Question Never experienced this kind of problem with a motherboard, I need help.

Pegasus195

Commendable
May 5, 2017
10
0
1,510
0
Hello guys my motherboard which is the Gigabyte Aorus B450 Elite (rev 1.0) recently just didn't turn on for any reason, not during when the system is on, but after putting my computer to "sleep". So to let you guys know what I was doing before this happen, I was learning 3D modeling in Blender and put the computer to sleep cause I need to go somewhere. Once I got back a few hours later, I casually turn the power button yet it won't turn on. My keyboard idle LEDs are on, I can charge my phone and few other devices via the motherboard USB outputs (even checked it with a USB Voltage/Current Tester). So I went to the internet hoping yo get some answers and I got results contrary to my problem, working motherboard, dead usb ports, but my problem is working usb ports but "dead" motherboard.

Here are the things I did before assuming the problem is my mobo:

1. Check if the power switch from my case is broken/faulty with multi tester (power switch is OK), even tried manually jumping the switch pins with a tweezer and no result.

2. See if the PSU is dead by manually jumping the green and black cable from the ATX connector (HDD motor runs, Fans connected to Molex also runs)

3. Clear CMOS and remove & putting back the 3V button battery in the mobo several times....(My mobo that I purchase via Amazon.com didn't have any warranty stickers over/covering the battery so I'm not removing the warranty whatsoever) yet no result whatsoever, even though I don't overclock my system yet, so there shouldn't be any problem with the bios?

4. I tried turning off the whole system with the PSU switch, then turn it back on when my motherboard RGB LED did flash a white LED, and that is normal since everytime I turn on the PSU my mobo LED does flash white light when power is connected. So LED and USB ports (even the port from the case) works since it indicates electricity flowing through, but my motherboard just won't turn on the system?

5. Lastly, I never update my BIOS so it's still the same mobo BIOS since purchase in March 2019.

If anybody can help me figure out what is wrong with my mobo, it will help me a lot. The reason I haven't contacted Gigabyte is because I bought the mobo via amazon in the U.S, but I bring it back to my country (Indonesia) and I'm just afraid they won't help me because I don't know if they got international warranty. Thanks, I appreciate it...

P.S the only thing I overclock/tune in this system is my GPU (Vega 56) which I undervolt via the Adrenalin software.
 

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
Do you have another PSU to test with? Yours is one of those off-brand Chinese cheapos and I've never run into an actual teardown, which concerns me (never buy a PSU for which you can't find an actual teardown/proper review testing or isn't on a known platform that has one). That you can jump it doesn't really mean anything other than that it's not completely dead as a doornail.
 

Pegasus195

Commendable
May 5, 2017
10
0
1,510
0
I got a Thermaltake Litepower 400, and many other chinese off-brands. Is the problem with the PSU not the Motherboard?
Do you have another PSU to test with? Yours is one of those off-brand Chinese cheapos and I've never run into an actual teardown, which concerns me (never buy a PSU for which you can't find an actual teardown/proper review testing or isn't on a known platform that has one). That you can jump it doesn't really mean anything other than that it's not completely dead as a doornail.
 

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
I got a Thermaltake Litepower 400, and many other chinese off-brands. Is the problem with the PSU not the Motherboard?
The Thermaltake isn't any good either, but as long as you don't get it at load, it's safe enough to see if things can turn on with it.

It may or may not be your PSU. But it can also be both, in that a junky PSU could destroy a motherboard. That's the problem with cheaping out with the PSU; it becomes a complicating factor in every single hardware issue, even when it's not obviously the direct cause.
 

Pegasus195

Commendable
May 5, 2017
10
0
1,510
0
The Thermaltake isn't any good either, but as long as you don't get it at load, it's safe enough to see if things can turn on with it.

It may or may not be your PSU. But it can also be both, in that a junky PSU could destroy a motherboard. That's the problem with cheaping out with the PSU; it becomes a complicating factor in every single hardware issue, even when it's not obviously the direct cause.
Hmm I'll try using other PSUs just to see if my mobo can actually turn on. Do you have any recommendations of a good PSU at 500W+? I know Vega 56 recommend PSU is 650 but that's because if you overclock it? I undervolt it and maximum TDP is 165W so 500W seems to be fine right?
 

