Question Need Help Building PC with old parts

Astro RAM

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So I have some spare parts that are still it pretty good condition. I decided not to sell them and re-use them to build a system to give to my little sister who wants a PC but parents this year can't spend money on a brand new one. Hence why I offered if possible to build a PC from old parts I had lying around. She's not a heavy gamer but likes indie titles and mainly The Sims. I just wanna make sure that:

A) This PC will do fine and handle Windows 10
B) A good decently low priced case can I get that wont be terrible for her (parents offered to buy this piece and they are on a budget)
C)Good PSU to put in there
D) What decent cooler can I put in there


So far with what the current part list is(All parts have been in the same system so I know they work together):
CPU: AMD FX 8320
Mobo: Asus M5A97 R2.0
RAM: 16GBs (DDR3 1333)
Gpu: Gigabyte Gtx 770 windforce (2gbs)
Ssd: Samsung 500GB
Hdd: 1tb WD Blue (may get ditched but unsure)


If anyone thinks this wont be a good system at all, I am open to ideas but sadly it be post Christmas to make and I wouldn't want to do that if possible. Plus I wont be able to replace the GPU as how the market is right now.
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
The key is the motherboard: Asus M5A97 R2.0

Go to the Asus website and find the applicable motherboard User Guide/Manual.

Ensure that the motherboard does indeed support all of the other components that you listed. You should also check the appropriate QVL (Qualified Vendors List) to double check supported components and their specs.

Ensure that the RAM is a matched set (2 x 8 GB) for dual channel use.

Look for the applicable User Guides/Manuals for all of those components as well.

Read the motherboard's User Guide/Manual and plan the build step by step with regards to physical installation and configuration thereafter.

Regarding the PSU. The PSU is a critical component and must be capable of providing the necessary wattage at times of peak system demand.

FYI:

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-psus,4229.html

Key is to read all of the documentation, pay attention to fine print/details, and plan everything out in advance,
 

punkncat

Champion
Ambassador
Power supply pricing is artificially inflated right now due to Christmas. I would expect pricing to correct shortly after Christmas. I typically use this site to get a good idea of what to use:

Power Supply Calculator - PSU Calculator | OuterVision

As far as cases are concerned one of my favorite go to is Rosewill for inexpensive cases that don't look and feel cheap. I have used DIY PC and have seen disposable turkey pans be more rigid.

Your motherboard is full ATX, you will need a case of that type for it to work. The motherboard does use DDR3 1333, so that part is good. Says AM3+, so you will want to confirm on the CPU.

The system should be fine for W10.
 

Astro RAM

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May 15, 2014
193
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18,680
The key is the motherboard: Asus M5A97 R2.0

Go to the Asus website and find the applicable motherboard User Guide/Manual.

Ensure that the motherboard does indeed support all of the other components that you listed. You should also check the appropriate QVL (Qualified Vendors List) to double check supported components and their specs.

Ensure that the RAM is a matched set (2 x 8 GB) for dual channel use.

Look for the applicable User Guides/Manuals for all of those components as well.

Read the motherboard's User Guide/Manual and plan the build step by step with regards to physical installation and configuration thereafter.

Regarding the PSU. The PSU is a critical component and must be capable of providing the necessary wattage at times of peak system demand.

FYI:

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-psus,4229.html

Key is to read all of the documentation, pay attention to fine print/details, and plan everything out in advance,
I apologise for not saying so above. But I know all these parts work together, as they were all in the same system and I had replaced them and only had kept the PSU and case for the new build. When I state "Will the PC do fine" I meant in a sense will it handle the games she's interesting in playing at moderate settings. Sorry for not being that clear. I should edit that into the main question.
 

Astro RAM

Distinguished
May 15, 2014
193
0
18,680
Power supply pricing is artificially inflated right now due to Christmas. I would expect pricing to correct shortly after Christmas. I typically use this site to get a good idea of what to use:

Power Supply Calculator - PSU Calculator | OuterVision

As far as cases are concerned one of my favorite go to is Rosewill for inexpensive cases that don't look and feel cheap. I have used DIY PC and have seen disposable turkey pans be more rigid.

Your motherboard is full ATX, you will need a case of that type for it to work. The motherboard does use DDR3 1333, so that part is good. Says AM3+, so you will want to confirm on the CPU.

The system should be fine for W10.
Which Rosewell case are you referring to?
 

punkncat

Champion
Ambassador
Which Rosewell case are you referring to?

What I typically do is go to Newegg and enter search parameters for the size case I want and then sort them by lowest price. Then, I move through the pricing I like alongside not looking like a space ship....often, that ends up being Rosewill. You may find others. Recently picked up a Thermaltake that was a traditional office style case and fit the use case.
Anyway, once I find one there (or if you are familiar with another site that has good filters) I typically go look on Amazon, eBay and such to see how competitive the pricing is.

TL;DR- I don't have a specific model
 
You will need a power supply.
Do not go cheap here.
You need about a 650w psu.
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
It is hard to tell quality, but if the psu has a 7 year warranty it is likely to be of good quality.
For example this Seasonic focus gm-650:
https://www.newegg.com/seasonic-foc...6817151202?Item=9SIAD6HBKT4864&quicklink=true

You can use windows 10 for 30 days without a license.
After a small watermark will appear on the monitor, but you get used to it.

On cases, you really can run without one if you spread the parts out on a table.
Or an open case like this for $28:
https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-0319-00066?Item=9SIBFGVJ705317&quicklink=true
I think the fractal design focus G cases are decent, they come in a variety of colors:
https://www.newegg.com/mystic-red-f...-tower/p/N82E16811352074?Item=N82E16811352074
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
"will it handle the games she's interesting in playing at moderate settings. Sorry for not being that clear. I should edit that into the main question. "

No problem.

Most games provide some listing of the required hardware specs in the form of "minimal", "recommended", or" "best".

You do not want minimal and you do want as much best as you can afford or othewise install into the build.

Visit the game manufacturer's websites to find the listed hardware/software specs necessary for the game.

Check the game's Forums and FAQs. Other players may have posted relevant questions and performance related information.

Look for what is said as well as what is not said. What questions, for example, go unanswered?
 

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