMP to the Splitter output with all its 4 pins, the PUMP is the unit that will send its speed signal back to the CPU_FAN header for FAILURE monitoring. Of course, that also means that, whenever you look at the BIOS read-out for CPU Fan speed, it really will be the PUMP that is always running full speed, and you will never see the speed of the fan on the Rad.
  2. Now, connect the Silentwing 4-pin fan to the CHA_FAN1 header and ensure that its configuration is set to PWM Mode (ideal for this fan).
  3. Connect the new 3-pin fan to the CHA_FAN2 header, and configure it to use DC Mode.
  4. As far as the temperature control strategy or "Profile" for the two CHA_FAN headers, make then the same so those two fans will do essentially the same thing. Because they are different models, their speeds will NOT match generally, but they will perform very much alike.
 
Reactions: mkaafy
Jul 7, 2020
17
0
10
0
Ah, you've added some new info, which causes me to think there's a better way here. But before proceeding, let me make sure I got all the facts right.

A. You have a Corsair H60 CPU cooler system. It has a PUMP unit mounted on the CPU, and that has a cable with THREE wires that you have plugged into the mobo CPU_FAN header. Then that system has its rad and fan, now mounted on the back of your case to blow air out. For the FAN on that rad, it has a cable with FOUR wires, and you have it plugged into the mobo CHA_FAN1 header.
B. Your mobo also has a SECOND chassis fan header, CHA_FAN2, and there you had just the one Silentwing PWM 4-pin fan plugged in. Recently you have added a third fan that has only 3 pins. Using a Splitter, it now shares the CHA_FAN2 header with the Silentwing unit, and you are setting the CHA_FAN 2 header to DC Mode.

IF that is ALL correct, then I suggest you change all the connections, and some of this may sound odd, but I will explain why it works better. HOWEVER, if ANYTHING above I have misunderstood, do not make any changes until you tell me what I got wrong!

We'll start with the whys and then get into details. With the H60 system, the design concept is that the PUMP should run full speed all the time, and control of the CPU internal temperature is done by changing only the speed of the FAN on the radiator. Now, the CPU_FAN header is unique in this way: it does its automatic control of its fan according to a temperature probe built into the CPU chip itself; hence, THIS is the header that REALLY should be used to control the speed of the RAD fan. But of course, the pump is already connected to this header. A further consideration: the CPU_FAN header pays close attention to the SPEED of its "fan" and will warn you rapidly (may even take some drastic action) if it FAILS (i.e., no speed). With any AIO cooler system, the critical component that MUST work is the PUMP, so you want to have the pump connected to the CPU_FAN header in such a way that is speed is fed there.

Case ventilation fans, on the other hand, should be connected to CHA_FAN headers because those use a different temperature sensor built into the motherboard. That also is why those headers are NOT good for the fan that cools the CPU chip. CHA_FAN headers usually also monitor their fan's speed signal for failure and will warn you in that event, but not take drastic actions. You appear to have two CHA_FAN headers, and two DIFFERENT fan types for case fans.

Now for the details.
  1. Disconnect all those fans and the pump. Move the Splitter to the CPU_FAN header. Look very closely at the two male (with pins) outputs of the Splitter, and you will see that one has all 4 of its pins, and the other has only three, with Pin #3 missing. Plug the PUMP unit into the output with all four pins, and the RAD FAN into the other. This will put both items under automatic speed control by the CPU_FAN header based on the internal temperature sensor in the CPU chip. BUT the PUMP will make use of a "quirk" in the design of the two different fan systems. When you mis-match and plug a 3-pin device (the pump) into a 4-pin header that IS using the new PWM Mode, it receives from Pin #2 a full 12 VDC supply constantly and does NOT receive (nor could it use) the PWM speed control signal from Pin #4. So it always runs full speed, just as it was designed to do. Meanwhile the 4-pin fan on the other output of the Splitter DOES get that PWM signal and its speed IS controlled. NOTE that, to make sure this works, you MUST go into BIOS Setup for the CPU_FAN header and set it to use that PWM Mode - NOT DC Mode, and NOT "automatic" self-tuning if that is an option. Also note that, because you connect the PUMP to the Splitter output with all its 4 pins, the PUMP is the unit that will send its speed signal back to the CPU_FAN header for FAILURE monitoring. Of course, that also means that, whenever you look at the BIOS read-out for CPU Fan speed, it really will be the PUMP that is always running full speed, and you will never see the speed of the fan on the Rad.
  2. Now, connect the Silentwing 4-pin fan to the CHA_FAN1 header and ensure that its configuration is set to PWM Mode (ideal for this fan).
  3. Connect the new 3-pin fan to the CHA_FAN2 header, and configure it to use DC Mode.
  4. As far as the temperature control strategy or "Profile" for the two CHA_FAN headers, make then the same so those two fans will do essentially the same thing. Because they are different models, their speeds will NOT match generally, but they will perform very much alike.
You were accurate on everything and I just did exactly what you said I put the pump into the 4 pin splitter and the rad fan into the 3 pin splitter, I then put the silent wing into CHA1 on standard PWM mode and the 3 pin fan in CHA2 on standard DC mode, I also put the CPU on standard mode with PWM so I hope this works out thank you!
 