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
Hmm I'll try using other PSUs just to see if my mobo can actually turn on. Do you have any recommendations of a good PSU at 500W+? I know Vega 56 recommend PSU is 650 but that's because if you overclock it? I undervolt it and maximum TDP is 165W so 500W seems to be fine right?
"Requirements" for PSUs are generally on the high side because the GPU manufacturers know that people will try to play them on marginal PSUs. Sometimes, a dodgy 600W power supply is actually a mislabeled 350W power supply rather than pure junk. If you're undervolting it, it depends on how far; a stock Vegas 56 has a spec of around 210W, but you can push it to 250W fairly easily.

Generally speaking, a Corsair CX 550 (not the older models at slightly different wattages with green lettering) would be the least expensive PSU worth buying. But it won't hurt to test on the Thermaltake to see just how bad the situation is; I'd replace the PSU even if it's not the problem to get the PSU questions out of the mix for now and the fture.
 

Pegasus195

Commendable
May 5, 2017
10
0
1,510
0
"Requirements" for PSUs are generally on the high side because the GPU manufacturers know that people will try to play them on marginal PSUs. Sometimes, a dodgy 600W power supply is actually a mislabeled 350W power supply rather than pure junk. If you're undervolting it, it depends on how far; a stock Vegas 56 has a spec of around 210W, but you can push it to 250W fairly easily.

Generally speaking, a Corsair CX 550 (not the older models at slightly different wattages with green lettering) would be the least expensive PSU worth buying. But it won't hurt to test on the Thermaltake to see just how bad the situation is; I'd replace the PSU even if it's not the problem to get the PSU questions out of the mix for now and the fture.
It looks like a good PSU, but damn it's $90 here in my country...
 

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
It looks like a good PSU, but damn it's $90 here in my country...
It's unfortunate. Where are you located? Sadly, non-Western countries tend to get significantly worse pricing than we do. Combine that with lower incomes and it's a double-edged sword that really sucks.

As I said, your next step can be to test with the Thermaltake.

(Edit: Oh, Indonesia. Me no read good.)
 

Pegasus195

Commendable
May 5, 2017
10
0
1,510
0
It's unfortunate. Where are you located? Sadly, non-Western countries tend to get significantly worse pricing than we do. Combine that with lower incomes and it's a double-edged sword that really sucks.

As I said, your next step can be to test with the Thermaltake.

(Edit: Oh, Indonesia. Me no read good.)
Lol yeah the tax and import fees makes prices 50% more expensive or even more sometimes. Yes I will try using the Thermaltake...
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
As far as choosing a new PSU goes, this should help somewhat with knowing what models to look for:

Let's start with the biggest misconception out there, which is that if a unit has high watts it will be ok or is good. Well, that couldn't be further from the truth.

There are plenty of 750-1000w units out there that I wouldn't trust to power a string of LED lights and might in fact be a much worse choice than a unit with a significantly lower listed capacity.

If the platform isn't good to begin with, how many watts or amps it says it can support is irrelevant.

Higher 80plus certification doesn't mean anything, UNLESS it is a PSU platform that we already know is good anyhow. For example, a Seasonic Prime platinum unit is going to be a better product than a Seasonic Prime Gold unit, because we already know the Prime platform is very good, and platinum efficiency along with it shows there are some improvements internally to account for the higher efficiency.

In a case like that, it might be worth it. It's likely the unit will create less heat, it will probably have better performance in regard to ripple, noise and voltage regulation. It might shave a few pennies, or dollars, off the electric bill over the course of a year.

Other than that, it is not going to perform any better than the same platform with Gold efficiency. On the other hand, just because a unit has Titanium 80plus ratings doesn't mean the unit is any good at all. For example, there are Raidmax units with Titanium efficiency and I wouldn't trust one of those to power a light bulb. There are a lot of units like this out there.

If the platform isn't good to begin with, whether or not it has an 80plus certification or is irrelevant.

Whatever you do, don't EVER buy a power supply based on whether it has RGB or lighting, or looks like it might be a quality unit. Some of the biggest hunks of junk out there look just as good as a Seasonic Prime Ultra Titanium, but I assure you, they are not. So far there are very few very good units out there that have RGB built in. Maybe one or two models, but rest assured you'll be be paying for the lighting, not for the quality of the power supply.

I don't know what country you reside in, and I know that sometimes it's hard to come by good units in some regions, but when possible, when it comes time to get that PSU, I'd stick to the following if you can.

