Question Need help finding reliable GPU repair centre ?

VillaDan

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So this is the second place I am asking for help looked all over but I don't trust myself to find the right place for the job I have two gtx titans a basic model (p/n 06G-P4-2791-KR) and the second is a black edition (p/n gtx Titan 699120830031710 H ) and the first place I asked is here https://linustechtips.com/topic/1379603-need-help-finding-someone-who-can-repair-graphics-cards/ but the only answer I got was northridgefix who no longer fix graphics cards so my question is this does anyone who a trust worthy repair shop I can ship them to
with that the issues with them ( I have tried in other systems and pcie slots different psu same issues with them)

basic model titan has a blown resister and i think thats all not sure as I don't do sauntering https://linustechtips.com/uploads/monthly_2021_10/IMG_20210911_203643__01.jpg.a74078a44dcc4c0c8d2906262297cdf2.jpg

black edition is starting to artifact on the screen when in use does boot but windows no longer recognize it
https://linustechtips.com/uploads/monthly_2021_10/Screenshot_20211008-182322.jpg.746437ad589a9ca5961b7e52cbcc1588.jpg
sorry for photo image but can see the artifacting I am talking about in top right of screen I have tried all other connectors same issue
 

TommyTwoTone66

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There’s no such thing as a GPU repair centre.
Graphics cards are not meant to be repaired, they are designed to be replaced.
Any shop dumb enough to offer GPU repair as a service quickly stops doing so when they find out GPUs cannot be repaired 99% of the time.
 

Eximo

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There’s no such thing as a GPU repair centre.
Graphics cards are not meant to be repaired, they are designed to be replaced.
Any shop dumb enough to offer GPU repair as a service quickly stops doing so when they find out GPUs cannot be repaired 99% of the time.
I wouldn't say no such thing, just not many and they likely aren't taking customers.

Sometimes devices are too expensive to toss, those people that can repair them will take on multi-thousand dollar jobs regularly. Certain high end GPUs may be profitable to repair right now, but it is doubtful. You take a guy who is used to getting 200/hour, it had better be a quick fix.
 

Eximo

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A single bad resistor isn't too bad actually. Probably not worth the money to have a professional fix it, but if you know anyone with a soldering iron, this might be the time to buy them a pizza.

If it really is that single component, I would say you could get this one fixed.

I should add we had someone here the other day who replaced a capacitor successfully. I'll see if I can find it.
 

punkncat

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I was going to suggest Northridge as I wasn't aware they weren't taking them any longer. That guy is a wizard, but likely got tired of having the hassle when they couldn't be repaired.

Have you contacted the manufacturer to see if they offer any repair or suggest a location?

The one that is artifacting, I would suggest trying to take it down, clean it, give it new paste and pads. Try it again and if it still acts up, try to undervolt/clock it.
 

TommyTwoTone66

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I wouldn't say no such thing, just not many and they likely aren't taking customers.

Sometimes devices are too expensive to toss, those people that can repair them will take on multi-thousand dollar jobs regularly. Certain high end GPUs may be profitable to repair right now, but it is doubtful. You take a guy who is used to getting 200/hour, it had better be a quick fix.
I would love to meet the person that can reliably replace a surface mounted resistor on a GPU. They would need amazingly steady hands, maybe a robotic soldiering arm?

If it was possible you could make $1000-$2000 a day repairing broken cards And flipping them on eBay. Im sure anyone with those skills doesn’t want to waste their time for $50 an hour repairing someone else’s card.
 

VillaDan

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I was going to suggest Northridge as I wasn't aware they weren't taking them any longer. That guy is a wizard, but likely got tired of having the hassle when they couldn't be repaired.

Have you contacted the manufacturer to see if they offer any repair or suggest a location?

The one that is artifacting, I would suggest trying to take it down, clean it, give it new paste and pads. Try it again and if it still acts up, try to undervolt/clock it.
I didn't even think of asking the manufacturer do to their age
 

InvalidError

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I would love to meet the person that can reliably replace a surface mounted resistor on a GPU. They would need amazingly steady hands, maybe a robotic soldiering arm?
The busted resistor on the first GPU is a relatively chunky current shunt, doesn't take that much skill to pluck and replace anything 0805 and larger like those.

With my $80 hot-air wand, I'm relatively comfortable reworking components down to 0603 size by hand and can manage 0402s with mild cursing if I have to.

The most skilled person I've seen work on PCBs was an RF guy working with 10-15GHz RF stuff for his master's thesis in EE and he was hand-soldering 0201s. You can barely see those with the naked eye and can be difficult to pick up with tweezers. When I accidentally pluck one of those off of a board while changing something else nearby, I don't even try putting them back.
 

boju

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Is it the upper 5ohm resistor in pic?

This guy modded his XP. Could probably use same 1R5 resistor. Doesn't look all that hard to solder, no pins to worry about just solder each side down flat on pcb.


https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Panasonic/ERJ-M1WSF5M0U?qs=sGAEpiMZZMtlleCFQhR/zWEAYIYjGcyDOAOWVexWG0k=
 

boju

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The M in 5M0 stands for the mili (x0.001) SI suffix so the value is 0.0050 ohm.

Makes sense in a current-sensing application where the current-sensing resistor may be seeing 10-15A: P = R *I^2 - 0.5W to 1.125W per resistor under load.
I see. You are the magician here :)

If that is the only thing needs replacing, one 1R5 could do the job? Wouldn't have to replace them all?
 
I might have those shunts on the shelf. Looks like 2512 (6.3mm by 3.1mm but I might be wrong). Will replace one for a beer if you pay the shipping to/from Canada and pack it properly. No diagnostics, just replace and return. Short it with a steel tweezer to test - if it posts the shunt is the problem.
For the other one and GPU repair in general, diagnostics is the most expensive part. In most cases, you spend at least an hour and then - part order and repair... The time consumed in some cases outweighs the GPU costs hence none wants to deal with it. You can spend similar time on repairing an automotive or airplane module instead which would be a more rewarding and often easier job.
 
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Karadjgne

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Generally the only components worth fixing by solder are motherboards, and thats generally no harder than pulling out the caps and replacing. Assembly line type process can re-cap multiple boards in an hour. But thats not diagnosis. You'd have to know the exact resistor, shunt or otherwise, to replace. Afayk it could be nothing more than the fuse needs replacing on the dead card.

Der8auer can do it, as can multiple others, seen the vids on YouTube, and in today's gpu market a titan class card might be worth it to repair, but maybe not.

Could also try colleges offering electronics engineering as a last ditch effort.
 

InvalidError

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If that is the only thing needs replacing, one 1R5 could do the job? Wouldn't have to replace them all?
The shunt is 5M0 (0.005 ohm), not 1R5 (1.5 ohm) so 1R5 wouldn't work at all. 1R5 would cause the card to trip an over-current throttling at 1/300th its intended current limit. Such an extreme "reverse shunt mod" would make it one of the lowest-power Titan in existence if the card can run on that little power :)
 

VillaDan

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Is it the upper 5ohm resistor in pic?

This guy modded his XP. Could probably use same 1R5 resistor. Doesn't look all that hard to solder, no pins to worry about just solder each side down flat on pcb.


https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Panasonic/ERJ-M1WSF5M0U?qs=sGAEpiMZZMtlleCFQhR/zWEAYIYjGcyDOAOWVexWG0k=
Yes it's the upper 5ohm resister as far as I can see that's the only thing that I can find that is in bad shape if the link is actually capable of working then I'll order it and get it solder my question is would any kind of solder work or is their anything specific needed for soldering or can I just use a regular solder to do that
 
Yes it's the upper 5ohm resister as far as I can see that's the only thing that I can find that is in bad shape if the link is actually capable of working then I'll order it and get it solder my question is would any kind of solder work or is their anything specific needed for soldering or can I just use a regular solder to do that
You could use an air gun, soldering iron is ok to mount but you need to take it off and clean the pads first.
It is not 5 Ohm, it is 5 milliohm. Any of these should fit if the size is right (take a caliper and measure the size if you want to be exact).
I would recommend experimenting on SMD soldering with less expensive stuff first, repair after repair is more expensive with anything...
 
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VillaDan

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You could use an air gun, soldering iron is ok to mount but you need to take it off and clean the pads first.
It is not 5 Ohm, it is 0.5 milliohm. Any of these should fit if the size is right (take a caliper and measure the size if you want to be exact).
I would recommend experimenting on SMD soldering with less expensive stuff first, repair after repair is more expensive with anything...
So is their a chemical for this or would rubbing alcohol work to clean the pads
 
5M0 is 5.0 milli-ohms.
correct

If you put a 0.5 milli-ohms resistor in there, the PWM controller will shut down because the current sense value is too far out of bounds and will get flagged as a fault.
Any bases for this? Or just an un-based guess? I would just use a steel wire to test if the card would boot first and nothing would shut down...
All the current steering and load control stuff becomes effective when there is (considerable) load. Powerup sequence is what you are after at the moment.
 
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InvalidError

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Any bases for this? Or just an un-based guess? I would just use a steel wire to test if the card would boot first and nothing would shut down...
Depends on the VRM chip. Since these are early Titans, you are probably correct that they do not actually care about the shunt resistor value and you can just throw a piece of suitable size wire in there. Won't work with something newer like an RTX2000 where the VRM does sanity check input power against output power. Those can only be shunt-modded by up to about +50% before the VRM locks out.
 
There are many ways to trick and mod it. I'm a fan of making things right which would be a non-modded but properly fixed card. For checking only I would short the shunt to see if the card boots before going through the repair hassle (which is an easy job too).
 

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