Question NEED HELP ASAP!! How to fix no display on monitor when everything in the PC turns on?

Dec 24, 2019
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I have a relatively new build, it worked fine up until today. I have an AMD Ryzen 5 2600 processor with an ASUS B450 Prime AMD Ryzen 2 motherboard, Crucial Ballistix sport LT 2666 MHz DDR4 RAM, and an MSI Radeon RX 580 graphics card. I was having a problem with my RAM (it was only detecting 4GB instead of all 8) so I powered off my PC and unplugged it and reseated my RAM. After doing so, I went to turn my PC back on but am not getting a display on my monitor. Everything turns on, graphics card, processor, fans, and I even get the lights on my motherboard, but nothing comes up on the screen. And also, my mouse and WiFi adapter are plugged into my motherboard but neither are coming on. It’s like the motherboard isn’t reading that they are plugged in. Can someone please, please help me. I payed almost $1000 and waited over a month for all of my parts and only got about 4-5 days of playtime. I want to avoid having to buy new parts but if it comes down to it then I guess I’ll have to. Can anyone please help me with this???
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
My recommendation would be that you get a tube of thermal paste, if you do not already have some, and then remove the CPU cooler, CPU and memory. Clean the bottom of the CPU cooler and top of the CPU, removing all traces of thermal interface material using isopropyl alcohol, then check closely on the CPU for any signs of bent pins. Bent pins on the CPU (Or on the motherboard for Intel systems) is a high percentage cause of memory and random or no display issues.

If you happened to unplug the monitor from the PC while you were working on it, make sure you plugged the display cable back into the graphics card and not the video output on the motherboard by mistake. Easy mistake, done by many of us at one time or another.

If the pins on the CPU and the CPU socket itself on the motherboard look fine, and you might need to to use some kind of magnifying glass or high powered reading glasses to get a good look, but if they are fine, then apply fresh paste and reinstall the CPU.

Reinstall the memory making SURE to align the notch in the slot with the relief in the memory module itself, and FULLY seat the memory until the lock at one end (Or both ends for models with locks at both ends of the DIMM slot) click into place into the cutout in the end of the DIMM.

Try to POST. If you still get no love, try doing a hard reset of the BIOS as follows.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
 

onespeedbiker

Respectable
Apr 13, 2019
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Have you tried resetting your memory again? If not do so. Also, your MB has 4 DIMM slots; make sure you are using the correct slots when two sticks of RAM are installed (assuming you have 2). Your manual labels them A1,A2,B1,B2 and says to use A2 and B2 when using 2 RAM stacks.

I would also try booting with only only one ram stick and then the other. and disable fast startup https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/4189-turn-off-fast-startup-windows-10-a.html
 
Last edited:
Dec 24, 2019
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Have you tried resetting your memory again? If not do so. Also, your MB has 4 DIMM slots; make sure you are using the correct slots when two sticks of RAM are installed (assuming you have 2). Your manual labels them A1,A2,B1,B2 and says to use A2 and B2 when using 2 RAM stacks.

I would also try booting with only only one ram stick and then the other. and disable fast startup https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/4189-turn-off-fast-startup-windows-10-a.html
I haven’t tried reseating the memory again. I had a friend build it for me as I am new to PC and am still understanding how it all works. I figured it would just be best to wait until he could take a look at it as I don’t want to mess anything up any further by doing it myself. I had my brother look at it and he is almost certainly sure that it’s a RAM issue. Although, like I said I’m still trying to understand how all this PC stuff works and don’t know if he is correct or not. But I will definitely have my buddy try this method.
 
Dec 24, 2019
14
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10
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My recommendation would be that you get a tube of thermal paste, if you do not already have some, and then remove the CPU cooler, CPU and memory. Clean the bottom of the CPU cooler and top of the CPU, removing all traces of thermal interface material using isopropyl alcohol, then check closely on the CPU for any signs of bent pins. Bent pins on the CPU (Or on the motherboard for Intel systems) is a high percentage cause of memory and random or no display issues.

If you happened to unplug the monitor from the PC while you were working on it, make sure you plugged the display cable back into the graphics card and not the video output on the motherboard by mistake. Easy mistake, done by many of us at one time or another.

If the pins on the CPU and the CPU socket itself on the motherboard look fine, and you might need to to use some kind of magnifying glass or high powered reading glasses to get a good look, but if they are fine, then apply fresh paste and reinstall the CPU.

Reinstall the memory making SURE to align the notch in the slot with the relief in the memory module itself, and FULLY seat the memory until the lock at one end (Or both ends for models with locks at both ends of the DIMM slot) click into place into the cutout in the end of the DIMM.