Seasonic. Seasonic isn't just a brand, they are a PSU manufacturer, unlike many of the PSU brands you see they make their own power supply platforms AND a great many of the very good PSU models out there from other brands like Antec, Corsair and older XFX are made by Seasonic.

Just about anything made by Seasonic is good quality for the most part. There are really no bad Seasonic units and only a very few that are even somewhat mediocre. They do make a few less-good quality OEM style units, but mostly those are not going to be units you come across at most vendors, and they are still not bad. Also, the S12II and M12II 520 and 620w units are older, group regulated models. At one time they were among the best units you could buy. Now, they are outdated and not as good as almost any other Seasonic models. They are however still better than a LOT of newer designs by other manufacturers.

The Seasonic 520w and 620w S12II/M12II units CAN be used on newer Intel platforms, if you turn off C6/C7 in the bios, but I'd really recommend a newer platform whenever possible. Prices are usually pretty good on those though, so sometimes it's worth accepting the lack of DC-DC on the internal platform. Higher capacity versions of the High current gamer are not based on that platform, so they are fine. Those being the 750w and higher versions.

Most common currently, in order of preference, would be the Seasonic Focus series, then Focus plus, then Prime, then Prime ultra. It's worth mentioning that there are generally Gold, Platinum and Titanium versions within each, or most, of those series, but that does not necessarily mean that a Focus plus Platinum is necessarily better than a Prime Gold. It only means that it scored better in the 80plus efficiency testing, not that the platform is better.

Again, don't let yourself get tangled up in the idea that a higher 80plus rating specifically means that it is a better unit than another one with a lower rating, unless you know that it is a good platform from the start. All these Focus and Prime units are pretty good so you can somewhat focus on the 80plus rating when deciding which of them to choose.

Super Flower. Super Flower is another PSU manufacturer. They are like Seasonic and they make power supplies for a variety of other companies, like EVGA. Super Flower units are usually pretty good. I'd stick to the Leadex, Leadex II and Golden Green models.They also make most of the good units sold by EVGA like the G2, G3, P2 and T2 models.

Super Flower doesn't have a very broad availability for the units with their own brand name on them, and are not available in a lot of countries but for those where there is availability you want to look at the Leadex and Leadex II models. The Golden green platform is fairly decent too but is getting rather long in the tooth as a platform AND I've seen some reviews indicating a few shortcomings on units based on this platform.

Even so, it's a great deal better than a lot of other platforms out there so you could certainly do worse than a Golden green model. Units based on the Leadex and Leadex II platforms are much better though.

Corsair. The CX and CXm units are ok as a budget option, but I do not recommend pairing them with gaming cards. The newer 2017 models of CX and CXm are better than the older ones, but still not what we'd call terrific, so if it specifically says 2017 model, or it has a capacity other than an even 100, like 550w, 650w, 750w, etc., then it's likely at least better than those older ones. Aside from that, any of the TX, RMx, RMi, HX, HXi, AX or AXi units are good. Those are listed from best to worst, with the best being the AX and AXi units.

Antec. The True power classic units are made by Seasonic, and are very good, but are not modular. The High current gamer 520w and 620w, or any other PSU you see on the market that is 520w or 620w, are also made by Seasonic, based on the S12II and M12II platform for modern versions, and are pretty good units but again they are an older platform that is group regulated so if you go with a Haswell or newer Intel configuration you will want to avoid those because they do not support the C6/C7 Intel low power states.

The Antec High current gamer 750w and 850w units are very good and are not the older design, which came in 520w and 620w capacities and were good for back then but again, are an aging Seasonic platform that is not the best choice most of the time these days. Occasionally, these older units MIGHT be the best unit available and you could do worse than one of them, but a newer DC-DC platform is desirable when possible if it doesn't mean sacrificing quality elsewhere in the platform. There are however older and newer HCG models, so exact model number will likely be a factor if choosing one of these however both the older models and the newer models are good.

Antec Edge units are ok too, but reviews indicate that they have noisy fan profiles. I'd only choose this model if it is on sale or the aesthetics match up with your color scheme or design. Still a good power supply but maybe a little aggressive on the fan profile. This may have been cured on newer Edge models so reading professional tear down reviews is still the best idea.

Antec Earthwatts Gold units are very good also.

