Question need help to find a pwm fan hub

Apr 24, 2019
13
2
15
0
hi guys,i have 7 4pin pwm fans and my md is asus rog strix b360-f that has only five 4pin fan headers (minus 1 for cpu).need a guide on buying a fan hub.i was thinking about deepcool FH-10
can FH-10 control all my fans or it can control one of them and the orhers will go full speed?
 
Last edited:
Apr 24, 2019
13
2
15
0
That's a lot of fans. As you already have 5 headers I'd just get two 4 pin splitter cables. A fan headers can easily handler dual fans.
yes it :sweatsmile:,needed some aesthetics and to give cool air to my gtx 1080 and core i7 8700
i cant find any 4 pin splitter cable,all of them are one cable 4 pin and other one cable 3 pin(sorry for bad grammar)
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
A fan hub uses 1 header as control, so all fans run at same speed, 2 fans or 10 fans. If your fans are different, in different areas this isn't always good. You'll want control of different areas, so 3 fans at intake are seperate from 2 top fans, seperate from rear exhaust.


That's a 3way pwm splitter. It'll use 1 header to control 3 fans, with just 1 fan as a lead fan. So if you have 3 fans at front intake, this keeps control of all 3 like a single fan unit. There's also 2way and 4way (has seperate power source) so you can mix and match according to plan, needs and control.
In that picture above, only 1 fan connector is 4pin, the other are 3pin. This is done on purpose, as there is only 1 header connection. So only 1 fan needs to report its speed. The header controls every fan according to the 1 fan speed, so all 3 fans operate the same.
 
Your worry about the Splitters you have seen is not a worry. Background: any mobo fan header can deal with the speed signal (2 pulses per revolution) sent back to it from a fan on Pin #3, but ONLY from ONE fan. It cannot work with two or more pulse streams coming in. So all proper Splitters AND Hubs will send back to the mobo host header only ONE fan's speed signal, and ignore all the others. You will never "see" the "other" speeds, but this has NO impact on ability to control the speeds. The very simplest way to do this is that a Splitter such as you have seen simply will have Pin #3 in only ONE of its output connectors, and will have no Pin #3 in the others. That does NOT make those outputs into ones for 3-pin fans.

There is one small consequence of this limitation. Any mobo header has a second function - it monitors its fan's speed signal for fan FAILURE and can warn you if there is no speed signal. But when you use a Splitter OR a Hub, that failure monitoring cannot be done for the "other" fans whose signals cannot be sent to the header. So from time to time YOU should check that all your fans like that still are working.

Bottom line: as velocityg4 has suggested, you can use two 4-pin fan Splitters to connect two fans each to two headers, and that will do the job.
 
Apr 24, 2019
13
2
15
0
A fan hub uses 1 header as control, so all fans run at same speed, 2 fans or 10 fans. If your fans are different, in different areas this isn't always good. You'll want control of different areas, so 3 fans at intake are seperate from 2 top fans, seperate from rear exhaust.


That's a 3way pwm splitter. It'll use 1 header to control 3 fans, with just 1 fan as a lead fan. So if you have 3 fans at front intake, this keeps control of all 3 like a single fan unit. There's also 2way and 4way (has seperate power source) so you can mix and match according to plan, needs and control.
In that picture above, only 1 fan connector is 4pin, the other are 3pin. This is done on purpose, as there is only 1 header connection. So only 1 fan needs to report its speed. The header controls every fan according to the 1 fan speed, so all 3 fans operate the same.
sorry for delay guys,they are rated at 2100RPM so i dont think a 3way pwm spliter with one single header can give them enough juice😁.and the other problem is i cant find PWM splitters in my Country Unfortunately(no idea why).in that case my only Choice would be a fan hub
 
Apr 24, 2019
13
2
15
0
Your worry about the Splitters you have seen is not a worry. Background: any mobo fan header can deal with the speed signal (2 pulses per revolution) sent back to it from a fan on Pin #3, but ONLY from ONE fan. It cannot work with two or more pulse streams coming in. So all proper Splitters AND Hubs will send back to the mobo host header only ONE fan's speed signal, and ignore all the others. You will never "see" the "other" speeds, but this has NO impact on ability to control the speeds. The very simplest way to do this is that a Splitter such as you have seen simply will have Pin #3 in only ONE of its output connectors, and will have no Pin #3 in the others. That does NOT make those outputs into ones for 3-pin fans.