Try to POST. If you still get no love, try doing a hard reset of the BIOS as follows.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
Hmm, my brother keeps telling me it’s a RAM issue but it could be a CPU issue as well. I’m new to PC and don’t really understand how all this works so I had a friend of mine build the PC for me and if there’s a problem I get him to look at it. I tried to reseat the RAM myself cause, how hard could it be, right? I did this and no display pops up although, before I touched the RAM the PC would still boot up even though it was only reading one stick of RAM. My CPU fan comes on as does the graphics card and my other fans along with the light on the motherboard so all of this has to be fine, right? Although I don’t think it’s a CPU issue, I’ll still definitely have my buddy use this method and check to make sure everything is fine. Thank you for your help!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
These are slots your memory SHOULD be installed in. If they are not installed there, then move them. If they are installed there, remove them anyhow and then reinstall them, to make sure they are fully seated and correctly installed as I outlined in my earlier post.

 
Dec 24, 2019
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These are slots your memory SHOULD be installed in. If they are not installed there, then move them. If they are installed there, remove them anyhow and then reinstall them, to make sure they are fully seated and correctly installed as I outlined in my earlier post.

Yep, this is exactly how they are sitting right now.
 
Dec 24, 2019
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🤣

You might be surprised how difficult, or tricky, the simplest seeming things can be. Take nothing for granted and when in doubt, double or triple check and be sure to ask questions anytime you are not 100% sure about what you OR somebody else, is doing.
In all reality I guess I should’ve waited for the person who knows what they’re doing to come and take a look at it and handle any work that had to be done themselves. I’m just very impatient and excited to be able to play the pc. But you are definitely correct about double checking. It’s something I should’ve done before I even started playing on it. Had I double checked I would’ve seen that one of the RAM sticks was not being read and it could’ve been taken care of properly and then I probably wouldn’t be in this situation :/
 
Dec 24, 2019
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🤣

You might be surprised how difficult, or tricky, the simplest seeming things can be. Take nothing for granted and when in doubt, double or triple check and be sure to ask questions anytime you are not 100% sure about what you OR somebody else, is doing.
But like you said, it could be a CPU issue as well.
 

ZorakXT

Honorable
Jan 3, 2015
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But like you said, it could be a CPU issue as well.
Could just be a RAM thing. Something similar happened to me the other day when I moved my RAM as it wasn't installed properly; I had put them right next to each other (also saw a decent increase in performance in games after this since it was properly installed).

The way I fixed it was by resetting the CMOS. Check your manual, there should be a CMOS button or certain connection to disconnect to reset the default settings in your motherboard. Remember to first unplug your computer and turn the switch off.

The problem may be that your computer is trying to boot into the old way it was setup instead of the current. Therefore resetting the BIOS to default and clearing the memory should help. Alternatively you can try what the first person said about removing the battery.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
RAM as it wasn't installed properly; I had put them right next to each other (also saw a decent increase in performance in games after this since it was properly installed).
This is completely wrong. 100%. It is NEVER better to put memory modules right next to each other. You will never get any kind of multi channel operation that way, unless of course it's because all other DIMM slots are populated, so you'll never have optimal performance. There are NO, ZERO, consumer motherboards that use a dual, triple or quad memory architecture and DDR3 or DDR4 that I am aware of (And I've looked, extensively, for a very long time, for some oddball board that might. There are none.) that put a pair of DIMMs right next to each other AND in dual channel (Or triple, or quad). None.

If you put your DIMMs next to each other, it might work (And on a lot of systems, it might not EVEN work, at all), but you will be cutting your potential bandwidth in half by doing so. There are no exceptions to this, especially not on any high density DDR3 system, or on any DDR4 system period.

I realize you might just be trying to help, but you need to make sure you know what you are talking about before you start giving advice and in this case, you don't. Listen, learn, read, ask questions, and then when you have gained enough experience and knowledge to speak without reservation because you KNOW what you are talking about, THEN make recommendations or offer advice. Doing otherwise is just asking to get slammed for putting your foot in your mouth, like you just did.

Not a big deal really, you'll learn from it, but mainly it's just not helpful to somebody looking to solve an issue and getting advice that is not based in reality.
 

ZorakXT

Honorable
Jan 3, 2015
12
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This is completely wrong. 100%. It is NEVER better to put memory modules right next to each other. You will never get any kind of multi channel operation that way, unless of course it's because all other DIMM slots are populated, so you'll never have optimal performance. There are NO, ZERO, consumer motherboards that use a dual, triple or quad memory architecture and DDR3 or DDR4 that I am aware of (And I've looked, extensively, for a very long time, for some oddball board that might. There are none.) that put a pair of DIMMs right next to each other AND in dual channel (Or triple, or quad). None.

If you put your DIMMs next to each other, it might work (And on a lot of systems, it might not EVEN work, at all), but you will be cutting your potential bandwidth in half by doing so. There are no exceptions to this, especially not on any high density DDR3 system, or on any DDR4 system period.

I realize you might just be trying to help, but you need to make sure you know what you are talking about before you start giving advice and in this case, you don't. Listen, learn, read, ask questions, and then when you have gained enough experience and knowledge to speak without reservation because you KNOW what you are talking about, THEN make recommendations or offer advice. Doing otherwise is just asking to get slammed for putting your foot in your mouth, like you just did.