BeQuiet. BeQuiet does have a few decent models, BUT, you must be VERY selective about which of their models you put your trust in. From model to model their are huge differences in both quality and performance, even with the same series. If you cannot find a review for a BeQuiet unit on HardOCP, JonnyGuru or Tom's hardware that SPECIFICALLY says it is a very good unit, and does not have any significant issues in the "cons" category, I would avoid it. In fact, I'd probably avoid it anyhow unless there is a very great sale on one that has good reviews, because their units are generally more expensive than MUCH better units from Antec, Seasonic, EVGA and Corsair.

EVGA. They have BOTH good and not very good models.

Not very good are the W1, N1, B1, B3 (Most models failed testing), BQ, BR, BT and G1 NEX models.

Good models are the B2, G2, G2L, G3, GQ, P2 and T2 models.

FSP. They used to be very mediocre, and are a PSU manufacturer like Seasonic and Super Flower, although not as well trusted based on historical performance. Currently the FSP Hydro G and Hydro X units are pretty good.

I would avoid Thermaltake and Cooler Master.

They do have a few good units, but most of the models they sell are either poor or mediocre, and the ones they have that ARE good are usually way overpriced.

This is just ONE example of why I say that. Very new and modern CM unit. One of the worst scores ever seen on JonnyGuru for a well known brand name product. Doesn't look to be much better than a Raidmax unit. Sad.

Cooler Master Masterwatt Lite 600W review

And most of the models I have linked to the reviews of at the following link are at least good, with most of them being fantastic.

Power supply discussion thread

The Powerspec units sold my Microcenter are a mixed bag. Some of them are fairly decent using the same platform as the Sirfa High power astro lite platform, so not total dumpster fire type units, but not particularly good either, and some of their units are simply garbage and should be listed below in the DO NOT USE category, but I'm leaving them out because there are really no reviews of them and since there are a few units from them that are ok-ish, I'm giving them a "use at your own discretion but buy a better model if you can" grade.

A gray label CX or CXm unit would probably be an upgrade from one of those Powerspec models, without any doubt.

Certainly there ARE some good units out there that you won't see above among those I've listed, but they are few and far between, much as a hidden nugget of gold you find in a crevice among otherwise ordinary rocks and don't EVER assume a unit is good just because of the brand.

If you cannot find an IN DEPTH, REPUTABLE review on Tom's hardware, JonnyGuru, HardOCP, Hardware secrets (Old reviews by Gabe Torres), Kitguru (Only Aris reviews), TechPowerUP, SilentPC crew or a similar site that does much more than simply a review of the unboxing and basic tests that don't include reliable results for ripple, noise, voltage regulation and a complete teardown of the unit including identification of the internal platform, then the unit is a big fat question mark.

I recommend not trusting such units as companies generally always send out review samples of any unit they feel is going to get a good review, and don't send them out if they know they are going to get hammered by the reviewer. No review usually equals poor quality. Usually.


Other models that should never be trusted OR USED AT ALL, under any circumstances, include

A-Top, AK Power, Alpine, Apevia, Apex (Supercase/Allied), Artic, Ace, Aerocool (There might be one model worth using, but I'd still avoid them.), Aspire (Turbocase), Atadc, Atrix, Broadway com corp, Chieftech, Circle, CIT, Coolmax, Deer, Diablotek, Dynapower, Dynex, Eagletech, Enlight, Eurotech, Evo labs, EZ cool, Feedtek, Foxconn, G7, HEC/Compucase Orion, HEDY, High power, iBall, iStar computer co., Jeantec, JPac, Just PC, Kolink, LC Power, Linkworld electronics, Logisys, Macron, MSI, NmediaPC, Norwood Micro (CompUSA), Okia, Powercool, Powmax, Pulsepower, Q-tec, Raidmax, Rave, Rocketfish, Segotep, SFC, Sharkoon, Shuttle, Skyhawk, Spire, Startech, Storm, Sumvision, Tesla, Trust, Ultra, Wintech, Winpower, Xilence (Until I see a reputable review of a model showing different), xTreme (Cyberpower), Youngbear and Zebronics.

As far as figuring out whether the problem is the power supply, this COULD be helpful if you have access to a digital or analog volt meter.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ac7YMUcMjbw




As far as your current issues are concerned, I'd unplug the system from power. Then download the latest BIOS version and update the BIOS.

Next, go into BIOS and select the option to load Default settings on the Exit tab. Save, exit, back into BIOS and assign any custom settings you wish to configure.

