Question Need Help Understanding Digi+ VRM Settings (Asus X570)(3700X)

DUAL33s

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Aug 14, 2019
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I've recently been having a blast overclocking and tweaking my new setup (3700X / Asus ROG Strix X570-E Gaming / Trident Z Neo (3600 CL16) (B-die) / Red Devil 5700XT) because basically I'm a nerd and I hate my life...lol

But anyway...I've finally been having some success as far as OCing my new set of Trident Z Neo (Samsung B-die) memory, as well as pushing my CPU to 4.3ghz @ about 1.35v (which is pretty damn good as far as I can tell). But as always, I'm looking to push it even further, because again...I hate my life.

That said, this is my first time working with the X570 platform, as well as my first Asus motherboard and Ryzen 3000 CPU. So there are a few settings in the Digi+ VRM section of the X570-E's bios, that I am having a bit of trouble understanding/configuring. I am familiar with Load Line Calibration and Spread Spectrum and have worked with them a lot in the past.. but this is the first mobo I've owned that also has settings for Power Phase Control, Power Duty Control, Switching Frequency and Current Capability.

Now, a few of these settings seem to be 'self explanatory' (such as Current Capability)...but again, this is my first time working with these settings and I would appreciate if someone could give me a brief definition/explanation of how these settings affect the CPU, DRAM, VRM etc. and also how they also affect power draw, current, etc. And if you could also give me a few suggestions or 'starting points', as well as explain what would be considered 'safe' for my particular setup, I will be more than appreciative and I will write you a nice long heart felt thank you letter

Thank you in advance for any help you might provide...I will post my full system specs below as well as an image pointing out the settings in question.

-DUAL33s

SYSTEM SPECS:

CPU
: Ryzen 7 3700X
MOBO: ASUS ROG STRIX X570-E Gaming w/ the latest bios installed (1404)
RAM: Trident X Neo 3600 (16-16-16-16-36)
GPU: PowerColor Red Devil 5700XT
STORAGE: (1) Samsung M.2 nVME 500mb (1) Western Digital WD Blue SSD 1tb
PSU: Corsair Cx650 (650w / 80+ Bronze)
 

zx128k

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Nov 23, 2019
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3700x @ 1.35 volts is very good. Power Phase Control, Power Duty Control, Switching Frequency and Current Capability. Basically they control power to the cpu and how quickly the VRMs respond to changes in demands from the cpu.


VRM Switching Frequency The other way to lower voltage ripple is to increase how often you turn on the high side. This is dictated by the PWM controller's switching frequency. When you turn on the high side MOSFET your VRM output voltage starts to rise until the PWM signal turn it off again and your voltage starts to drop. The longer the wait between the on and off the longer the voltage will rise and drop increasing the minimum voltage and maximum voltage that your VRM outputs when trying to hit a set voltage. This is what ripple is. So if you cut down the amount of time you voltage spends dropping and rising by increasing the frequency of the PWM signal you decrease the ripple. This is why many overclocking centric boards have a VRM switching frequency option in the BIOS. The down side to this is that you need to charge your MOSFETs on and off more often and that lowers the VRM's efficiency.

Increasing the VRM switch frequency can increase the chance of a higher overclock but it also increases the VRM temperatures.

CPU Power Duty Control adjusts the current of every VRM phase and the thermal conditions of every phase component. Normally current or thermal balance.

CPU Power Thermal Control A higher temperature brings a wider CPU power thermal range and extends the overclocking tolerance to enhance the overclocking potential.

CPU Power Phase Control Increases the phase number under a heavy system load to get more transient and better thermal performance. Reduce the phase number under a light system load to increase the VRM efficiency.

Sources used. https://www.asus.com/us/support/FAQ/1036400/
https://cxzoid.blogspot.com/2015/04/what-makes-good-vrm.html
 
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DUAL33s

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Aug 14, 2019
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3700x @ 1.35 volts is very good. Power Phase Control, Power Duty Control, Switching Frequency and Current Capability. Basically they control power to the cpu and how quickly the VRMs respond to changes in demands from the cpu.


VRM Switching Frequency The other way to lower voltage ripple is to increase how often you turn on the high side. This is dictated by the PWM controller's switching frequency. When you turn on the high side MOSFET your VRM output voltage starts to rise until the PWM signal turn it off again and your voltage starts to drop. The longer the wait between the on and off the longer the voltage will rise and drop increasing the minimum voltage and maximum voltage that your VRM outputs when trying to hit a set voltage. This is what ripple is. So if you cut down the amount of time you voltage spends dropping and rising by increasing the frequency of the PWM signal you decrease the ripple. This is why many overclocking centric boards have a VRM switching frequency option in the BIOS. The down side to this is that you need to charge your MOSFETs on and off more often and that lowers the VRM's efficiency.

Increasing the VRM switch frequency can increase the chance of a higher overclock but it also increases the VRM temperatures.

CPU Power Duty Control adjusts the current of every VRM phase and the thermal conditions of every phase component. Normally current or thermal balance.

CPU Power Thermal Control A higher temperature brings a wider CPU power thermal range and extends the overclocking tolerance to enhance the overclocking potential.

CPU Power Phase Control Increases the phase number under a heavy system load to get more transient and better thermal performance. Reduce the phase number under a light system load to increase the VRM efficiency.

Sources used. https://www.asus.com/us/support/FAQ/1036400/
https://cxzoid.blogspot.com/2015/04/what-makes-good-vrm.html
WOW thank you so much for this very in-depth response! I really appreciate the time you took to explain these things to me.

I am going to look further into it and also watch the video you provided. I watched a very good video by Buildzoid last night where he was using a digital multimeter to check the changes in VRM voltage when manipulating Switching Freq. and other VRM/power settings etc. Very interesting.

thanks again! much appreciated! \m/
 

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