[SOLVED] New AIO install Bubble noises and Pop Sound RMA or Keep ?

Jayant Arora

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Mar 2, 2014
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Hey guys!!

I have got a new AIO Deepcool castle EX 360, using for 5 days now and some unusual/wiered things have happened with it after install, i'm not sure if these things are normal or abnormal for a new AIO unit.
Please guide me if i should get RMA or keep it.

There were two instances of two different sounds:
1. When i 1st installed it [2 days ago] and run my system after 20 mins i heared a loud pop sound from near corner of radiator
it never happened again since then.
2. I use my system 6-8 hours daily some times i'm feeling and hearing vibrations of bubbles moving sounds from pump , that happens once in a day at least
for a very short burst period like 5 Seconds.

I did some digging since my rad is installed vertical position side ways[Lian Li O11 D] with hoses on top side and since air rises up the water, there's a possibility that some air is trapped in rad and it moves around through pump some times quite easily.
I can install rad upside down hoses pointing downwards so that it is always fully filled with water, but then why should i ? it's a new unit it should suppose to work in that or any orientation given are standard case orientations. Also it will look stupid.

I use my system for work, so it's critical that it should be stable and i can't afford to have hiccups in my work due to any failure with my system.
Tell me if these are the signs of a Bad AIO or poor quality controll then i will surely get an RMA.
 
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Jayant Arora

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Ok. Not sure which tube is the head input and which goes back to the rad, nobody ever labels that 🤔, so hopefully the air is now trapped back in the reservoir on the inlet side of the rad and won't then be able to travel through the loop.

It's one of the drawbacks associated with an AIO, on the one hand it's a sealed maintenance free, can't do it wrong thing, but by the same standard, it's maintenance free and sealed so there's no way to evacuate any air in the loop, you can only stick it someplace that doesn't affect the loop.
There's new finding now, sound through the pump is gone, but some wriggling of very short burst still exists,
i observed when i run the system open without side glass cover there's no short bursts or vibration ever and temps are also less at 100% loads by 3-4'C[idle and gaming temps are same].

I have a theory, i observed my AIO pipes are little pressed by side glass of the case when closed and it may be possible that some times when some bubbles went through pipes they vibrate the pipe and then glass vibrates with them.
I'm gonna rotate my CPU block now so pipes wont touch/press by the glass, and if it didn't work then what you suggest i should apply for an RMA i have now 3 days left ?

UPDATE: Issue resolved no issue now, it was the glass indeed, my pipes and my gpu power 8pin pcie cable were pressed against the glass, glass was vibrating with them and gpu was adding it into the vibrations whenever its fans were ramping up and down. Now pipes cables are set properly, using since 3 days now no sound no vibes at all.
 
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Phaaze88

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I can install rad upside down hoses pointing downwards so that it is always fully filled with water, but then why should i ? it's a new unit it should suppose to work in that or any orientation given are standard case orientations. Also it will look stupid.
It can work in any orientation, but with radiators positioned vertically, with tubing entering from below: that has the benefit of the pump pushing the stray air bubbles/pockets into the rad, where they will then rise to the other end and become trapped there.
This means the pump doesn't get exposed to air while running for hours at a time.
It's the same deal with top mounted rads; that one also avoids air getting to the pump, which should stay lubricated at all times.

Ultimately up to you how to position it though.
All you really lose is some pump lifespan, and perhaps some peace of mind when air comes in contact with the pump and gurgles, or whatever.
 

Karadjgne

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With the pc on, slowly tilt the pc until the hose connectors are above the pump. This will allow any trapped air to travel up the hose. Wait a few minutes, the gurgle should stop, then slowly tilt the pc back so that the air stays in the tube. If it's air stuck on the input side of the pump, you might have to do it a few times. A radiator is a giant U shape on the inside, so only the non connector side is single, the reservoir in the connector end is split in 2.
Ideally you want any air to be on the radiator input side so it won't travel down the U and back to the pump.

With tubes down, all the air gets stuck at the top of the rad (bottom of the U).
 

Jayant Arora

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Mar 2, 2014
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With the pc on, slowly tilt the pc until the hose connectors are above the pump. This will allow any trapped air to travel up the hose. Wait a few minutes, the gurgle should stop, then slowly tilt the pc back so that the air stays in the tube. If it's air stuck on the input side of the pump, you might have to do it a few times. A radiator is a giant U shape on the inside, so only the non connector side is single, the reservoir in the connector end is split in 2.
Ideally you want any air to be on the radiator input side so it won't travel down the U and back to the pump.

With tubes down, all the air gets stuck at the top of the rad (bottom of the U).
Ok i did that exactly as u said for 3 minutes[hose connectors above pump] or so and then back to normal position, now let see for a day or two if vibrations gurgles happens again .
 

Karadjgne

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Ambassador
Ok. Not sure which tube is the head input and which goes back to the rad, nobody ever labels that 🤔, so hopefully the air is now trapped back in the reservoir on the inlet side of the rad and won't then be able to travel through the loop.

It's one of the drawbacks associated with an AIO, on the one hand it's a sealed maintenance free, can't do it wrong thing, but by the same standard, it's maintenance free and sealed so there's no way to evacuate any air in the loop, you can only stick it someplace that doesn't affect the loop.
 

Jayant Arora

Honorable
Mar 2, 2014
95
4
10,565
5
Ok. Not sure which tube is the head input and which goes back to the rad, nobody ever labels that 🤔, so hopefully the air is now trapped back in the reservoir on the inlet side of the rad and won't then be able to travel through the loop.

It's one of the drawbacks associated with an AIO, on the one hand it's a sealed maintenance free, can't do it wrong thing, but by the same standard, it's maintenance free and sealed so there's no way to evacuate any air in the loop, you can only stick it someplace that doesn't affect the loop.
There's new finding now, sound through the pump is gone, but some wriggling of very short burst still exists,
i observed when i run the system open without side glass cover there's no short bursts or vibration ever and temps are also less at 100% loads by 3-4'C[idle and gaming temps are same].

I have a theory, i observed my AIO pipes are little pressed by side glass of the case when closed and it may be possible that some times when some bubbles went through pipes they vibrate the pipe and then glass vibrates with them.
I'm gonna rotate my CPU block now so pipes wont touch/press by the glass, and if it didn't work then what you suggest i should apply for an RMA i have now 3 days left ?

UPDATE: Issue resolved no issue now, it was the glass indeed, my pipes and my gpu power 8pin pcie cable were pressed against the glass, glass was vibrating with them and gpu was adding it into the vibrations whenever its fans were ramping up and down. Now pipes cables are set properly, using since 3 days now no sound no vibes at all.
 
Last edited:

Karadjgne

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i observed when i run the system open without side glass cover there's no short bursts or vibration ever and temps are also less at 100% loads by 3-4'C[idle and gaming temps are same].
Nice airflow, many don't see numbers that low, can easily see 10°C or more.
I have a theory, i observed my AIO pipes are little pressed by side glass of the case when closed and it may be possible that some times when some bubbles went through pipes they vibrate the pipe and then glass vibrates with them.
Bingo. Everything moving has a resonant frequency, and humans can only detect that in a certain range, or it's harmonics. Just happens that the pressure of the tubing at that particular flow rate rpm is what's audible. Moving the hoses should alleviate that 'glass acting as a speaker' affect.
 
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Karadjgne

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It's an aio. There isn't an aio made that I've ever heard of that has any 'anti-leak' valving or pressure relief valving. It's a motor that spins, pushing on a diaphragm which forces coolant through microchannels on the baseplate, down a tube into the radiator, through the radiator into another tube going back to the pump. It's a sealed system where expected coolant temps will be in the 30-50°C range, so don't ever come close to boiling points or freezing points with the ethylene glycol based antifreeze type coolant.

It's possible there's a chunk of solder or some other contaminant that made its way through the system and you heard it slam around the reservoir.

Psu? Could be. No telling lol.
 

Jayant Arora

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Mar 2, 2014
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I didn't say they were, but still... that crap can come to bite you in the butt later.

I feel sorry for the people who work in the marketing departments. They basically get paid to lie, or make flashy and convincing ads about things they don't fully understand...
HaHa!! Agree Bro!
but it's the "JOB" - to make it sell ain't it ?
 
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Karadjgne

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Deepcools anti-leak stuff is inside the pump itself. (which are designed and built by deepcool not coolit or asetek afaik). It basically consists of a spring loaded valve like the pressure relief cap on a car radiator but dumps the excess pressure back into the intake. With any other pump, if the pressure gets that high, the impeller just cavitates and flow comes to a halt. It's a gimmick. It's for real, but doesn't affect anything other than playing on the fears of aio owners who hear the word leak and don't know any better.

Anti-leak technology, without really going into any detail, but doesn't do anything for the largest area of possible leakage, the hose connector.

It's like most advertising, aggrandized beyond reality. "I need an intel 9900k and RTX2080ti because everybody says that'll get me more than 500fps in minecraft". And yet totally skip over the fine print lost between the lines being that you'll need something better than your old 24" 1080p 60Hz monitor, and neither Intel nor nvidia will mention that.
 

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