Then, in boot into Windows and disable hibernation.

To disable Hibernation:
  1. The first step is to run the command prompt as administrator. In Windows 10, you can do this by right clicking on the start menu and clicking "Command Prompt (Admin)"
  2. Type in "powercfg.exe /h off" without the quotes and press enter. ...
  3. Now just exit out of command prompt.
Next, I would recommend that you run the Wagnard tools Display driver uninstaller (DDU) from safe mode, but first download the DDU, the latest AMD chipset drivers and the latest AMD graphics drivers.

DDU:

https://www.guru3d.com/files-details/display-driver-uninstaller-download.html

AMD chipset drivers:

https://www.amd.com/en/support/chipsets/amd-socket-am4/b450

AMD graphics drivers:

https://www.amd.com/en/support/graphics/radeon-rx-vega-series/radeon-rx-vega-series/radeon-rx-vega-56


Go into safe mode, run the already downloaded DDU. Afterwards, restart the system and once you are back in standard Windows mode, install the AMD drivers starting with the chipset drivers and finishing up with the graphics drivers.
 

Pegasus195

Commendable
May 5, 2017
10
0
1,510
0
As far as choosing a new PSU goes, this should help somewhat with knowing what models to look for:

Let's start with the biggest misconception out there, which is that if a unit has high watts it will be ok or is good. Well, that couldn't be further from the truth.

There are plenty of 750-1000w units out there that I wouldn't trust to power a string of LED lights and might in fact be a much worse choice than a unit with a significantly lower listed capacity.

If the platform isn't good to begin with, how many watts or amps it says it can support is irrelevant.

Higher 80plus certification doesn't mean anything, UNLESS it is a PSU platform that we already know is good anyhow. For example, a Seasonic Prime platinum unit is going to be a better product than a Seasonic Prime Gold unit, because we already know the Prime platform is very good, and platinum efficiency along with it shows there are some improvements internally to account for the higher efficiency.

In a case like that, it might be worth it. It's likely the unit will create less heat, it will probably have better performance in regard to ripple, noise and voltage regulation. It might shave a few pennies, or dollars, off the electric bill over the course of a year.

Other than that, it is not going to perform any better than the same platform with Gold efficiency. On the other hand, just because a unit has Titanium 80plus ratings doesn't mean the unit is any good at all. For example, there are Raidmax units with Titanium efficiency and I wouldn't trust one of those to power a light bulb. There are a lot of units like this out there.

If the platform isn't good to begin with, whether or not it has an 80plus certification or is irrelevant.

Whatever you do, don't EVER buy a power supply based on whether it has RGB or lighting, or looks like it might be a quality unit. Some of the biggest hunks of junk out there look just as good as a Seasonic Prime Ultra Titanium, but I assure you, they are not. So far there are very few very good units out there that have RGB built in. Maybe one or two models, but rest assured you'll be be paying for the lighting, not for the quality of the power supply.

I don't know what country you reside in, and I know that sometimes it's hard to come by good units in some regions, but when possible, when it comes time to get that PSU, I'd stick to the following if you can.

Seasonic. Seasonic isn't just a brand, they are a PSU manufacturer, unlike many of the PSU brands you see they make their own power supply platforms AND a great many of the very good PSU models out there from other brands like Antec, Corsair and older XFX are made by Seasonic.

Just about anything made by Seasonic is good quality for the most part. There are really no bad Seasonic units and only a very few that are even somewhat mediocre. They do make a few less-good quality OEM style units, but mostly those are not going to be units you come across at most vendors, and they are still not bad. Also, the S12II and M12II 520 and 620w units are older, group regulated models. At one time they were among the best units you could buy. Now, they are outdated and not as good as almost any other Seasonic models. They are however still better than a LOT of newer designs by other manufacturers.

The Seasonic 520w and 620w S12II/M12II units CAN be used on newer Intel platforms, if you turn off C6/C7 in the bios, but I'd really recommend a newer platform whenever possible. Prices are usually pretty good on those though, so sometimes it's worth accepting the lack of DC-DC on the internal platform. Higher capacity versions of the High current gamer are not based on that platform, so they are fine. Those being the 750w and higher versions.

Most common currently, in order of preference, would be the Seasonic Focus series, then Focus plus, then Prime, then Prime ultra. It's worth mentioning that there are generally Gold, Platinum and Titanium versions within each, or most, of those series, but that does not necessarily mean that a Focus plus Platinum is necessarily better than a Prime Gold. It only means that it scored better in the 80plus efficiency testing, not that the platform is better.