There is one small consequence of this limitation. Any mobo header has a second function - it monitors its fan's speed signal for fan FAILURE and can warn you if there is no speed signal. But when you use a Splitter OR a Hub, that failure monitoring cannot be done for the "other" fans whose signals cannot be sent to the header. So from time to time YOU should check that all your fans like that still are working.

Bottom line: as velocityg4 has suggested, you can use two 4-pin fan Splitters to connect two fans each to two headers, and that will do the job.
yea im worried cus i dont want my pc to sound like a tank:tearsofjoy:.it doesnt matter that i wont be able to control them individually i just wanted to know with fan hub or spliter(who knows i might found fan one at a local store)if i set one fan at a certain RPM the other fans would follow or they would go full speed,but thanks for the information
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Speed doesn't matter. If you look on the back of the fan, look for the Amperage rating. You can have upto 1.0A on a header, although I always err on the side of caution and don't go past 0.9A.

So with 3 fans, if total is 0.9A or less, you are good to use all 3 on a splitter. If the total is more, then use a powered 4way splitter, it uses molex power/Sata power not the header power. You could run 10 fans easily.

A hub is nothing more than a powered splitter in a block form. What's good about splitters is you keep your zones, a hub powers all the fans the same, doesn't seperate anything, so you have no control at all. Just change fan speeds.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Pwm: hot-ground-speed sensor-pwm signal. That's the setup wiring at the header and the primary connector. Fans 2-? have hot-ground-blank-pwm signal.
What happens is the primary sends its speed back to the mobo. No other fans do. The mobo adjusts the fan speed at the header, so any fan on that header (doesn't matter if it's a 2-way splitter or 10-way hub) gets the same pwm signal as the primary. All fans on that header see the same signal. The signal isn't rated at speeds, but duty cycle. A percentage. If the mobo wants it cooler, it sends a higher % signal. That % is according to the fan. If you have a 2000rpm fan, and get a 60% signal, the fan spins at 1200rpm±. If you have a 1000rpm fan and get a 60% signal, it'll spin at 600rpm.

This is why zone control can be important. Your 3 intakes are probably all the same, 2100rpm 120mm. On a 3way splitter, at 60% signal, all 3 fans will spin at 1260rpm±. If your 140mm exhaust is only a 1200rpm fan, and it's on a hub with the intakes, it will depend on which fan is primary. If the 140mm is primary, all fans will spin according to the mobo's desire. If it's running hot, it'll bump up duty cycle, maybe 80% to get the exhaust going faster. Unfortunately that also bumps the intakes to 80%. That starts getting loud. If the intakes are primary, and the mobo is running cool, it'll cut down the signal, maybe to 40%. That means your only exhaust is also at 40%, or a little over 400rpm. If the fan won't go down to 400rpm, it usually just stops.

Hubs primary purpose is multiple fan control from a single header. Like when you have 4,6,8 fans on a single radiator and want all those fans at the same speed. It's honestly better to keep exhaust zone seperate from intake zone, so fans can spin at different duty cycles according to what the motherboard says is needed. There's a temp sensor for almost all headers, only some are ganged. So the temp sensor for the intake header might be near the bottom-right corner. That spot never gets hot. The sensor for the exhaust header might be top-left, which always gets hot. Put all the fans on a hub and plug it into the intake header, your exhaust will run slow, even when the cpu/gpu is in gaming loads and cooking. Put the hub on the exhaust sensor, and your intakes will never slow down, spinning upto maximum when just surfing windows. Using splitters on both, the motherboard retains control of both, so exhausts can speed up and intakes slow down when temps from the individual sensors say its needed.
 
