Question Need help getting GT 1650 to work on older computer

May 22, 2020
52
0
30
0
Hi all,

Some kind memebers helped me pick out a 1650 in this thread: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/best-cost-to-value-video-card-upgrades-for-this-older-mb.3629964/#post-21878512

Summary: Older computer I'm looking to upgrade.

My computer/ motherboard:​
Computer: HP Pavilion HPE h8-1120
Motherboard:​
IPISB-CU (Carmel2)
Manufacturer: Pegatron​
BaseBoard: 2AC2​
version 2.00​
My current video card:​
AMD Radeon HD 6570​
PCI Express 2.0 x16​

I've installed the 1650 on the HP - it beeps once at the HP startup page (the one that shows "hit ESC to enter startup mode") then beeps a few more times. I can't get past here. The keyboard and mouse don't seem to work.

I've looked around the forum and see mention of UEFI, bios updates, uninstalling old drivers first, etc... but I'm a bit lost and don't want to start randomly doing things without some guidance. That and the fact that I have not idea what the issue really is, what UEFI is and if it's relevant here, how to look for a bios update or update it. :)

I appreciate the help.
 
May 22, 2020
52
0
30
0
Quick update: I used DDU to uninstall the AMD drivers from my old card, shut down, inserted the new 1650 and restart. DAMN - still get the single beep then 4 more on the HP screen and it never moves past that.

Any suggestions?
 
May 22, 2020
52
0
30
0
I looked into a bios update - it currently has a bios from July 2011. The last bios update Feb 2012. I can't imagine that 7 months would make a difference for the 1650 video card installation given it's 2020.

Could I be wrong?

After reading even more, I'm wondering if there's some setting in the bios or some other setting dealing with UEFI or something else that might help?

I had the machine open when I tried to boot and the fan on the 1650 was spinning (not sure if that means much but....)

Thx
 
May 22, 2020
52
0
30
0
Start in safe mode (F8) and remove the old GPU drivers ( A System Restore Point first is not a bad idea).
Then do a clean install of the new GPU drivers.
In the BIOS you may need to turn off Secure Boot, and enable Legacy Compatability Mode. At least that's how Dell does it.
Hi - thank you. I appreciate it.

Question. During my tests I have been booting into safe mode and removing the old drivers.

When you say do a clean install of the new GPU drivers, are you suggesting I do that before I install the new GPU? I can't boot with the new GPU installed, which is why I'm asking.

Also, do all BIOS have a Legacy Compatibility Mode? I haven't seen that.
 
Any GPU can run in Safe Mode with no drivers installed. So yes. Install the GPU and boot Safe Mode and install the new drivers.s ome drivers will require Windows running to install, but will run the Safe Mode video settings until they do install.
 
The bios probably doesn't recognize the GPU. I just read of people having issues getting a GTX 1060 to work on the same motherboard and there was no bios update that would work with the card. Some GTX 1060 models will work in older systems, like my EVGA GTX 1060 6 GB single fan model (06G-P4-6161-RX.) That card worked without issue on an MSI P6N Diamond SLI nForce 680i motherboard from 2007.
 
Reactions: Lands
May 22, 2020
52
0
30
0
Any GPU can run in Safe Mode with no drivers installed. So yes. Install the GPU and boot Safe Mode and install the new drivers.s ome drivers will require Windows running to install, but will run the Safe Mode video settings until they do install.
OK, thanks. I will try this.


The bios probably doesn't recognize the GPU. I just read of people having issues getting a GTX 1060 to work on the same motherboard and there was no bios update that would work with the card. Some GTX 1060 models will work in older systems, like my EVGA GTX 1060 6 GB single fan model (06G-P4-6161-RX.) That card worked without issue on an MSI P6N Diamond SLI nForce 680i motherboard from 2007.
Appreciate that info. That's what I'm afraid of. If there are issues with the 1060 it makes sense that the 1650 might have those same problems.

I might look into an older card but the trick there is often they're not so cheap and I need to make sure I'm getting enough of an improvement over the old card (not usually hard to do but the 1650 was something like 800+% better and man was I looking forward to trying it out)

Since I have an AMD card in there now I'm wondering if I should try an AMD (I was going with Intel because I do a lot of Adobe work.
 