Again, don't let yourself get tangled up in the idea that a higher 80plus rating specifically means that it is a better unit than another one with a lower rating, unless you know that it is a good platform from the start. All these Focus and Prime units are pretty good so you can somewhat focus on the 80plus rating when deciding which of them to choose.

Super Flower. Super Flower is another PSU manufacturer. They are like Seasonic and they make power supplies for a variety of other companies, like EVGA. Super Flower units are usually pretty good. I'd stick to the Leadex, Leadex II and Golden Green models.They also make most of the good units sold by EVGA like the G2, G3, P2 and T2 models.

Super Flower doesn't have a very broad availability for the units with their own brand name on them, and are not available in a lot of countries but for those where there is availability you want to look at the Leadex and Leadex II models. The Golden green platform is fairly decent too but is getting rather long in the tooth as a platform AND I've seen some reviews indicating a few shortcomings on units based on this platform.

Even so, it's a great deal better than a lot of other platforms out there so you could certainly do worse than a Golden green model. Units based on the Leadex and Leadex II platforms are much better though.

Corsair. The CX and CXm units are ok as a budget option, but I do not recommend pairing them with gaming cards. The newer 2017 models of CX and CXm are better than the older ones, but still not what we'd call terrific, so if it specifically says 2017 model, or it has a capacity other than an even 100, like 550w, 650w, 750w, etc., then it's likely at least better than those older ones. Aside from that, any of the TX, RMx, RMi, HX, HXi, AX or AXi units are good. Those are listed from best to worst, with the best being the AX and AXi units.

Antec. The True power classic units are made by Seasonic, and are very good, but are not modular. The High current gamer 520w and 620w, or any other PSU you see on the market that is 520w or 620w, are also made by Seasonic, based on the S12II and M12II platform for modern versions, and are pretty good units but again they are an older platform that is group regulated so if you go with a Haswell or newer Intel configuration you will want to avoid those because they do not support the C6/C7 Intel low power states.

The Antec High current gamer 750w and 850w units are very good and are not the older design, which came in 520w and 620w capacities and were good for back then but again, are an aging Seasonic platform that is not the best choice most of the time these days. Occasionally, these older units MIGHT be the best unit available and you could do worse than one of them, but a newer DC-DC platform is desirable when possible if it doesn't mean sacrificing quality elsewhere in the platform. There are however older and newer HCG models, so exact model number will likely be a factor if choosing one of these however both the older models and the newer models are good.

Antec Edge units are ok too, but reviews indicate that they have noisy fan profiles. I'd only choose this model if it is on sale or the aesthetics match up with your color scheme or design. Still a good power supply but maybe a little aggressive on the fan profile. This may have been cured on newer Edge models so reading professional tear down reviews is still the best idea.

Antec Earthwatts Gold units are very good also.

BeQuiet. BeQuiet does have a few decent models, BUT, you must be VERY selective about which of their models you put your trust in. From model to model their are huge differences in both quality and performance, even with the same series. If you cannot find a review for a BeQuiet unit on HardOCP, JonnyGuru or Tom's hardware that SPECIFICALLY says it is a very good unit, and does not have any significant issues in the "cons" category, I would avoid it. In fact, I'd probably avoid it anyhow unless there is a very great sale on one that has good reviews, because their units are generally more expensive than MUCH better units from Antec, Seasonic, EVGA and Corsair.

EVGA. They have BOTH good and not very good models.

Not very good are the W1, N1, B1, B3 (Most models failed testing), BQ, BR, BT and G1 NEX models.

Good models are the B2, G2, G2L, G3, GQ, P2 and T2 models.

FSP. They used to be very mediocre, and are a PSU manufacturer like Seasonic and Super Flower, although not as well trusted based on historical performance. Currently the FSP Hydro G and Hydro X units are pretty good.

I would avoid Thermaltake and Cooler Master.

They do have a few good units, but most of the models they sell are either poor or mediocre, and the ones they have that ARE good are usually way overpriced.

This is just ONE example of why I say that. Very new and modern CM unit. One of the worst scores ever seen on JonnyGuru for a well known brand name product. Doesn't look to be much better than a Raidmax unit. Sad.