Last edited:
Apr 24, 2019
13
2
15
0
Speed doesn't matter. If you look on the back of the fan, look for the Amperage rating. You can have upto 1.0A on a header, although I always err on the side of caution and don't go past 0.9A.

So with 3 fans, if total is 0.9A or less, you are good to use all 3 on a splitter. If the total is more, then use a powered 4way splitter, it uses molex power/Sata power not the header power. You could run 10 fans easily.

A hub is nothing more than a powered splitter in a block form. What's good about splitters is you keep your zones, a hub powers all the fans the same, doesn't seperate anything, so you have no control at all. Just change fan speeds.
each fan is 0.5A so the total will be 1.5,in this case i need 3 2way splitters.i found a 2way splitter but one of the ends is 4pin the other is 3pin,can i control my fan with that 3 pin?
 
Apr 24, 2019
13
2
15
0
Pwm: hot-ground-speed sensor-pwm signal. That's the setup wiring at the header and the primary connector. Fans 2-? have hot-ground-blank-pwm signal.
What happens is the primary sends its speed back to the mobo. No other fans do. The mobo adjusts the fan speed at the header, so any fan on that header (doesn't matter if it's a 2-way splitter or 10-way hub) gets the same pwm signal as the primary. All fans on that header see the same signal. The signal isn't rated at speeds, but duty cycle. A percentage. If the mobo wants it cooler, it sends a higher % signal. That % is according to the fan. If you have a 2000rpm fan, and get a 60% signal, the fan spins at 1200rpm±. If you have a 1000rpm fan and get a 60% signal, it'll spin at 600rpm.

This is why zone control can be important. Your 3 intakes are probably all the same, 2100rpm 120mm. On a 3way splitter, at 60% signal, all 3 fans will spin at 1260rpm±. If your 140mm exhaust is only a 1200rpm fan, and it's on a hub with the intakes, it will depend on which fan is primary. If the 140mm is primary, all fans will spin according to the mobo's desire. If it's running hot, it'll bump up duty cycle, maybe 80% to get the exhaust going faster. Unfortunately that also bumps the intakes to 80%. That starts getting loud. If the intakes are primary, and the mobo is running cool, it'll cut down the signal, maybe to 40%. That means your only exhaust is also at 40%, or a little over 400rpm. If the fan won't go down to 400rpm, it usually just stops.

Hubs primary purpose is multiple fan control from a single header. Like when you have 4,6,8 fans on a single radiator and want all those fans at the same speed. It's honestly better to keep exhaust zone seperate from intake zone, so fans can spin at different duty cycles according to what the motherboard says is needed. There's a temp sensor for almost all headers, only some are ganged. So the temp sensor for the intake header might be near the bottom-right corner. That spot never gets hot. The sensor for the exhaust header might be top-left, which always gets hot. Put all the fans on a hub and plug it into the intake header, your exhaust will run slow, even when the cpu/gpu is in gaming loads and cooking. Put the hub on the exhaust sensor, and your intakes will never slow down, spinning upto maximum when just surfing windows. Using splitters on both, the motherboard retains control of both, so exhausts can speed up and intakes slow down when temps from the individual sensors say its needed.
thanks for the information,this is all i wanted to know.ill try to find a splitter to separate intake from exhaust fans.
i have one more question:i have an aio liquid cooler that has a 3pin connector(a pump should go full speed) and i connected the pump to a fan header,but my mobo has a dedicated aio pump header,can i hook the pump to aio header so that i could have more fan header?i dont want to control the pump
 
Setting fans up so there is one group on a splitter and header that is the intakes, and a separate group for exhausts, is a good idea.Whether or not they will operate at different speeds depends on fine details of how you configure the individual fan headers.

