Question Need help with a cooling issue

Sep 24, 2019
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So i've had a cooling problem for years now and I want to get this sorted out.

Essentially, last week, my PSU died. Because of this, im going to have to rebuild my PC so I thought id try and get this problem out of the way.

Whenever I do anything intensive, such as playing games, my CPU can get quite hot, but its mainly my GPU. It consistently hits 80c +

I did get a better CPU fan in the end (noctua nh-u14s) but I never got around to sorting out the GPU.

I dont know why it gets so hot. My room isnt boiling hot or anything. I have 2 140mm case fans at the front of my case, and a 140mm fan at the top.

Not sure if this is a massive problem, but the 2 fans at the front are set at a low RPM to make the system quieter (https://noctua.at/en/nf-p14s-redux-900 )

I would like to install more case fans, as this could solve the issue? but I dont know if my motherboard can support it. I have the H110m pro-vd (https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/H110M-PRO-VD.html )

If I was to install more, could I just use a fan hub to connect it? or would I have to get a better motherboard that can support more fans?

To be honest the problem might also be the fact that the GPU is the mini version. Its the Zotac 1060 6gb mini. Meaning that it only has 1 fan, but I still think 80c+ is too high.

Appreciate any help on this
Thanks
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Essentially it looks to be the gpu. The mini's were designed for really small cases, tight quarters, where the input fans will have a maximum affect. The single fan isn't hurting, it'll do roughly the same job as 2x smaller fans, the 2 smaller fans just get better spread on the heatsink which on a full sized card is larger. As a consequence, mini's run hotter. Especially when pushed to limits by detail settings.

Changing input fans might work to some advantage. The P series has a rather broad aircone, they'll move plenty of air, but it's easily spread throughout the case. Having fans with higher static pressure or in a more directed cone, air pushed right to the gpu, might alleviate some of the heat, but maybe not enough to overcome the lack of heatsink size.
 
Did you replace the psu?
If so, what is the make/model?
What are the rest of your parts?

80c. is a normal thermal target for max performance of a graphics card.

A cpu cooler and a graphics card cooler need a good source of fresh air to let them do their job.
Seems to me that you should allow the front intakes to run faster to supply more air.
Normally, two front 140mm intakes will supply all the cooling air you might ever need for a hot processor and graphics card.
Noctua makes some very good 140mm fans that are relatively quiet.

If noise is a problem to you consider replacing the case
 
Reactions: SgtScream
Sep 24, 2019
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Did you replace the psu?
If so, what is the make/model?
What are the rest of your parts?

80c. is a normal thermal target for max performance of a graphics card.

A cpu cooler and a graphics card cooler need a good source of fresh air to let them do their job.
Seems to me that you should allow the front intakes to run faster to supply more air.
Normally, two front 140mm intakes will supply all the cooling air you might ever need for a hot processor and graphics card.
Noctua makes some very good 140mm fans that are relatively quiet.

If noise is a problem to you consider replacing the case
I have a new PSU on the way by Corsair. I had the TX650M, and it blew after a year. Due to them not having any 650's available, they will give me a TX750M instead.

The case is the Meshify C case, and like I said in the post, I have a Zotac 1060 6gb mini GPU and I have the nh-u14s cpu cooler. The CPU I have is the i7-6700k, but I do not overclock it.

I do have 2 140mm noctua fans at the front of my case, but they are focused more on silence, and only run at 900 RPM, so I think I might replace them for 1200RPM fans, as this would help?

I also have a 140mm corsair fan at the top of my case, I would install another at the top but im not sure if my motherboard can support it. Would buying a fan hub/controller sort this problem?

Many people have told me it is the GPU, as the 1 fan does limit it quite a bit, but also the mini gpu has a small heatsink, but im not entirely sure.
 
Sep 24, 2019
11
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Essentially it looks to be the gpu. The mini's were designed for really small cases, tight quarters, where the input fans will have a maximum affect. The single fan isn't hurting, it'll do roughly the same job as 2x smaller fans, the 2 smaller fans just get better spread on the heatsink which on a full sized card is larger. As a consequence, mini's run hotter. Especially when pushed to limits by detail settings.

Changing input fans might work to some advantage. The P series has a rather broad aircone, they'll move plenty of air, but it's easily spread throughout the case. Having fans with higher static pressure or in a more directed cone, air pushed right to the gpu, might alleviate some of the heat, but maybe not enough to overcome the lack of heatsink size.
This is probably the case, many have also told me that the heatsink is very small on this GPU. Just wondering, if I was to swap out the case fans, I would be getting 2 140mm fans. Do you know any that are especially good for cooling? my current ones only spin at 900rpm so it isnt too good. I was looking at buying 2 of these (https://www.corsair.com/uk/en/Categories/Products/Fans/RGB-&-LED-Fans/iCUE-SP-Series-RGB-PRO-Performance/p/CO-9050095-WW )
 
OP, there is some really odd logic in your post. You have two large front fans for lots of air intake, BUT you have forced them to run slower so they are quiet. Since that may contribute to your GPU temperature concern, your proposal it to add more fans, which most certainly will add more noise.

There is no free lunch! (old saying) To get higher air flow and greater cooling, you need the fans to run faster AND that means they will generate more noise. Just a fact of life. Further, as a general rule most Noctua fans create LESS noise than many competitors' products for the same air flow. So you may already have the best equipment installed, and are just not using it to best advantage.

However you have limited those front fans' speeds, free them to do more. Use the full default automatic fan control capability of the fans' header(s) to start. Now, those fans' speeds will normally be governed by the temperature as measured by a sensor on the mobo, and not by the temperature of your graphics card. If it seems to you that they still do not push enough air through the case to help the card, most fan header configuration systems allow you an option for setting it different from the default condition. Usually it is something like a "Manual" or "Custom" "fan curve". That is, a graph of what speed the fan should run at four or five measured temperatures. You can change that so that the front fans are forced to run faster that the "normal" default fan curve at most temperatures, so the fans deliver more air under most conditions. This will be more than what the mobo "needs", but it should lower the temperature inside the case and give your graphics card a better chance of cooling itself a bit more.

By the way, Noctua often supplies with its fans a little device called a "Low Noise Adapter" that can be inserted into the fan's connection to the mobo header. It is just a small resistor that reduces the voltage supplied to the fan, thus reducing its speed, noise, and AIR FLOW. It is handy when you are forced to connect the fan to a fixed 12 VDC power supply (like, from the PSU) with no speed control ability. But when used with a mobo header that is executing automatic control, all it does is limit the maximum speed the fan can run when it is really needed! So do NOT use the "LNA" item if your fans are connected to a header using automatic control.
 
Sep 24, 2019
11
0
10
0
OP, there is some really odd logic in your post. You have two large front fans for lots of air intake, BUT you have forced them to run slower so they are quiet. Since that may contribute to your GPU temperature concern, your proposal it to add more fans, which most certainly will add more noise.

There is no free lunch! (old saying) To get higher air flow and greater cooling, you need the fans to run faster AND that means they will generate more noise. Just a fact of life. Further, as a general rule most Noctua fans create LESS noise than many competitors' products for the same air flow. So you may already have the best equipment installed, and are just not using it to best advantage.

However you have limited those front fans' speeds, free them to do more. Use the full default automatic fan control capability of the fans' header(s) to start. Now, those fans' speeds will normally be governed by the temperature as measured by a sensor on the mobo, and not by the temperature of your graphics card. If it seems to you that they still do not push enough air through the case to help the card, most fan header configuration systems allow you an option for setting it different from the default condition. Usually it is something like a "Manual" or "Custom" "fan curve". That is, a graph of what speed the fan should run at four or five measured temperatures. You can change that so that the front fans are forced to run faster that the "normal" default fan curve at most temperatures, so the fans deliver more air under most conditions. This will be more than what the mobo "needs", but it should lower the temperature inside the case and give your graphics card a better chance of cooling itself a bit more.

By the way, Noctua often supplies with its fans a little device called a "Low Noise Adapter" that can be inserted into the fan's connection to the mobo header. It is just a small resistor that reduces the voltage supplied to the fan, thus reducing its speed, noise, and AIR FLOW. It is handy when you are forced to connect the fan to a fixed 12 VDC power supply (like, from the PSU) with no speed control ability. But when used with a mobo header that is executing automatic control, all it does is limit the maximum speed the fan can run when it is really needed! So do NOT use the "LNA" item if your fans are connected to a header using automatic control.

If im honest, I'm not very good with all this tech stuff. I know the hardware parts, but I havent got a clue where they all plug in and stuff (I usually will pay someone to just build it for me) When I bought the fans, I was pretty young and I hadn't researched them very well. Im pretty sure I bought the wrong ones because I did mean to buy the 1200 RPM noctua fans, but instead I bought the 900 RPM noctua fans.

I dont really care about noise, id much rather have a cooler system than a quieter one.

Im not sure if its just the GPU that is the problem, because alot of people have told me the mini gpu has a small heatsink. So im assuming thats probably what is causing the problem.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
I run 2x 140mm intake fans averaging 500-600rpm. 900rpm isn't an issue in the slightest. You do not need gale force winds in a case, nor do you need to always run fans at max (mine max at 1100rpm and never get there). All you need is enough to get the air to Move.

Meshify C is one of the best airflow cases around, even with just a 120mm single rear exhaust. I don't see air Flow as being the issue.

Maybe the gpu is sitting in a Hotspot and could use more air directed at it, instead of flowing around it, maybe needs fan curve adjustment in Precision X/Afterburner, maybe it's just a mini with a smaller heatsink trying to do the job of a larger card with uber detail settings or 4k DSR.

Easy way to tell if it's a hotspot is by sticking a 120mm fan about halfway to the gpu, slightly under it, so it'd pickup intake air and shove it up under the gpu.

Check gpu usage, even maxed on a 1080p it shouldn't be much (if any) above @ 60% unless you have DSR enabled.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
Agreed.

Airflow doesn't have to mean fans running at 100%. It means that the ability for fans to bring in cool air for components and equally exhaust warm air (which in turn allows the displacement for cool air to fill).
 
What rpm are the front intakes running at?
Are you certain that they are running at all?
A tissue dangled in front of the case will confirm the airflow direction.

Are they connected to the motherboard or to the psu?

I know of only one noctua model that is limited to 900 rpm.
If you need to run at higher rpm, then yes, you will hear them.
If you replace fans, but some significantly stronger than what you need.
You can slow down a fan, but not speed it up past it's design limit.
Noctua normally comes with a couple of low noise adapters.
 

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