Cooler Master Masterwatt Lite 600W review

And most of the models I have linked to the reviews of at the following link are at least good, with most of them being fantastic.

Power supply discussion thread

The Powerspec units sold my Microcenter are a mixed bag. Some of them are fairly decent using the same platform as the Sirfa High power astro lite platform, so not total dumpster fire type units, but not particularly good either, and some of their units are simply garbage and should be listed below in the DO NOT USE category, but I'm leaving them out because there are really no reviews of them and since there are a few units from them that are ok-ish, I'm giving them a "use at your own discretion but buy a better model if you can" grade.

A gray label CX or CXm unit would probably be an upgrade from one of those Powerspec models, without any doubt.

Certainly there ARE some good units out there that you won't see above among those I've listed, but they are few and far between, much as a hidden nugget of gold you find in a crevice among otherwise ordinary rocks and don't EVER assume a unit is good just because of the brand.

If you cannot find an IN DEPTH, REPUTABLE review on Tom's hardware, JonnyGuru, HardOCP, Hardware secrets (Old reviews by Gabe Torres), Kitguru (Only Aris reviews), TechPowerUP, SilentPC crew or a similar site that does much more than simply a review of the unboxing and basic tests that don't include reliable results for ripple, noise, voltage regulation and a complete teardown of the unit including identification of the internal platform, then the unit is a big fat question mark.

I recommend not trusting such units as companies generally always send out review samples of any unit they feel is going to get a good review, and don't send them out if they know they are going to get hammered by the reviewer. No review usually equals poor quality. Usually.


Other models that should never be trusted OR USED AT ALL, under any circumstances, include

A-Top, AK Power, Alpine, Apevia, Apex (Supercase/Allied), Artic, Ace, Aerocool (There might be one model worth using, but I'd still avoid them.), Aspire (Turbocase), Atadc, Atrix, Broadway com corp, Chieftech, Circle, CIT, Coolmax, Deer, Diablotek, Dynapower, Dynex, Eagletech, Enlight, Eurotech, Evo labs, EZ cool, Feedtek, Foxconn, G7, HEC/Compucase Orion, HEDY, High power, iBall, iStar computer co., Jeantec, JPac, Just PC, Kolink, LC Power, Linkworld electronics, Logisys, Macron, MSI, NmediaPC, Norwood Micro (CompUSA), Okia, Powercool, Powmax, Pulsepower, Q-tec, Raidmax, Rave, Rocketfish, Segotep, SFC, Sharkoon, Shuttle, Skyhawk, Spire, Startech, Storm, Sumvision, Tesla, Trust, Ultra, Wintech, Winpower, Xilence (Until I see a reputable review of a model showing different), xTreme (Cyberpower), Youngbear and Zebronics.

As far as figuring out whether the problem is the power supply, this COULD be helpful if you have access to a digital or analog volt meter.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ac7YMUcMjbw




As far as your current issues are concerned, I'd unplug the system from power. Then download the latest BIOS version and update the BIOS.

Next, go into BIOS and select the option to load Default settings on the Exit tab. Save, exit, back into BIOS and assign any custom settings you wish to configure.

Then, in boot into Windows and disable hibernation.

To disable Hibernation:
  1. The first step is to run the command prompt as administrator. In Windows 10, you can do this by right clicking on the start menu and clicking "Command Prompt (Admin)"
  2. Type in "powercfg.exe /h off" without the quotes and press enter. ...
  3. Now just exit out of command prompt.
Next, I would recommend that you run the Wagnard tools Display driver uninstaller (DDU) from safe mode, but first download the DDU, the latest AMD chipset drivers and the latest AMD graphics drivers.

DDU:

https://www.guru3d.com/files-details/display-driver-uninstaller-download.html

AMD chipset drivers:

https://www.amd.com/en/support/chipsets/amd-socket-am4/b450

AMD graphics drivers:

https://www.amd.com/en/support/graphics/radeon-rx-vega-series/radeon-rx-vega-series/radeon-rx-vega-56


Go into safe mode, run the already downloaded DDU. Afterwards, restart the system and once you are back in standard Windows mode, install the AMD drivers starting with the chipset drivers and finishing up with the graphics drivers.
Sadly the problem isn't my PSU, it works just fine... It works when I try powering my other PCs, and my Thermaltake PSU which has been used since 2015 is still running but can't run the Aorus motherboard...