Jul 7, 2020
17
0
10
0
Ah, you've added some new info, which causes me to think there's a better way here. But before proceeding, let me make sure I got all the facts right.

A. You have a Corsair H60 CPU cooler system. It has a PUMP unit mounted on the CPU, and that has a cable with THREE wires that you have plugged into the mobo CPU_FAN header. Then that system has its rad and fan, now mounted on the back of your case to blow air out. For the FAN on that rad, it has a cable with FOUR wires, and you have it plugged into the mobo CHA_FAN1 header.
B. Your mobo also has a SECOND chassis fan header, CHA_FAN2, and there you had just the one Silentwing PWM 4-pin fan plugged in. Recently you have added a third fan that has only 3 pins. Using a Splitter, it now shares the CHA_FAN2 header with the Silentwing unit, and you are setting the CHA_FAN 2 header to DC Mode.

IF that is ALL correct, then I suggest you change all the connections, and some of this may sound odd, but I will explain why it works better. HOWEVER, if ANYTHING above I have misunderstood, do not make any changes until you tell me what I got wrong!

We'll start with the whys and then get into details. With the H60 system, the design concept is that the PUMP should run full speed all the time, and control of the CPU internal temperature is done by changing only the speed of the FAN on the radiator. Now, the CPU_FAN header is unique in this way: it does its automatic control of its fan according to a temperature probe built into the CPU chip itself; hence, THIS is the header that REALLY should be used to control the speed of the RAD fan. But of course, the pump is already connected to this header. A further consideration: the CPU_FAN header pays close attention to the SPEED of its "fan" and will warn you rapidly (may even take some drastic action) if it FAILS (i.e., no speed). With any AIO cooler system, the critical component that MUST work is the PUMP, so you want to have the pump connected to the CPU_FAN header in such a way that is speed is fed there.

Case ventilation fans, on the other hand, should be connected to CHA_FAN headers because those use a different temperature sensor built into the motherboard. That also is why those headers are NOT good for the fan that cools the CPU chip. CHA_FAN headers usually also monitor their fan's speed signal for failure and will warn you in that event, but not take drastic actions. You appear to have two CHA_FAN headers, and two DIFFERENT fan types for case fans.

Now for the details.
  1. Disconnect all those fans and the pump. Move the Splitter to the CPU_FAN header. Look very closely at the two male (with pins) outputs of the Splitter, and you will see that one has all 4 of its pins, and the other has only three, with Pin #3 missing. Plug the PUMP unit into the output with all four pins, and the RAD FAN into the other. This will put both items under automatic speed control by the CPU_FAN header based on the internal temperature sensor in the CPU chip. BUT the PUMP will make use of a "quirk" in the design of the two different fan systems. When you mis-match and plug a 3-pin device (the pump) into a 4-pin header that IS using the new PWM Mode, it receives from Pin #2 a full 12 VDC supply constantly and does NOT receive (nor could it use) the PWM speed control signal from Pin #4. So it always runs full speed, just as it was designed to do. Meanwhile the 4-pin fan on the other output of the Splitter DOES get that PWM signal and its speed IS controlled. NOTE that, to make sure this works, you MUST go into BIOS Setup for the CPU_FAN header and set it to use that PWM Mode - NOT DC Mode, and NOT "automatic" self-tuning if that is an option. Also note that, because you connect the PUMP to the Splitter output with all its 4 pins, the PUMP is the unit that will send its speed signal back to the CPU_FAN header for FAILURE monitoring. Of course, that also means that, whenever you look at the BIOS read-out for CPU Fan speed, it really will be the PUMP that is always running full speed, and you will never see the speed of the fan on the Rad.
  2. Now, connect the Silentwing 4-pin fan to the CHA_FAN1 header and ensure that its configuration is set to PWM Mode (ideal for this fan).
  3. Connect the new 3-pin fan to the CHA_FAN2 header, and configure it to use DC Mode.
  4. As far as the temperature control strategy or "Profile" for the two CHA_FAN headers, make then the same so those two fans will do essentially the same thing. Because they are different models, their speeds will NOT match generally, but they will perform very much alike.
And just to clarify the H60 fan should be in front of the RAD acting as an exhaust right, not behind it?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
IDK man, I think paperdoc might be a pretty smart guy. Kind of reminds me of a Tom's hardware version of Pinky and the brain, where he is the brain. I think Pinky is around here on the mod crew somewhere but I won't say who I think that is. LOL.

Or maybe the character Peabody. That might be more accurate. :)
 
Reactions: Headonastick

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Mr Peabody for sure. Maybe Pherb. That studious, quiet type always willing to slap a 3ft tall stack of research papers under your nose, just give him a minute to find it all. Me, I'm more like Phineas, hands on genius, can figure a way to get anything done, but research definitely not my thing. I suspect Darkbreeze is somewhat like that too. There are different kinds of smart, not just bookworms.
 

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