[SOLVED] new budget monitor

pandasmash

Distinguished
Sep 2, 2012
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hi again all
finally after replacing all my parts i found out it was my gpu that was dodgy.
new gpu and my old monitor wont work with hdmi, who knows?!?!?!
so its time for a new monitor. never understood these things.

current set up:-
NZXT Switch 810
windows 10 pro
ryzen 5 3600
msi b450 tomahawk max
patriot viper 2 x 8gb
corsair rm 750
GIGABYTE GTX 1660 super gaming oc 6g
stock cooler with the cpu
wd sn750 NVMe

Various sata HHD’s

i play games like: far cry 5, wolfenstein, bullitstorm, fallout, just cause, lords of fallen, doom

any suggestions on a new monitor?
looking at around the £150 mark. but if an extra few quid makes a massive difference then let me know. as i really dont understand monitors.
will this do the job?
Acer G276HLLbmidx 27 Inch FHD Gaming Monitor
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Size is a matter of preference, not performance. A 23.6" 1080p monitor has the same amount of pixels as a 60" 1080p monitor, it's just the pix size that's different. So there's no performance change out of the gpu by going bigger or smaller. What there is is viewable differences according to your eyes and the distance to the monitor.

At 27"-28", the pixel is slightly larger than 24". So if you view a monitor from too close, you'll see a 'pixelated' result, things look grainy. Like sitting too close to the big screen TV. 24" monitors are good for most whom sit at a desk with the monitor on the desktop. 27" is better when it's either mounted to the wall or shoved to the very back of the desk or the desk is deeper than what's normal. Just like a 60" TV is best viewed when you sit 15' away, a 32" is better at only 6'.

Its the resolution, which is amount of pixels in a square inch, which is important. If you compare looking down at a pixel 800x600 being as round as a mixing bowl, 1080P would be as big as a coffee cup, 1440p a whisky glass and 4k shot glass. So by increasing resolution, 1440p is @ 1.7x as many pixels as 1080p, 4k is 4x as many, far more brutal on gpu workloads, but pixel size goes way down giving a sharper image.

A 24" 1080p monitor is exactly the same as a 27" 1080p except for 1 thing. The amount of glass used to make the screen.

I'd suggest you sit where you normally do, measure the distance from monitor to nose. Then go to a store with monitors and stand in front of a 24" and a 27" at the same distance. See if there's any visual difference to you, or if sitting further away from the monitor changes things.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Size is a matter of preference, not performance. A 23.6" 1080p monitor has the same amount of pixels as a 60" 1080p monitor, it's just the pix size that's different. So there's no performance change out of the gpu by going bigger or smaller. What there is is viewable differences according to your eyes and the distance to the monitor.

At 27"-28", the pixel is slightly larger than 24". So if you view a monitor from too close, you'll see a 'pixelated' result, things look grainy. Like sitting too close to the big screen TV. 24" monitors are good for most whom sit at a desk with the monitor on the desktop. 27" is better when it's either mounted to the wall or shoved to the very back of the desk or the desk is deeper than what's normal. Just like a 60" TV is best viewed when you sit 15' away, a 32" is better at only 6'.

Its the resolution, which is amount of pixels in a square inch, which is important. If you compare looking down at a pixel 800x600 being as round as a mixing bowl, 1080P would be as big as a coffee cup, 1440p a whisky glass and 4k shot glass. So by increasing resolution, 1440p is @ 1.7x as many pixels as 1080p, 4k is 4x as many, far more brutal on gpu workloads, but pixel size goes way down giving a sharper image.

A 24" 1080p monitor is exactly the same as a 27" 1080p except for 1 thing. The amount of glass used to make the screen.

I'd suggest you sit where you normally do, measure the distance from monitor to nose. Then go to a store with monitors and stand in front of a 24" and a 27" at the same distance. See if there's any visual difference to you, or if sitting further away from the monitor changes things.
 

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