So the problem really is the motherboard.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Do the other systems you are saying work with those power supplies ALSO have a high draw video card like the Vega 56 installed? Probably not. Did you try powering those systems on using the same power supplies, WITH the Vega 56 installed in them?

You realize that card POTENTIALLY adds as much as 375w peak power consumption and probably pulls at least 150w briefly during startup?

I'm not saying that you aren't correct and that this may not be a board problem, I'm just saying that you have a very high draw system and are trying to use KNOWN low quality power supplies to run it. Try starting those other systems with that graphics card installed in them, and see what happens. I'll bet it doesn't. Maybe, but I'd be very skeptical.

Worth trying anyhow. Just because a power supply is able to start and run what is likely a very low power demand system, doesn't mean it's going to work well, or at all, in a different system. Power supplies aren't black and white, works or doesn't work. There is a definite gray area where it can supply a certain amount of power in some cases but in others simply craps out because it cannot supply what is needed and protections kick in or it just refuses to play ball.

The Gamemax GM-700 is pure garbage and the Thermaltake litepower 400 doesn't even have the two 8 pin connectors that would be required to run that graphics card. Since your CPU does not have integrated graphics, unless you have another low power graphics card to use in place of your Vega 56, there's no way you could use that power supply to test that system anyhow, and even if you could, that unit is EXTREMELY low quality as well.

Neither of those units, I am sorry to say, are even remotely trustworthy or reliable, even when they were new, which it sounds like they definitely are not so even less so with some miles on them.

But if you have another graphics card, a low power model, that is KNOWN to be good, and does not require ANY 6 or 8 pin power connections, slot power only, that you can use in this board for testing with the Gamemax unit connected, and it still won't power on, then I might tend to believe it may at least be possible that it is a board issue. Until then, I would still be leaning heavily towards the power supplies and not the motherboard. A board failure is certainly possible as well, since either of those power supplies could have not only developed internal failures but caused damage to the motherboard AS WELL.
 

Pegasus195

Commendable
May 5, 2017
10
0
1,510
0
Do the other systems you are saying work with those power supplies ALSO have a high draw video card like the Vega 56 installed? Probably not. Did you try powering those systems on using the same power supplies, WITH the Vega 56 installed in them?

You realize that card POTENTIALLY adds as much as 375w peak power consumption and probably pulls at least 150w briefly during startup?

I'm not saying that you aren't correct and that this may not be a board problem, I'm just saying that you have a very high draw system and are trying to use KNOWN low quality power supplies to run it. Try starting those other systems with that graphics card installed in them, and see what happens. I'll bet it doesn't. Maybe, but I'd be very skeptical.

Worth trying anyhow. Just because a power supply is able to start and run what is likely a very low power demand system, doesn't mean it's going to work well, or at all, in a different system. Power supplies aren't black and white, works or doesn't work. There is a definite gray area where it can supply a certain amount of power in some cases but in others simply craps out because it cannot supply what is needed and protections kick in or it just refuses to play ball.

The Gamemax GM-700 is pure garbage and the Thermaltake litepower 400 doesn't even have the two 8 pin connectors that would be required to run that graphics card. Since your CPU does not have integrated graphics, unless you have another low power graphics card to use in place of your Vega 56, there's no way you could use that power supply to test that system anyhow, and even if you could, that unit is EXTREMELY low quality as well.

Neither of those units, I am sorry to say, are even remotely trustworthy or reliable, even when they were new, which it sounds like they definitely are not so even less so with some miles on them.

But if you have another graphics card, a low power model, that is KNOWN to be good, and does not require ANY 6 or 8 pin power connections, slot power only, that you can use in this board for testing with the Gamemax unit connected, and it still won't power on, then I might tend to believe it may at least be possible that it is a board issue. Until then, I would still be leaning heavily towards the power supplies and not the motherboard. A board failure is certainly possible as well, since either of those power supplies could have not only developed internal failures but caused damage to the motherboard AS WELL.
Yes my 700W Gamemax PSU was capable of running other systems like my FX6300+GTX960 and I tried running my Vega 56 w/ the FX6300 and it did run. I also tried running my "broken" Motherboard with the CPU only attached, and it did not run. So yes surprisingly my Chinese Gamemax 700W PSU is good and still running...
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
In that case I'd have to agree with you that it's likely to be a board issue. I'd prefer to see it stripped down and bench tested before saying that for certain though.

 

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