All mobos have two main temperature sensors. One actually is inside the CPU chip and sends its signal out on a chip pin. That temp reading always is used to control cooling of the CPU via whatever device is plugged into the CPU_FAN header. Then there's a sensor built into the mobo by its maker at a spot they decided is important and representative. It usually is called the Motherboard Sensor and is used by default on most systems to guide the SYS_FAN or CHA_AFAN header(s). BUT some mobos set different defaults and MAY use the CPU sensor or something else for those headers, so you need to check how your system is set now. The, SOME mobos also have more sensors built into areas they consider important, like the North Bridge or Voltage Control areas. In my opinion, these are best used IF you plan to set one fan directed right at that mobo component, and configure that particular header to concentrate its cooling control on that item, rather than on the whole mobo and case. But for general case cooling, use the Motherboard general sensor. IF you do that and IF all the headers for case fans are set to use the same temp sensor and same control parameters, then all those fans will receive the same control signals and do very much the same thing.

Slight amendment to the header pinouts above. On fan headers, Pin #1 is the Ground, and Pin #2 is the + VDC power supply.

Regarding the pump component of your AIO system, yes, plug that into the mobo's AIO_PUMP header. You are right NOT to try to control its speed because most such systems want the pump running full speed all the time, and do all control of CPU cooling by changing the speed of the FANS on the radiator. And although the pump connector is the 3-pin type, the header you plug it into should be set to PWM Mode if that's available. This uses a quirk of fan design to ensure that the pump always receives the full +12 VDC supply it needs. Moreover, the AIO_PUMP header also will monitor that pump for FAILURE (that is, no speed signal coming back to the header) and warn you very quickly if it does fail, which would require quick action by you to shut down and prevent overheating. As you say, this would leave you with a SYS_FAN header free for other uses.
 
Apr 24, 2019
13
2
15
0
Setting fans up so there is one group on a splitter and header that is the intakes, and a separate group for exhausts, is a good idea.Whether or not they will operate at different speeds depends on fine details of how you configure the individual fan headers.

All mobos have two main temperature sensors. One actually is inside the CPU chip and sends its signal out on a chip pin. That temp reading always is used to control cooling of the CPU via whatever device is plugged into the CPU_FAN header. Then there's a sensor built into the mobo by its maker at a spot they decided is important and representative. It usually is called the Motherboard Sensor and is used by default on most systems to guide the SYS_FAN or CHA_AFAN header(s). BUT some mobos set different defaults and MAY use the CPU sensor or something else for those headers, so you need to check how your system is set now. The, SOME mobos also have more sensors built into areas they consider important, like the North Bridge or Voltage Control areas. In my opinion, these are best used IF you plan to set one fan directed right at that mobo component, and configure that particular header to concentrate its cooling control on that item, rather than on the whole mobo and case. But for general case cooling, use the Motherboard general sensor. IF you do that and IF all the headers for case fans are set to use the same temp sensor and same control parameters, then all those fans will receive the same control signals and do very much the same thing.

Slight amendment to the header pinouts above. On fan headers, Pin #1 is the Ground, and Pin #2 is the + VDC power supply.

Regarding the pump component of your AIO system, yes, plug that into the mobo's AIO_PUMP header. You are right NOT to try to control its speed because most such systems want the pump running full speed all the time, and do all control of CPU cooling by changing the speed of the FANS on the radiator. And although the pump connector is the 3-pin type, the header you plug it into should be set to PWM Mode if that's available. This uses a quirk of fan design to ensure that the pump always receives the full +12 VDC supply it needs. Moreover, the AIO_PUMP header also will monitor that pump for FAILURE (that is, no speed signal coming back to the header) and warn you very quickly if it does fail, which would require quick action by you to shut down and prevent overheating. As you say, this would leave you with a SYS_FAN header free for other uses.
sorry for the delay 😁
i plugged my AIO pump to its proper header,thank you for all of your information
 
Reactions: DMAN999

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS