[SOLVED] New 2019 PC Build - Yay? Nay?

Irishsullie

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Nov 7, 2012
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Hey everyone, I am doing a new build. Wanted to have my build looked at and see if anyone thinks there are better options or fits or if you think this looks pretty good. Pretty much at my budget with this current build.

Also does anyone have the 570X case and the Kraken X52? I would like to install it to the front of the case probably right on the front fans, and wanted to see if anyone had experience with that. I've also heard of annoyances with the software for the Kraken X52. Any thoughts in general would be greatly appreciated!

CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($409.70 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: NZXT - Kraken X52 Rev 2 73.11 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($147.88 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus - ROG MAXIMUS XI HERO (WI-FI) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($278.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($125.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($270.32 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB ROG Strix Gaming OC Video Card ($769.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair - Crystal 570X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($159.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($117.39 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($99.39 @ OutletPC)
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Are you more concerned about performance, or is aesthetics and noise levels your primary consideration on the AIO cooler? I'd definitely avoid any NZXT product that requires you to use their CAM software. It's garbage, and more importantly, it's mining your personal data.

If you take a read in this thread, I think you'll be horrified, and will quickly drop the idea of using the X52. I no longer use any NZXT hardware in my system except for my Hue+ and I'm running that with 3rd party open source lighting software.
 
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Irishsullie

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Nov 7, 2012
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Are you more concerned about performance, or is aesthetics and noise levels your primary consideration on the AIO cooler? I'd definitely avoid any NZXT product that requires you to use their CAM software. It's garbage, and more importantly, it's mining your personal data.

If you take a read in this thread, I think you'll be horrified, and will quickly drop the idea of using the X52. I no longer use any NZXT hardware in my system except for my Hue+ and I'm running that with 3rd party open source lighting software.
I was hoping for both aesthetics and performance, but I'm not sold on having to use NZXT hardware and am definitely open to other options. Do you have any recommendations for the CPU cooler? I will always prefer performance over looks, but if I can also get the looks too that's great.
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
I would actually suggest downgrading that 1TB SSD because you should always have your data separate from your OS. You should get somewhere between 250 - 500GB for the M2 and then at least a 2TB mass storage drive. 2TB SSDs are currently too expensive to recommend but a 2TB+ mass storage drive you can easily get for ~$100 right now.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Larger SSDs are always faster than smaller ones of the same model in practically every case. That applies to both M.2 and SATA, so saying that a larger primary drive is not recommended, is not recommended. Better would be to say that unless you can afford to do BOTH, get a big SSD (Whether M.2 or SATA) AND get a large secondary drive (And preferably also a third backup drive, since having all your data in only ONE location, whether it is the OS drive or another, secondary drive, is a bad idea. Drives ALL fail. If you only have that data on one drive and there is a problem, that data is GONE.

Even spending thousands of dollars with a recovery lab may not get it back. Better to spend an extra 50-100 bucks for a third drive to backup both the OS image AND whatever is on the data drive, so there are are always two copies of anything important or critical to you.)

Personally, I'd forget about the RGB on the memory modules. Most of the RGB on the DIMMs out there either don't work right, only work right with certain boards or work intermittently anyhow. Get you RGB fix elsewhere in the build and save a few bucks. Besides which, if you have lighting ANYWHERE else in the build, it's unlikely the RGB on the memory is going to be readily apparent without professional photography lenses and filters anyhow due to the fact that the other lighting will dampen the effect. I guess that's up to personal choice but for me, I think it's a waste. Not RGB necessarily, just on certain things. Fans, lighting strips, cases that come with it built in, motherboards, these are all pretty much ok. Everthing else, is overkill or just doesn't work right.

Also, the EVGA cards are superior to pretty much everybody else, and even if they were not superior due to the XC models being binned, their support absolutely exceeds what anybody else offers. For any Nvidia gaming card it is very hard for me to recommend any other brand unless there is an exceptional deal on a specific model at the time. In this case, I think this is a much better card and there is no other company I know of with the same level of customer support as EVGA.

I'd probably recommend something along these lines, while still trying to mostly stay close to what you had selected. Also, unless you don't currently have a system running Windows 7, 8 or 10, or if you do but you plan to continue using that operating system on that machine, then there is no reason to buy a new Windows 10 license because you can simply move it from the current system to the new one, clean install and all.

If you don't need Windows, this saves you about 140 bucks. If you do need it, then it only saves you about 50 bucks. But I think overall it's a better use of the money and there are a couple of significant changes there for the better, including the Seasonic Prime Gold PSU that is at least somewhat better than that G3, not that the G3 isn't pretty good because it is.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($407.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair - H100i PRO 75 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus - ROG MAXIMUS XI HERO (WI-FI) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($284.70 @ Newegg Business)
Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($105.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($126.63 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Crucial - MX500 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Adorama)
Video Card: EVGA - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card ($779.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair - Crystal 570X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($159.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - PRIME Ultra Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($128.41 @ Amazon)
Total: $2233.66
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-23 02:41 EDT-0400
 

Irishsullie

Honorable
Nov 7, 2012
47
0
10,530
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Larger SSDs are always faster than smaller ones of the same model in practically every case. That applies to both M.2 and SATA, so saying that a larger primary drive is not recommended, is not recommended. Better would be to say that unless you can afford to do BOTH, get a big SSD (Whether M.2 or SATA) AND get a large secondary drive (And preferably also a third backup drive, since having all your data in only ONE location, whether it is the OS drive or another, secondary drive, is a bad idea. Drives ALL fail. If you only have that data on one drive and there is a problem, that data is GONE.

Even spending thousands of dollars with a recovery lab may not get it back. Better to spend an extra 50-100 bucks for a third drive to backup both the OS image AND whatever is on the data drive, so there are are always two copies of anything important or critical to you.)

Personally, I'd forget about the RGB on the memory modules. Most of the RGB on the DIMMs out there either don't work right, only work right with certain boards or work intermittently anyhow. Get you RGB fix elsewhere in the build and save a few bucks. Besides which, if you have lighting ANYWHERE else in the build, it's unlikely the RGB on the memory is going to be readily apparent without professional photography lenses and filters anyhow due to the fact that the other lighting will dampen the effect. I guess that's up to personal choice but for me, I think it's a waste. Not RGB necessarily, just on certain things. Fans, lighting strips, cases that come with it built in, motherboards, these are all pretty much ok. Everthing else, is overkill or just doesn't work right.

Also, the EVGA cards are superior to pretty much everybody else, and even if they were not superior due to the XC models being binned, their support absolutely exceeds what anybody else offers. For any Nvidia gaming card it is very hard for me to recommend any other brand unless there is an exceptional deal on a specific model at the time. In this case, I think this is a much better card and there is no other company I know of with the same level of customer support as EVGA.

I'd probably recommend something along these lines, while still trying to mostly stay close to what you had selected. Also, unless you don't currently have a system running Windows 7, 8 or 10, or if you do but you plan to continue using that operating system on that machine, then there is no reason to buy a new Windows 10 license because you can simply move it from the current system to the new one, clean install and all.

If you don't need Windows, this saves you about 140 bucks. If you do need it, then it only saves you about 50 bucks. But I think overall it's a better use of the money and there are a couple of significant changes there for the better, including the Seasonic Prime Gold PSU that is at least somewhat better than that G3, not that the G3 isn't pretty good because it is.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($407.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair - H100i PRO 75 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus - ROG MAXIMUS XI HERO (WI-FI) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($284.70 @ Newegg Business)
Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($105.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($126.63 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Crucial - MX500 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Adorama)
Video Card: EVGA - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card ($779.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair - Crystal 570X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($159.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - PRIME Ultra Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($128.41 @ Amazon)
Total: $2233.66
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-23 02:41 EDT-0400
This is actually more what I'm looking for. I did some searching last night and decided I'd also rather go with a case that has better airflow. And came up with the H100i myself so thats great. I do currently have a 500GB SSD and 1TB HD that I can use in this new computer. I was planning on putting the OS on the M.2 as well as any immediate games I might be playing and use either the 500GB SSD or 1TB HD as backup. Do you think I should still get a 1TB SSD with already having those?

I also agree on the RAM, I'm fine going without the RBG.

As far as the graphics go, I chose that card because it seemed like it can OC better than others and it was an open fan design which I understand to cool better with a front installed radiator.
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
I'm curious, what makes you say that?
I generally build PCs this way that way mainly out of protecting data. If you put all of your data and programs in the same drive, if something goes wrong with your Windows install, or your primary drive gets corrupted, you'll lose all of it. If you have your data on a separate drive, if something goes wrong with your Windows install, you lose just your Windows drive.
 

Irishsullie

Honorable
Nov 7, 2012
47
0
10,530
0
This is actually more what I'm looking for. I did some searching last night and decided I'd also rather go with a case that has better airflow. And came up with the H100i myself so thats great. I do currently have a 500GB SSD and 1TB HD that I can use in this new computer. I was planning on putting the OS on the M.2 as well as any immediate games I might be playing and use either the 500GB SSD or 1TB HD as backup. Do you think I should still get a 1TB SSD with already having those?

I also agree on the RAM, I'm fine going without the RBG.

As far as the graphics go, I chose that card because it seemed like it can OC better than others and it was an open fan design which I understand to cool better with a front installed radiator.
So this is the new build pending the decision on the Storage. Basically do I go for the M.2 500GB and a 1TB SSD, or do I keep the 1TB M.2. I also have a 500GB SSD and 1TB HD available here at home.

PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/7cKsTB

CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($407.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair - H100i PRO 75 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus - ROG MAXIMUS XI HERO (WI-FI) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($284.70 @ Newegg Business)
Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($110.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($269.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB ROG Strix Gaming OC Video Card ($769.99 @ Newegg Business)
Case: Fractal Design - Meshify C Dark TG ATX Mid Tower Case ($94.99 @ Walmart)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - PRIME Ultra Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($128.41 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($99.39 @ OutletPC)
Total: $2266.33
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
So this is the new build pending the decision on the Storage. Basically do I go for the M.2 500GB and a 1TB SSD, or do I keep the 1TB M.2. I also have a 500GB SSD and 1TB HD available here at home.
There's no such thing as too much storage. You can definitely use and reuse all of your available drives, I would say that you should use the 1TB M2 as the secondary storage and then get a smaller 250GB - 500GB drive for the OS. Most Z390 boards can accommodate multiple M2 drives now, just make sure that you plug your other drives into the proper SATA ports.
 
I have BF1, LibreOffice, a few small VMs, and several other popular utilities installed, and my 500 GB 960 EVO is ~60% full...

I'd personally get the 1 TB drive as an OS drive as you planned...(losing whatever else is on it, i.e., apps and/or data in the event of corruption/malware, etc., is not a big deal if you have a good image backup somewhere...!)

In fact, the Intel 2 TB NVME/ M.2 660P is only $225 or so right now....fast/big/relatively inexpensive....a rare combo of these three factors (the 1 TB drive is only $109)
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I'm curious, what makes you say that?
No need to be curious, it's because that is the common recipe. Keeping important data on the same drive and partition as the OS is begging to lose it if you get an infection or Windows becomes corrupted to the point where the OS is neither recoverable nor are the files accessible. Or, if there is just a drive failure, since that is a lot more common on the OS drive that sees far more use than secondary drives.

So there is nothing I can see wrong with that statement he made, although I might have expanded it further and said "unless you have that data ALSO backed up to another location in addition to being on the OS drive". Doesn't really matter what you put there if you have it elsewhere as well, EXCEPT, that we know all drives perform better when they have less of their total capacity in use so keeping installation programs, game files, backups, movies, music, etc., stored elsewhere and not on the OS drive does in fact help to keep that drive speed from bogging down due to a lack of space. After all, the minute you start putting anything on a drive, is the minute it starts slowing down. Generally speaking, of course. For SSD of all flavors this does not apply nearly as much as for a mechanical drive.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
So this is the new build pending the decision on the Storage. Basically do I go for the M.2 500GB and a 1TB SSD, or do I keep the 1TB M.2. I also have a 500GB SSD and 1TB HD available here at home.

Honestly, for a new build I'd buy a new OS drive unless that 500GB SSD you already have is fairly new. I really doubt, unless you install one hell of a lot of large professional applications on your system that you will ever use up that 500GB, especially if you do like most people do and keep your game files or steam folder on a separate drive. It can't HURT to have that 1TB NVME drive, at all, but it's also probably not terribly necessary. If money is no concern then by all means, go for it. Otherwise, I'd just go with the 500GB model and put that extra money elsewhere. These drives already saturate the PCI bus AND unless you are transferring from SSD to SSD, you're not going to realize those speeds anyhow above what the 500GB model can do, or a 250GB model for that matter, so really it's kind of pointless unless you have an all SSD system and do a lot of transferring of files from your OS drive to storage or visa versa.

For actual gaming, there is very little practical advantage to anything past a standard SATA SSD, except when loading the game, or loading maps, levels and textures. The rest of the time, a normal HDD is just as good because fast storage will not affect FPS at all.
 

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