May 22, 2020
52
0
30
0
This page can be of help. Scroll down to the "Legacy GPU Hierarchy" section. You can find the HD 6570 in that section, then scroll upward to see what is of higher tiers than your existing card.
This looks great!

I found the 6570. My question is how much higher into the tiers above can I go? Do you think because they're in the "Legacy GPU" section that they all should work? Just wondering the how and why so I can start my research.

Appreciate it
 
This looks great!

I found the 6570. My question is how much higher into the tiers above can I go? Do you think because they're in the "Legacy GPU" section that they all should work? Just wondering the how and why so I can start my research.

Appreciate it
Your case should be able to mount a Micro ATX motherboard if you decide to buy a used motherboard to keep using your i7-2600 instead of getting a downgrade GPU for probably the same price.

I would look for a replacement motherboard with maybe a Z68 or Z77 chipset.
 
Reactions: Lands
I found the 6570. My question is how much higher into the tiers above can I go? Do you think because they're in the "Legacy GPU" section that they all should work? Just wondering the how and why so I can start my research.
[/QUOTE]

The Legacy section just means they aren't considered current models. It has nothing to do with UEFI/Legacy BIOS issues. Many came both ways.
With Dells I can usually find thousands of each computer and see what GPUs are being used. I'm finding nothing on that MB.
Theoretically the GPU slot should be 16x PCIe compatable. Sometimes there will be a stencil by the slot saying 35W limit or some other value. Dell users ignore that routinely ( at their own risk). UEFI cards need UEFI systems but that one should be UEFI. Legacy cards can run in anything with some settings.
I'm running an MSI GTX1060 3GB in an Optiplex 380, and a GTX1060 6GB in an XPS420 which is LGA775 DDR2 era.
it can be tough to remove AMD drivers. I think I've had to use a special utility to do it before. Be sure and set a System Restore to get them back if it doesn't work.
https://www.amd.com/en/support/kb/faq/gpu-601
If you have an extra hard drive try a clean OS install with that GPU in there. Something ought to work.
 
Reactions: Lands

King_V

Distinguished
This looks great!

I found the 6570. My question is how much higher into the tiers above can I go? Do you think because they're in the "Legacy GPU" section that they all should work? Just wondering the how and why so I can start my research.

Appreciate it
Well, you should go up three tiers or more to see a noticeable improvement. Each tier is indicated by where you see the "Nvidia GeForce" and "AMD Radeon" row again.

I know with some of the older Dell computers (including one I have now, and XPS 8300, Sandy Bridge era Intel chips), up to the 10- series Nvidia worked, but the AMD RX and some of the R9 cards did not work (unless the board partner added a UEFI/Legacy BIOS switch to the GPU). A newer model that works with those (Dell XPS 8700, Haswell era Intel chips) supposedly has issues with the 16- series Nvidia cards.

I would assume at the very least that Nvidia 900 series cards, and AMD cards from before they went with R5/R7/R9/RX should work. It would probably be a good idea to search your particular HP model on some of the HP forums to see if you can find people who have done a card upgrade on the same machine successfully.
 
Reactions: Lands
May 22, 2020
52
0
30
0
Your case should be able to mount a Micro ATX motherboard if you decide to buy a used motherboard to keep using your i7-2600 instead of getting a downgrade GPU for probably the same price.

I would look for a replacement motherboard with maybe a Z68 or Z77 chipset.
That's good to know, although I don't think I have the will to try and replace the MB. I'm 2 for 4 at this point. I got the new RAM and SSD to work. Not so much on the GPU and the USB 3.0 card.

The Legacy section just means they aren't considered current models. It has nothing to do with UEFI/Legacy BIOS issues. Many came both ways.
With Dells I can usually find thousands of each computer and see what GPUs are being used. I'm finding nothing on that MB.
Theoretically the GPU slot should be 16x PCIe compatable. Sometimes there will be a stencil by the slot saying 35W limit or some other value. Dell users ignore that routinely ( at their own risk). UEFI cards need UEFI systems but that one should be UEFI. Legacy cards can run in anything with some settings.
I'm running an MSI GTX1060 3GB in an Optiplex 380, and a GTX1060 6GB in an XPS420 which is LGA775 DDR2 era.
it can be tough to remove AMD drivers. I think I've had to use a special utility to do it before. Be sure and set a System Restore to get them back if it doesn't work.
https://www.amd.com/en/support/kb/faq/gpu-601
If you have an extra hard drive try a clean OS install with that GPU in there. Something ought to work.
OK, thanks. That should help try and narrow it down. I did use that utility in save mode to remove the AMD drivers and I'm pretty sure it worked as when I booted back up with the old card they had to reinstall.