Not a big deal really, you'll learn from it, but mainly it's just not helpful to somebody looking to solve an issue and getting advice that is not based in reality.
Yeah that's what I learned, that I had installed the RAM improperly. I built my computer a long time ago and installed the RAM improperly. Only when I upgraded did I notice that problem. Didn't mean to give bad advice, only what worked for me. I think you may have misread what I wrote though. My computer operated better when it was installed properly, not the way I had originally. Perhaps I could've worded it better.
 
Dec 24, 2019
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Yeah that's what I learned, that I had installed the RAM improperly. I built my computer a long time ago and installed the RAM improperly. Only when I upgraded did I notice that problem. Didn't mean to give bad advice, only what worked for me. I think you may have misread what I wrote though. My computer operated better when it was installed properly, not the way I had originally. Perhaps I could've worded it better.
Thanks you guys for all your advice. Buddy is gonna look at my PC today, I’ll recommend these options to him and see if one of them fixes my issue and I’ll report back. Thank you guys for the help!!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yeah that's what I learned, that I had installed the RAM improperly. I built my computer a long time ago and installed the RAM improperly. Only when I upgraded did I notice that problem. Didn't mean to give bad advice, only what worked for me. I think you may have misread what I wrote though. My computer operated better when it was installed properly, not the way I had originally. Perhaps I could've worded it better.

I see what you mean. Yes, I agree, it was the wording. I take back my spanking. LOL.
 
Oct 17, 2019
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Hmm, my brother keeps telling me it’s a RAM issue but it could be a CPU issue as well. I’m new to PC and don’t really understand how all this works so I had a friend of mine build the PC for me and if there’s a problem I get him to look at it. I tried to reseat the RAM myself cause, how hard could it be, right? I did this and no display pops up although, before I touched the RAM the PC would still boot up even though it was only reading one stick of RAM. My CPU fan comes on as does the graphics card and my other fans along with the light on the motherboard so all of this has to be fine, right? Although I don’t think it’s a CPU issue, I’ll still definitely have my buddy use this method and check to make sure everything is fine. Thank you for your help!
Are you sure that your ram is pushed in all the way? And by all the way, i mean not only the top notches have to click, but the BOTTOM notches also need to click in. Try giving the bottom side of the ram a little bit of force ''dont be scared to push hard'' You will know if you are using too much force. I had a similar issue, and my problem was that even though the top notches clicked in, i hadn't pushed in the bottom hard enough.
 
Dec 24, 2019
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I have a relatively new build, it worked fine up until today. I have an AMD Ryzen 5 2600 processor with an ASUS B450 Prime AMD Ryzen 2 motherboard, Crucial Ballistix sport LT 2666 MHz DDR4 RAM, and an MSI Radeon RX 580 graphics card. I was having a problem with my RAM (it was only detecting 4GB instead of all 8) so I powered off my PC and unplugged it and reseated my RAM. After doing so, I went to turn my PC back on but am not getting a display on my monitor. Everything turns on, graphics card, processor, fans, and I even get the lights on my motherboard, but nothing comes up on the screen. And also, my mouse and WiFi adapter are plugged into my motherboard but neither are coming on. It’s like the motherboard isn’t reading that they are plugged in. Can someone please, please help me. I payed almost $1000 and waited over a month for all of my parts and only got about 4-5 days of playtime. I want to avoid having to buy new parts but if it comes down to it then I guess I’ll have to. Can anyone please help me with this???
!!UPDATE!! It was indeed a RAM issue. It turns out BOTH sticks do indeed work and they were not installed correctly. Thank you all for your time and suggestions. I really appreciate it. Merry Christmas everyone!!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I kind of figured as much, which is why I said this.

Reinstall the memory making SURE to align the notch in the slot with the relief in the memory module itself, and FULLY seat the memory until the lock at one end (Or both ends for models with locks at both ends of the DIMM slot) click into place into the cutout in the end of the DIMM.
and this:


I tried to reseat the RAM myself cause, how hard could it be, right?
🤣

You might be surprised how difficult, or tricky, the simplest seeming things can be. Take nothing for granted and when in doubt, double or triple check and be sure to ask questions anytime you are not 100% sure about what you OR somebody else, is doing.

Glad you got it sorted out, Merry Christmas to you as well.
 
Dec 23, 2019
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pc novice here. before you drag your cpu out ect you might want to just pull your gpu and run from onboard, pull all usbs apart from keyboard. unplug all sata devices apart from main boot drive. try that first. i bought new ram once and this was all it took. booted normally and it worked. im not saying this will work but id rather rule this out before dismantling everything.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
pc novice here. before you drag your cpu out ect you might want to just pull your gpu and run from onboard, pull all usbs apart from keyboard. unplug all sata devices apart from main boot drive. try that first. i bought new ram once and this was all it took. booted normally and it worked. im not saying this will work but id rather rule this out before dismantling everything.

Seems you might be a forum novice too, since you didn't bother to read the whole thread and see that he already solved the problem. :sneaky:
 

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