Question need help with watercooling

Tankydog

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Jun 8, 2016
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Hello everybody im going to be building a watercooled desk pc and have been looking around at some parts and I have been worried about corrosion I just want to know if I will run into any problems with the components im thinking of using??

CPU block: Thermaltake pacific w5
pump/res: Thermaltake pacific pt60-s
RAD: Thermaltake pacific RL360x2
GPU blocks: EKWB EK-FC1080 GTX strix x2
Fittings: EKWB EK-HDC 16mm green fittings x12
tubing: thermaltake V-tubler PETG 16mm
coolant: thermaltake TT premium T1000 transparent green

I want to know will all of this work together thanks to anyone who answers.
 
Have you done all the homework and research into custom loop cooling? Understanding the cost, always more than you plan for, is important. It's not to be taken lightly and fully understand risks and rewards. I try to advise this before folks on here decide to jump right in.
 

Gmoney06ss

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Jul 3, 2015
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I know the answer, but let's do a bit of trivia:

What will cause corrosion and do these components have much likelihood of doing so?
Is this open book? I've never been good at quizzes. Lol.

OP, is this your first loop? Since you're going hard tubing, I always recommend buying more tube than you think you'll need. You will make mistakes And waste tubing, almost guaranteed. Also recommend having high quality tools, such as the heat gun.
 

Tankydog

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Jun 8, 2016
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I know the answer, but let's do a bit of trivia:

What will cause corrosion and do these components have much likelihood of doing so?
Mixing metals in the loop is what causes the corrosion and also not using proper coolant I have heard can also effect this and the only thing I'm concerned about is the radiator cause it says it's anti-corrosion but it's aluminium and isn't it bad to mix that with copper or nickel ??
 

Tankydog

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Jun 8, 2016
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Have you done all the homework and research into custom loop cooling? Understanding the cost, always more than you plan for, is important. It's not to be taken lightly and fully understand risks and rewards. I try to advise this before folks on here decide to jump right in.
I have been researching for a while now and I have been searching parts for a couple months now I know what I'm getting into and that's why I'm buying my components piece by piece so I know they exactly work together and I'm.getting everything right but thank you for your concern any advice you have would.be greatly appreciated
 

Tankydog

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Jun 8, 2016
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Is this open book? I've never been good at quizzes. Lol.

OP, is this your first loop? Since you're going hard tubing, I always recommend buying more tube than you think you'll need. You will make mistakes And waste tubing, almost guaranteed. Also recommend having high quality tools, such as the heat gun.
Thank you I will.be sure to do so and I have most of that kind of stuff already
 

Gmoney06ss

Reputable
Jul 3, 2015
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Being an aluminum radiator, anti corrosion or not, I wouldn't recommend it. Do you really want to risk it? I'd use an ek or xspc radiator. I personally use xspc, and like them. Decent price too. I'm also using ek coolant, as it has inhibitors in it, as well as anti corrosion. But the thermaltake should as well.
 

Tankydog

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Jun 8, 2016
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Being an aluminum radiator, anti corrosion or not, I wouldn't recommend it. Do you really want to risk it? I'd use an ek or xspc radiator. I personally use xspc, and like them. Decent price too. I'm also using ek coolant, as it has inhibitors in it, as well as anti corrosion. But the thermaltake should as well.
Yeah that's the only thing I really was worried about everything else is copper or nickel but thank you very much I think I will go with EK cause I'm going to be getting my GPU blocks from there anyway but I appreciate your advice
 
Yes, completely avoid the aluminum radiators in custom loops. Typically, the AIOs use these to keep costs down. I'd also recommend planning ahead as much as possible your loop layout to save on costs(and headaches). Extra tubing for hardline is definitely a must :) Be sure you have enough fittings and a few extras in case things don't fit quite like planned. I've personally never used Thermaltake WC parts, so no comment there. EK and XSPC are common on the forums as well. Just be sure and take your time and plenty of leak testing. This gets very expensive very quickly, and needs to be done right the first time. Also, it's good to plan your drain/fill setup in advance to allow for easy maintenance.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Staff member
...As other have mentioned, the inclusion of aluminum as a major (or even minor) metal in manufacture should raise alarm when working with copper and brass.

Hardline tubing takes a bit of learning to get bends down, so don't expect perfection right away. If you do not have a bending kit and heat gun, you will want to seek out something quality.

Understand your loop flow order to maximize your coolant flow rate, try to prevent sharp angles, excessive usage of fittings and ensure you are taking into account block inlet/outlet ports, if they apply.

Custom watercooling is one of the most rewarding hobbies in terms of PC building, but also very time consuming. Where most builders just snap parts in and boot up, you have to account for tubing, coolant and leak testing and if you need to swap out a component, often times this requires repetition of these steps all over again.

Most leaks are due to user error - incorrect tubing lengths or bends, loose fittings, stress on hardline tubing that results in tubing pulling apart from components, pump or block inlet/outlet issues, etc. Make sure you triple check everything...nothing can be left to chance.

Not every leak or spill results in absolute doom; but left uncorrected it will certainly become so.
 
Reactions: Tankydog
+1 on rubix_1011's comments. These are all very valid points. The more OCD you are with taking your time and getting everything right the better. I find it very rewarding as well, but you must have plenty of patience and not rush things. If planned and done correctly, you can enjoy a near silent PC regardless of workload, best OCs & boostclocks, and the look is fantastic. A few more points to add. This isn't a build and use forever without a checkup type of hobby when it comes to custom loops. They require maintenance time to time. Fresh coolant, cleaning blocks, radiators,fittings, ect. on occasion depending on configuration. Also, you'll often see mention of cost, as often it can be the same as PC components themselves. This is why most custom builds have top-end hardware. Otherwise, it's generally recommended to spend more towards betters PC parts. That said, there is nothing wrong with custom WC because you can and want to regardless.
 
Last edited:

Tankydog

Commendable
Jun 8, 2016
20
0
1,510
0
Yes, completely avoid the aluminum radiators in custom loops. Typically, the AIOs use these to keep costs down. I'd also recommend planning ahead as much as possible your loop layout to save on costs(and headaches). Extra tubing for hardline is definitely a must :) Be sure you have enough fittings and a few extras in case things don't fit quite like planned. I've personally never used Thermaltake WC parts, so no comment there. EK and XSPC are common on the forums as well. Just be sure and take your time and plenty of leak testing. This gets very expensive very quickly, and needs to be done right the first time. Also, it's good to plan your drain/fill setup in advance to allow for easy maintenance.
Yeah I have been planning this for awhile now I have a photo at home I will send it through to show my plans I haven't got everything but I'm buying them.slowly to ensure I have everything correct I.have most of my runs planned out and also my drain point will be under the table away from components and I will fill the whole system with the glass off and leave it running for a while day to test for leaks
 
That's good info to know. Look forward to the pics and setup plans. What components have been purchased so far and what are you trying to cool. Looks like 2 1080s so far. It's a great community here and there is tons of advice and tips to be found.
 

Tankydog

Commendable
Jun 8, 2016
20
0
1,510
0
...As other have mentioned, the inclusion of aluminum as a major (or even minor) metal in manufacture should raise alarm when working with copper and brass.

Hardline tubing takes a bit of learning to get bends down, so don't expect perfection right away. If you do not have a bending kit and heat gun, you will want to seek out something quality.

Understand your loop flow order to maximize your coolant flow rate, try to prevent sharp angles, excessive usage of fittings and ensure you are taking into account block inlet/outlet ports, if they apply.

Custom watercooling is one of the most rewarding hobbies in terms of PC building, but also very time consuming. Where most builders just snap parts in and boot up, you have to account for tubing, coolant and leak testing and if you need to swap out a component, often times this requires repetition of these steps all over again.

Most leaks are due to user error - incorrect tubing lengths or bends, loose fittings, stress on hardline tubing that results in tubing pulling apart from components, pump or block inlet/outlet issues, etc. Make sure you triple check everything...nothing can be left to chance.

Not every leak or spill results in absolute doom; but left uncorrected it will certainly become so.
Thank you very much I'm glad there is such a great community of people that can help people like me out it's a massive help and hopefully it all goes well
 

Tankydog

Commendable
Jun 8, 2016
20
0
1,510
0
+1 on rubix_1011's comments. These are all very valid points. The more OCD you are with taking your time and getting everything right the better. I find it very rewarding as well, but you must have plenty of patience and not rush things. If planned and done correctly, you can enjoy a near silent PC regardless of workload, best OCs & boostclocks, and the look is fantastic. A few more points to add. This isn't a build and use forever without a checkup type of hobby when it comes to custom loops. They require maintenance time to time. Fresh coolant, cleaning blocks, radiators,fittings, ect. on occasion depending on configuration. Also, you'll often see mention of cost, as often it can be the same as PC components themselves. This is why most custom builds have top-end hardware. Otherwise, it's generally recommended to spend more towards betters PC parts. That said, there is nothing wrong with custom WC because you can and want to regardless.
Thank you it's great to have so many people helping out
 

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