I'm tempted to try an older AMD card but their older cards. In this environment, I hate to have to return stuff. It's a big pain.


Well, you should go up three tiers or more to see a noticeable improvement. Each tier is indicated by where you see the "Nvidia GeForce" and "AMD Radeon" row again.

I know with some of the older Dell computers (including one I have now, and XPS 8300, Sandy Bridge era Intel chips), up to the 10- series Nvidia worked, but the AMD RX and some of the R9 cards did not work (unless the board partner added a UEFI/Legacy BIOS switch to the GPU). A newer model that works with those (Dell XPS 8700, Haswell era Intel chips) supposedly has issues with the 16- series Nvidia cards.

I would assume at the very least that Nvidia 900 series cards, and AMD cards from before they went with R5/R7/R9/RX should work. It would probably be a good idea to search your particular HP model on some of the HP forums to see if you can find people who have done a card upgrade on the same machine successfully.
Great, thanks for the detailed info. An AMD before that series might be worth a look. The consideration is that my current card isn't terrible, so if you go back too far the improvement isn't that appreciable.

I found this link. Unsure how accurate it is, and I'm sure they stopped adding to the list at some point. Maybe there's something on there that makes sense:

https://www.pc-specs.com/mobo/Pegatron_Corporation/Pegatron_2AC2/2965/Compatible_GPUs

(edit: most of the AMD cards I'm looking at on the list don't even have HDMI connections)
 
May 22, 2020
52
0
30
0
I took a spin around the HP forums and I MIGHT have found some info that is useful. I've seen statements like this made in regards to my motherboard the a GPU:

Newer video cards, such as the GTX 1050 Ti require UEFI in the motherboard instead of a standard/Legacy BIOS. HP didn't begin using UEFI until mid October, 2012. Your computer was released in September, 2011.
The RX 570 was released for sale in April, 2017 and it requires a system board UEFI BIOS.

... does not have a UEFI BIOS and cannot be updated to a UEFI BIOS.

Sapphire (Link) has some AMD series (X) graphics cards that can toggle between a Legacy or UEFI BIOS.
  1. Does this make sense?
  2. If so, how can I easily confirm that a GPU I'm considering will work? (will it literally say that it doesn't require UEFI?)
 
Many people say that new GPUs all require UEFI and it's not true.
As far as when HP went to UEFI that is probably correct. Dell was on the UEFI committee so they may have gotten on board sooner. Dell doesn't have a list or a date for going to UEFI. You have to ask about each system and they can tell you.
The Opti 380 was Legacy, the same era Opti 780 was UEFI.
Not all cards of the same GPU chip have the same BIOS requirements. Even back in the GTX750 days, MSI was UEFI, and PNY was legacy. Now I'm running a much newer MSI GTX 1060 3GB in a Legacy Optiplex 380. Also an MSI GTX1060 6GB in a definitely Legacy XPS 720. I'm also seeing GTX2060 in the same era Dell Precision T3400 workstation. Those are both LGA775 DDR2 machines. I'm also seeing RX480 ,a nd RX580 running in the t3400 . So it can't be true for AMD.
https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/29251781
https://www.userbenchmark.com/System/Dell-Precision-WorkStation-T3400/3505
Nvidia doesn't need it unless the card Mfg. decided to do that..
AMD drivers can keep a new card form running. I had to use the special utility to get them out to install my GTX750.
Unfortunately the vendors are useless. You have to go to the MFG. of the specific card to find out.
Zotac seems to be Legacy, and PNY also. MSI seems to be OK now.
The problem with compatability lists is they don't get updated. I routinely run CPUs, and GPUs and RAM setups that Dell never certified. Dell will tell you my Opti 380 is a 65W 2 core 4GB machine. It now has a 120W Xeon X5470, 8GB RAM, and a GTX1060 3GB they never imagined running in that.
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY