Question New Build! Best Price = Best Performance !!!

Tinibigz_1992

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Hello,

I am trying to build a new PC but with so many options it's hard to know what will get the best performance.

I know that going from 8 gigs of ram to 16 will help greatly but compatibility with hardware and software is key.

Price point of this build will be about 1000. No keyboard, mouse, or monitor are needed. I have collected a few builds on PCPartPicker but it's still hard to know what exactly should work best.

Two games I want to play on this PC are: Classic WOW, and Fortnite. I know Fortnite requires much more FPS out of the build so higher end GPU and CPU will be needed.

I really want to invest as much as possible in CPU and GPU and maybe save a little on no second hard drive since I won't need to save much on this PC.

I don't know to much about OC hardware but have done it before. I just don't want to overwork the hardware and FPS lower's over a period of time.

Thank you for the help and support.
 
What currency? £$€ or any other currency?

For the games you want to play, which aren't too demanding, but with your suggestions in mind, I'd go for something like this for a 1080p high hertz monitor 60-144hz (what monitor do you have?)

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor ($279.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI - B450 Gaming Plus ATX AM4 Motherboard ($94.89 @ OutletPC)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($94.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($77.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus - GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB DUAL Video Card ($315.04 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT - H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ B&H)
Total: $1012.68
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-24 15:42 EDT-0400


It will be a solid performer, with maximum CPU grunt, amazing 1080p performance, great 1440p performance in nearly any game, and all that would be needed in a year or two's time would be a new GPU and you would be good to go for another couple of years after that.

There is great value out there right now. You could go Intel too, bit more costly for a similar system (but Intel will be about 5-10% better at pure gaming FPS). This system will last you years with just a simple GPU upgrade in two years to keep gaming at high resolutions with Ultra settings and a very enjoyable gaming experience.

EDIT: OC'ing hardware will not reduce the performance, and neither will the FPS drop over time. OC'ing components 'may' reduce the lifespan, but generally speaking, if the OC is done correctly, and is stable, there will be no reduction in performance/FPS only an increase! :) That's the point of OC'ing, to eek every last piece of free performance from the hardware.
 
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Tinibigz_1992

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Dec 13, 2012
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What currency? £$€ or any other currency?

For the games you want to play, which aren't too demanding, but with your suggestions in mind, I'd go for something like this for a 1080p high hertz monitor 60-144hz (what monitor do you have?)

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor ($279.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI - B450 Gaming Plus ATX AM4 Motherboard ($94.89 @ OutletPC)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($94.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($77.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus - GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB DUAL Video Card ($315.04 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT - H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ B&H)
Total: $1012.68
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-24 15:42 EDT-0400


It will be a solid performer, with maximum CPU grunt, amazing 1080p performance, great 1440p performance in nearly any game, and all that would be needed in a year or two's time would be a new GPU and you would be good to go for another couple of years after that.

There is great value out there right now. You could go Intel too, bit more costly for a similar system (but Intel will be about 5-10% better at pure gaming FPS). This system will last you years with just a simple GPU upgrade in two years to keep gaming at high resolutions with Ultra settings and a very enjoyable gaming experience.

EDIT: OC'ing hardware will not reduce the performance, and neither will the FPS drop over time. OC'ing components 'may' reduce the lifespan, but generally speaking, if the OC is done correctly, and is stable, there will be no reduction in performance/FPS only an increase! :) That's the point of OC'ing, to eek every last piece of free performance from the hardware.
What currency? £$€ or any other currency?

For the games you want to play, which aren't too demanding, but with your suggestions in mind, I'd go for something like this for a 1080p high hertz monitor 60-144hz (what monitor do you have?)

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor ($279.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI - B450 Gaming Plus ATX AM4 Motherboard ($94.89 @ OutletPC)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($94.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($77.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus - GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB DUAL Video Card ($315.04 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT - H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ B&H)
Total: $1012.68
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-24 15:42 EDT-0400


It will be a solid performer, with maximum CPU grunt, amazing 1080p performance, great 1440p performance in nearly any game, and all that would be needed in a year or two's time would be a new GPU and you would be good to go for another couple of years after that.

There is great value out there right now. You could go Intel too, bit more costly for a similar system (but Intel will be about 5-10% better at pure gaming FPS). This system will last you years with just a simple GPU upgrade in two years to keep gaming at high resolutions with Ultra settings and a very enjoyable gaming experience.

EDIT: OC'ing hardware will not reduce the performance, and neither will the FPS drop over time. OC'ing components 'may' reduce the lifespan, but generally speaking, if the OC is done correctly, and is stable, there will be no reduction in performance/FPS only an increase! :) That's the point of OC'ing, to eek every last piece of free performance from the hardware.

Hello Keith,

Thank you for the insight, if I may ask does the AMD work well with Geforce? I often see AMD with Radeon video cards?

My moniter is not 144hz but I will need to upgrade the monitor after the PC is built and this US dollars.

I like the build that you have setup.. I like the 3200 RAM speed and SSD drive plus the case and power supply are great.

I don't get how a motherboard affects the performance of a build? Any chance you might know?

Thank you for your time and support.
 
Hello Keith,

Thank you for the insight, if I may ask does the AMD work well with Geforce? I often see AMD with Radeon video cards?

My moniter is not 144hz but I will need to upgrade the monitor after the PC is built and this US dollars.

I like the build that you have setup.. I like the 3200 RAM speed and SSD drive plus the case and power supply are great.

I don't get how a motherboard affects the performance of a build? Any chance you might know?

Thank you for your time and support.
Yes, AMD works with Nvidia just fine. Nvidia are just more powerful per segment than AMD, so most build would have an Nvidia GPU. AMD gpu's are just as good, and often offer better pricing. But for performance Nvidia cards are better.

Motherboards are for sure, important. They can affect performance a little, but not really that much. It's more about what features each mobo has. RGB, more memory slots, more power phases, better passive cooling among a whole array of different features. Getting a decent mobo is always advisable. You could get a cheaper one but it wouldn't be a good idea.

You're welcome for the help :) Enjoy your new system.
 
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Tinibigz_1992

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I believe it is Monday.
Thank you for that insight, I will wait for that info to come out. I still need to figure out so much more then just price. I often don't know what the difference in perfromance to price would be in two different CPU options, which would you choose:

https://www.amazon.com/Intel-i7-9700K-Desktop-Processor-Unlocked/dp/B07HHN6KBZ?tag=hawk-future-20&ascsubtag=tomshardware-thaus:en_US_18_Review_3986-20

https://www.newegg.com/amd-ryzen-7-2700x/p/N82E16819113499?item=N82E16819113499&ignorebbr=1&source=region&nm_mc=knc-googleadwords-pc&cm_mmc=knc-googleadwords-pc-_-pla-_-processors+-+desktops-_-N82E16819113499&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIwMK09N284gIVgR-tBh3VNALpEAQYASABEgKCfvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

I do get that one runs at 4.9 OC but I won't OC any parts for now, but it would be nice to have the option in the future if needed.

So both run around 3.6 - 3.7 but would performance verry in these chips?
 

Tinibigz_1992

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Yes, AMD works with Nvidia just fine. Nvidia are just more powerful per segment than AMD, so most build would have an Nvidia GPU. AMD gpu's are just as good, and often offer better pricing. But for performance Nvidia cards are better.

Motherboards are for sure, important. They can affect performance a little, but not really that much. It's more about what features each mobo has. RGB, more memory slots, more power phases, better passive cooling among a whole array of different features. Getting a decent mobo is always advisable. You could get a cheaper one but it wouldn't be a good idea.

You're welcome for the help :) Enjoy your new system.
Well I still have a few questions if possible, out of these two chips which run at 3.6 - 3.7 core speed, would performance very?

https://www.newegg.com/amd-ryzen-7-2700x/p/N82E16819113499?item=N82E16819113499&ignorebbr=1&source=region&nm_mc=knc-googleadwords-pc&cm_mmc=knc-googleadwords-pc-_-pla-_-processors+-+desktops-_-N82E16819113499&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIwMK09N284gIVgR-tBh3VNALpEAQYASABEgKCfvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

https://www.amazon.com/Intel-i7-9700K-Desktop-Processor-Unlocked/dp/B07HHN6KBZ?tag=hawk-future-20&ascsubtag=tomshardware-thaus:en_US_18_Review_3986-20

If I don't OC any CPU, I just want to run it out the box speed.

Thank you
 
Out of those two CPU's at 1080p high hertz gaming, the Intel will push more FPS. Once you go above that res (1440p up) then they are much more equal. This is purely from a gaming point of view. At 1440p both CPU's will perfrom very closely. In some multitasking scenarios the 2700x will win out with more cores/threads.
 

Tinibigz_1992

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Out of those two CPU's at 1080p high hertz gaming, the Intel will push more FPS. Once you go above that res (1440p up) then they are much more equal. This is purely from a gaming point of view. At 1440p both CPU's will perfrom very closely. In some multitasking scenarios the 2700x will win out with more cores/threads.
Hello Keith,

You are extramely helpful, if you may help me with the GPU choice as well:

https://www.newegg.com/msi-geforce-rtx-2060-rtx-2060-gaming-z-6g/p/N82E16814137379?cm_sp=SearchSuccess-_-INFOCARD-_-rtx+206-_-14-137-379-_-1&Description=rtx+206

https://www.amazon.com/MSI-GeForce-GTX-1660-Ti/dp/B07N824KNV/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=1660+ti&qid=1559074934&s=electronics&sr=1-2

this 80 dollar difference would affect 25 FPS? I don't mind spending a little extra to get a PC that will last longer and would need less upgrades, plus the performance of 50 FPS would outweigh 100 bucks.

What do you think of this CPU:

https://www.amazon.com/Intel-i9-9900K-Desktop-Processor-Unlocked/dp/B005404P9I/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=9900k&qid=1559075072&s=electronics&sr=1-3

Intel just announced there 10th gen do you think this chip will be cheaper in the next month or so? Before the 27th of August.

I can't seem to find a motherboard that would work best, if you could link me one that be great. I want a board that can support all the speed from the CPU and GPU.

Thank you greatly once again for all the help and support.

TInibigz
 
Hello Keith,

You are extramely helpful, if you may help me with the GPU choice as well:

https://www.newegg.com/msi-geforce-rtx-2060-rtx-2060-gaming-z-6g/p/N82E16814137379?cm_sp=SearchSuccess-_-INFOCARD-_-rtx+206-_-14-137-379-_-1&Description=rtx+206

https://www.amazon.com/MSI-GeForce-GTX-1660-Ti/dp/B07N824KNV/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=1660+ti&qid=1559074934&s=electronics&sr=1-2

this 80 dollar difference would affect 25 FPS? I don't mind spending a little extra to get a PC that will last longer and would need less upgrades, plus the performance of 50 FPS would outweigh 100 bucks.

What do you think of this CPU:

https://www.amazon.com/Intel-i9-9900K-Desktop-Processor-Unlocked/dp/B005404P9I/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=9900k&qid=1559075072&s=electronics&sr=1-3

Intel just announced there 10th gen do you think this chip will be cheaper in the next month or so? Before the 27th of August.

I can't seem to find a motherboard that would work best, if you could link me one that be great. I want a board that can support all the speed from the CPU and GPU.

Thank you greatly once again for all the help and support.

TInibigz
For the GPU's, I would go for the RTX2060, it will give you more FPS, and some new features the GTX will not give. Whether it's worth the 80 bucks for you, is really down to your own opinion. The increase in cost (approx 30%) matched closely with increase in performance (approx 20-25%). If you're prepared to pay it, then it could be worth it to you, asides from the cost.

The I9 9900k is possibly the best pure gaming CPU out there right now. But to build a system around it with a Z390 is gonna work out expensive, plus it needs really good cooling.

Forget about 10th Gen a the mo. I don't even like they call it 10th Gen. It's very misleading. Firstly they will only be available in mobile form, so for laptops etc. So wont' be use for a power gaming desktop.

I can help you choose a motherboard, but you have to decide which architecture you are going for : AMD or Intel.

The build I've outlined above is perfect for your needs, and will get most out of your CPU/GPU and a great gaming experience. If you want an I9 9900k your build will be much higher cost.


What is your max budget? What to do you want to do with the system? What kind of monitor do you intend playing on when you get a new one? (res/hz etc)?
 
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Tinibigz_1992

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For the GPU's, I would go for the RTX2060, it will give you more FPS, and some new features the GTX will not give. Whether it's worth the 80 bucks for you, is really down to your own opinion. The increase in cost (approx 30%) matched closely with increase in performance (approx 20-25%). If you're prepared to pay it, then it could be worth it to you, asides from the cost.

The I9 9900k is possibly the best pure gaming CPU out there right now. But to build a system around it with a Z390 is gonna work out expensive, plus it needs really good cooling.

Forget about 10th Gen a the mo. I don't even like they call it 10th Gen. It's very misleading. Firstly they will only be available in mobile form, so for laptops etc. So wont' be use for a power gaming desktop.

I can help you choose a motherboard, but you have to decide which architecture you are going for : AMD or Intel.

The build I've outlined above is perfect for your needs, and will get most out of your CPU/GPU and a great gaming experience. If you want an I9 9900k your build will be much higher cost.


What is your max budget? What to do you want to do with the system? What kind of monitor do you intend playing on when you get a new one? (res/hz etc)?
Hello Keith,

I will play fortnite which will require much better hardware then WOW.

The reason I bring into play the I9 is due to the price difference. I get the AMD you used above is great and 200 dollars cheaper but I would rather spend a little more to know that my FPS will not go down when a new title comes out. Plus I won't need a upgrade in 2-3 years.

I know I stated 1000k US for this PC but after looking around a 1k PC get's you a decent PC that will need upgrades in 2 years. If I spend a extra 500 I feel I can use some OC later down the road if needed to get some FPS if the FPS goes down due to new titles. I don't want to OC the I9 right away so will need extra cooling for that? Even out the box this CPU would require more cooling?

I also feel if I go with the newer GPU 2060 then a newer CPU will not bottleneck the build? That's why I asked about motherboards because I don't mind spending a little more to get those 3 peaces to work really well.

The powersupply, 860 EVO (I heard Samsung released a newer or faster version? I don't know how true this is?).
For the GPU's, I would go for the RTX2060, it will give you more FPS, and some new features the GTX will not give. Whether it's worth the 80 bucks for you, is really down to your own opinion. The increase in cost (approx 30%) matched closely with increase in performance (approx 20-25%). If you're prepared to pay it, then it could be worth it to you, asides from the cost.

The I9 9900k is possibly the best pure gaming CPU out there right now. But to build a system around it with a Z390 is gonna work out expensive, plus it needs really good cooling.

Forget about 10th Gen a the mo. I don't even like they call it 10th Gen. It's very misleading. Firstly they will only be available in mobile form, so for laptops etc. So wont' be use for a power gaming desktop.

I can help you choose a motherboard, but you have to decide which architecture you are going for : AMD or Intel.

The build I've outlined above is perfect for your needs, and will get most out of your CPU/GPU and a great gaming experience. If you want an I9 9900k your build will be much higher cost.


What is your max budget? What to do you want to do with the system? What kind of monitor do you intend playing on when you get a new one? (res/hz etc)?
Hello Keith,

Thank you greatly for the reply again, but I will play Fortnite and I will try my best to run it at 244 to be honest. Much of gaming now is hardware, and without the 244hz I won't be able to compare to some other players. Not saying I am the best player but mentally I hate the feeling of being at a disadvantage. I would love to have a PC that regardless of what setting I choose it can provide the outcome I ask. Resolution is important but with his hardware should not all Res work for me?

I just feel if I am going to spend 1000 dollars, I might as well just spend a little more even if it's 500 more to get everything I truly want.

This is why I am looking to some higher end hardware. So instead of 1000k, let's shot for 1500.

I like the tower you choose, The NZXT is my choice plus the SSD drive, I heard Samsung has a SSD that is really fast is that the one you selected? I like 16 GB of Ram but Patroit just lowered their price (what do you think of this RAM):

https://www.amazon.com/Patriot-Viper-3200MHz-Performance-Memory/dp/B07N3TXFFX?tag=hawk-future-20&ascsubtag=tomshardware-thaus:en_US_18_Review_6140-20

The power supply you choose I will pick as well. Seems like the motherboard is the one thing I don't really know. I will go with Intel and I only choose Intel because I personally feel more comfortable. I hear the only difference between the two is how the data is transferred. AMD moves data from one room to another with large boxes and Intel moves data from one room to another in little boxes? I don't know how true it is that the cores work more efficient for Intel, I have read some things that state the Intel chip cores work 20 percent better? This is hard for me to believe because people show benchmarks that show similar performance. That's why I want the GPU, CPU, and Motherboard to be really powerful and to support one another as much as possible. I don't want the CPU to hinder my GPU or my motherboard to hurt both of them.

How would I know that I will get the best performance from the hardware as far as compatibility works? How do people know this hardware peace will work best with another? I know people try stuff over and over but it's just strange to me that the same hardware in one PC and the same hardware in another PC would get different results.

Thank you for all the info, you have been extremely helpful.
 
Hey there,

Well, I don't know where to start :) Firstly, thank you for the long and detailed reply. BUT, you have some misunderstanding about some things related to PC builds, and Hardware compatibility. Also, some misunderstandings on how some things work. I don't mean to be disrespectful when I say that. So my apologies if it seems like I'm criticising. I'm not.

Ill try and explain in more detail.

So, on the CPU's

Both the AMD 2700x and I7 9700k/I9 9900k are the top performers from each chip maker. You WILL NOT need to replace those CPU's in two years. They will be solid gaming CPU's for quite a long time. You do not have to worry about them. Intel CPU's are typically 10-15% faster than the fastest AMD CPU's. But this might help explain the difference. If you are gaming on Intel chip A, and it goes at 100 fps/hz, and the AMD chip B goes at 90 fps/hz, will you see the difference? The answer is no. The point I'm trying to make is that both CPU's are excellent gaming CPU's and are the envy of most PC owners. Either chip will do you well. Just to be clear: You will not need to replace either CPU in 2 years, and both will give you amazing performance.

On the GPU's

Both of your CPU's will drive any high end card, perfectly well! Would you believe the RTX2060 is a mid-range card :) But if you chose the most powerful GPU out there (RTX2080ti), both of the CPU's would work perfectly with it. There would be NO bottleneck at all. It's not worth thinking about. That obviously means no bottleneck with an RTX2060 either :)

On the SSD

Yes, there are faster SSD's than the 860 Evo. There are newer versions with faster read/write speeds. Evo 970/Pro/Evo Plus. These are faster SSD's but more expensive.
Not only Samsung Evo's. Their are other top level SSD's too! There are lots of choices. But, again, you will not notice the difference between an 860 Evo and a 970 Evo. The only way to tell which is faster is by testing it with software that tells you how fast they are (Benchmarks). In realworld use, you or I or anyone else could tell the difference. They are both ultra quick, so quick we cannot tell the difference with our eye. Only with a benchmark.

On the RAM

The Patriots you linked are nice. The one you quotes is in UK pounds and would costs about 300 dollars or close. 32gbs of ram for a gaming machine is not needed. 16gbs of ram is perfect for a gaming machine. Most games will not use more than 10gbs of system ram when gaming. You do not need 32gbs.

On the Motherboard

Most motherboards actually perform very closely to each other. Even the mid-range ones that cost about $100 are 97% as good as the $200 motherboards. The main difference between the two is the features they offer. The $200 mobo will have much more features and options that the $100 board. But the performance in games will be mostly the same. DOn't be overly concerned about which mobo. Just make sure to choose the right one for whatever CPU you choose.

For an I9 9900k you need a high end motherboard. For Intel they cost a bomb. For 1500 you will not get a system with an I9/Z390/32gb Ram/RTX2060 for anywhere close to that.

However, I'm happy to give another post with two systems for $1500. One will be AMD based, the other Intel. Let me know if you would like me to do that.

With everything I've said, I would still advice you to get a system like the one I've mentioned above in my first posts.

It will do everything you want, and you will not be disappointed. You will not be at a disadvantage from anyone else, and your system will perform well for years to come. The only thing you might need to do, is upgrade your GPU in 2-3 years and that's about it!

Just a final note on monitors. Most monitors go up to 144hz. Even an RTX2080ti and an I9 9900k will not hit 244hz. In some games that combination will not hit 144hz. You should be aiming for a decent 1080p/1440p 144hz monitor at most. Forget about 244hz. There are some old games where ou can hit mad FPS/hz. Like CS:GO where you could be hitting 300FPS easily. But you could also hit 200FPS with the system above.

You really just need to be 100% clear on what you want your system to do and achieve. Sometimes this is game dependant. For example, as I said CS:GO you will hit 300fps. With the same hardware in BF5 you might only be hitting 120fps. The task you want to do is important too.
 
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Tinibigz_1992

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Hey there,

Well, I don't know where to start :) Firstly, thank you for the long and detailed reply. BUT, you have some misunderstanding about some things related to PC builds, and Hardware compatibility. Also, some misunderstandings on how some things work. I don't mean to be disrespectful when I say that. So my apologies if it seems like I'm criticising. I'm not.

Ill try and explain in more detail.

So, on the CPU's

Both the AMD 2700x and I7 9700k/I9 9900k are the top performers from each chip maker. You WILL NOT need to replace those CPU's in two years. They will be solid gaming CPU's for quite a long time. You do not have to worry about them. Intel CPU's are typically 10-15% faster than the fastest AMD CPU's. But this might help explain the difference. If you are gaming on Intel chip A, and it goes at 100 fps/hz, and the AMD chip B goes at 90 fps/hz, will you see the difference? The answer is no. The point I'm trying to make is that both CPU's are excellent gaming CPU's and are the envy of most PC owners. Either chip will do you well. Just to be clear: You will not need to replace either CPU in 2 years, and both will give you amazing performance.

On the GPU's

Both of your CPU's will drive any high end card, perfectly well! Would you believe the RTX2060 is a mid-range card :) But if you chose the most powerful GPU out there (RTX2080ti), both of the CPU's would work perfectly with it. There would be NO bottleneck at all. It's not worth thinking about. That obviously means no bottleneck with an RTX2060 either :)

On the SSD

Yes, there are faster SSD's than the 860 Evo. There are newer versions with faster read/write speeds. Evo 970/Pro/Evo Plus. These are faster SSD's but more expensive.
Not only Samsung Evo's. Their are other top level SSD's too! There are lots of choices. But, again, you will not notice the difference between an 860 Evo and a 970 Evo. The only way to tell which is faster is by testing it with software that tells you how fast they are (Benchmarks). In realworld use, you or I or anyone else could tell the difference. They are both ultra quick, so quick we cannot tell the difference with our eye. Only with a benchmark.

On the RAM

The Patriots you linked are nice. The one you quotes is in UK pounds and would costs about 300 dollars or close. 32gbs of ram for a gaming machine is not needed. 16gbs of ram is perfect for a gaming machine. Most games will not use more than 10gbs of system ram when gaming. You do not need 32gbs.

On the Motherboard

Most motherboards actually perform very closely to each other. Even the mid-range ones that cost about $100 are 97% as good as the $200 motherboards. The main difference between the two is the features they offer. The $200 mobo will have much more features and options that the $100 board. But the performance in games will be mostly the same. DOn't be overly concerned about which mobo. Just make sure to choose the right one for whatever CPU you choose.

