[SOLVED] Need help installing Cooler Master MF200R fan on the top of a Cooler Master H500 case

ProtoflareX

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Jan 3, 2014
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I'm unable to post pictures, unfortunately, but hopefully somebody can help me. I'm trying to install a Cooler Master MF200R fan in the top fan slot of a Cooler Master H500 case. Included within the MF200R's box was one small bag of tiny screws and one small bag of longer screws. The screw holes align perfectly with the case holes, so there's no issue with that, but it feels like I'm missing a part. The tiny screws require a great amount of force to screw in, to the point where it feels unsafe and as if I'm going to disfigure the screw hole. As for the longer screws... they simply don't do anything. They can be inserted into the screw holes with no issue, but attempting to screw them in does nothing as they are not screwing /tightening into anything. I realize offering assistance without any pictures will be difficult, but is there any form of advice that can be offered to me here?
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
There's 2 ways to mount a fan. Up or down.
The fan mounting holes are pristine, nice and smooth, on purpose, because of the multite of different mounting systems possible.

What you have is fine. Those short, course thread screws are self tapping, self threading screws. Yes, they are tight, they are made to cut into the sides of the plastic holes and create threaded grooves. I call this down.

The fan you hold underneath the top of the case, the screws go in from outside, on top. Tip: take a screw and put it into every hole, tightening it almost all the way down (then back out), before attempting to mount the fan. This pre-creates the threads for you, making mounting far easier.

The long screws are for up. They are for going through the fan holes, front and back, and attaching to a radiator or case.

Down sandwiches the case between the screw and fan, up sandwiches the fan between screw and case/rad.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
How to post pictures here. And anybody can post pictures, you just can't upload them here. You must upload them elsewhere and THEN link to them here. AND, they MUST end in an IMAGE format, like .jpg, .png. , .bmp, etc. The link cannot end in a regular page URL.

 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I would recommend that you get some of these instead. Yes, it's a small expense, but they work better anyhow and you eliminate the problem of the screws not working which might not be compatible with your case or fan combination.

https://www.amazon.com/Cosmos-Pieces-Rubber-Mounting-Screws/dp/B00H9905KA

There are many brands, number of screws per kit, etc., available. They don't have to be THAT specific part I linked to. Available globally pretty much.

I like these.

https://www.amazon.com/Noctua-NA-SAV2-Chromax-Anti-Vibration-Mount/dp/B018T3826S


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ubpvd_ZTPs
 
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Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
There's 2 ways to mount a fan. Up or down.
The fan mounting holes are pristine, nice and smooth, on purpose, because of the multite of different mounting systems possible.

What you have is fine. Those short, course thread screws are self tapping, self threading screws. Yes, they are tight, they are made to cut into the sides of the plastic holes and create threaded grooves. I call this down.

The fan you hold underneath the top of the case, the screws go in from outside, on top. Tip: take a screw and put it into every hole, tightening it almost all the way down (then back out), before attempting to mount the fan. This pre-creates the threads for you, making mounting far easier.

The long screws are for up. They are for going through the fan holes, front and back, and attaching to a radiator or case.

Down sandwiches the case between the screw and fan, up sandwiches the fan between screw and case/rad.
 
Reactions: ProtoflareX

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Eh, still doesn't sound right. I've used those self tapping fan screws plenty often in the past, and it never felt like I was about to strip or ruin anything. They've always gone in fairly easy, even factoring in the need to allow them to tap the plastic. But maybe I'm just more accustomed to the feel than a first timer. Certainly possible.

I'm just thinking that if they're in doubt, or can't get it to work, then the rubber screws are definitely an option AND they absolutely tend to eliminate much of the transferred vibration created with a fan to case contact using normal fasteners.
 

ProtoflareX

Honorable
Jan 3, 2014
263
2
10,785
0
There's 2 ways to mount a fan. Up or down.
The fan mounting holes are pristine, nice and smooth, on purpose, because of the multite of different mounting systems possible.

What you have is fine. Those short, course thread screws are self tapping, self threading screws. Yes, they are tight, they are made to cut into the sides of the plastic holes and create threaded grooves. I call this down.

The fan you hold underneath the top of the case, the screws go in from outside, on top. Tip: take a screw and put it into every hole, tightening it almost all the way down (then back out), before attempting to mount the fan. This pre-creates the threads for you, making mounting far easier.

The long screws are for up. They are for going through the fan holes, front and back, and attaching to a radiator or case.

Down sandwiches the case between the screw and fan, up sandwiches the fan between screw and case/rad.
Wow, is that true? I never would have guessed that the screws are meant to created threaded grooves that weren't there previously. It literally felt like I was going to break the fan when I tried to screw those in. Guess it was my own trepidation that led me to not discovering that on my own.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Totally true. Look at any fan when it is new/pristine, and you'll see that there are no threads for the fasteners.

They are coarse threaded fasteners for a reason, so as to reduce the probability of stripping out the hole like a fine thread would tend to do, especially in a relatively soft material like that.
 
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ProtoflareX

Honorable
Jan 3, 2014
263
2
10,785
0
Totally true. Look at any fan when it is new/pristine, and you'll see that there are no threads for the fasteners.

They are coarse threaded fasteners for a reason, so as to reduce the probability of stripping out the hole like a fine thread would tend to do, especially in a relatively soft material like that.
This will be great knowledge to have in the future. Thank you to both you and Karadjgne for taking the time to answer my questions.
 

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