MasterYoda327

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May 26, 2019
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I don't know if this is the right section, but when this GPU, CPU, and other computer parts shortage crisis ends, I plan to build a new gaming PC. I have done a couple of builds in the past on either plastic or wooden tables, but I feel I should get a PC building mat that is designed for and safe to be used with computer and other electronic components during the building and use processes. I am not very familiar with this area so I would appreciate recommendations on trustworthy brands and sizes to look at for my building process. In case it helps, I plan to build my gaming PC using an ATX motherboard with a full tower case.

Thanks in advance.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Gamersnexus, linustechtips have mats, they are handy, especially the gamersnexus as it has a bunch of visuals and part recognition, movable static strap locations etc.

Not exactly cheap, but if that's what you really do feel you need, or want, they'll be what's best.
 

johnsoner13

Notable
Nov 24, 2019
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I have done a couple of builds in the past on either plastic or wooden tables, but I feel I should get a PC building mat that is designed for and safe to be used with computer and other electronic components during the building and use processes
Those are fine, mats are unneeded. Hell, when I work on computers I frequently do it on my carpet with socks on; no issues (not saying its ideal, but its hard to really damage your components). But if you really insist, get one by Gamersnexus
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Hah, carpet, socks, vacuum cleaner, been there-did that. Usually how I cleaned my old pc, too big to lug around, so just sat on the floor and attacked it.

That's not advice btw, so don't follow it, I've been building-fixing-cleaning pc's for 40 years, and seen and tried it all.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Mats are completely unnecessary. All you need to do to avoid ESD damage is grab parts by grounded areas (ex.: rear bracket for add-in boards, mounting holes and edges for motherboards, DIMMs, CPUs, etc. since the ground and power planes usually extend closer to edges than anything else you might touch) and making sure you touch the case as you take anything in/out of it, same thing when bringing any other two parts together.

Having an ESD mat won't save you from zapping components if you get careless with putting a charge on yourself before touching them in random places thinking the ESD mat will save you. The mat is only an extra layer of safety to add on top of good practice.
 
Reactions: Karadjgne

sonofjesse

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Jul 27, 2016
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Not needed, if you have extra money and a cool place to put them, might be cool.

I"m not saying you can't ZAP these with static, but I'm I am saying its not the 70's and 80's anymore either lol. I feel like back then it was a larger risk.

Good luck on your build.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
I feel like back then it was a larger risk.
Just the opposite. Today's equipment is seriously more complex, with much tighter tolerances overall, just look at all that's on a motherboard or the differences in gpu composition and the need for DC/DC and LLC in a psu.

Just like a few years ago a shade-tree mechanic could fine tune a carburetor, today's mechanics need computer education just to figure out fuel injection ratios and MAF sensor readings.

Static electricity is no joke, especially to anyone living or working on a pc anywhere near high tension power lines.

To some ppl $70 or $80 is money well spent for peace of mind, beats the alternative, like replacing a gpu that got hit when you get complacent and forget to touch the case because it's the last item before power up and COD is right there at your fingertips.
 

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