For an I9 9900k you need a high end motherboard. For Intel they cost a bomb. For 1500 you will not get a system with an I9/Z390/32gb Ram/RTX2060 for anywhere close to that.

However, I'm happy to give another post with two systems for $1500. One will be AMD based, the other Intel. Let me know if you would like me to do that.

With everything I've said, I would still advice you to get a system like the one I've mentioned above in my first posts.

It will do everything you want, and you will not be disappointed. You will not be at a disadvantage from anyone else, and your system will perform well for years to come. The only thing you might need to do, is upgrade your GPU in 2-3 years and that's about it!
Hello Keith,

I would love a 1500 dollar build on both AMD and Intel.

I get what your saying, I am overthinking the small differences between things that won't even affect something I see. Your not disrespectful at all, your clear in explaining exactly what I am lacking and teaching me more then my college professors ever have. I am more grateful then offend, knowledge is power and I appricate you sharing yours.

So putting more into the CPU, GPU, and motherboard won't really help me as much as I would like, so I should save myself some money and in 2-3 years upgrade my GPU. I like your thoughts the tech changes so much even if I get the best it's only the best for 6 months. :(

If I may ask you this, if you wanted a PC today and you are going to build it what would that be? If you could post me that build that would be great.

Thank you so much again, and don't ever be afraid to express yourself. We can't learn without truth. :)
 

Tinibigz_1992

Honorable
Dec 13, 2012
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Hey there,

Well, I don't know where to start :) Firstly, thank you for the long and detailed reply. BUT, you have some misunderstanding about some things related to PC builds, and Hardware compatibility. Also, some misunderstandings on how some things work. I don't mean to be disrespectful when I say that. So my apologies if it seems like I'm criticising. I'm not.

Ill try and explain in more detail.

So, on the CPU's

Both the AMD 2700x and I7 9700k/I9 9900k are the top performers from each chip maker. You WILL NOT need to replace those CPU's in two years. They will be solid gaming CPU's for quite a long time. You do not have to worry about them. Intel CPU's are typically 10-15% faster than the fastest AMD CPU's. But this might help explain the difference. If you are gaming on Intel chip A, and it goes at 100 fps/hz, and the AMD chip B goes at 90 fps/hz, will you see the difference? The answer is no. The point I'm trying to make is that both CPU's are excellent gaming CPU's and are the envy of most PC owners. Either chip will do you well. Just to be clear: You will not need to replace either CPU in 2 years, and both will give you amazing performance.

On the GPU's

Both of your CPU's will drive any high end card, perfectly well! Would you believe the RTX2060 is a mid-range card :) But if you chose the most powerful GPU out there (RTX2080ti), both of the CPU's would work perfectly with it. There would be NO bottleneck at all. It's not worth thinking about. That obviously means no bottleneck with an RTX2060 either :)

On the SSD

Yes, there are faster SSD's than the 860 Evo. There are newer versions with faster read/write speeds. Evo 970/Pro/Evo Plus. These are faster SSD's but more expensive.
Not only Samsung Evo's. Their are other top level SSD's too! There are lots of choices. But, again, you will not notice the difference between an 860 Evo and a 970 Evo. The only way to tell which is faster is by testing it with software that tells you how fast they are (Benchmarks). In realworld use, you or I or anyone else could tell the difference. They are both ultra quick, so quick we cannot tell the difference with our eye. Only with a benchmark.

On the RAM

The Patriots you linked are nice. The one you quotes is in UK pounds and would costs about 300 dollars or close. 32gbs of ram for a gaming machine is not needed. 16gbs of ram is perfect for a gaming machine. Most games will not use more than 10gbs of system ram when gaming. You do not need 32gbs.

On the Motherboard

Most motherboards actually perform very closely to each other. Even the mid-range ones that cost about $100 are 97% as good as the $200 motherboards. The main difference between the two is the features they offer. The $200 mobo will have much more features and options that the $100 board. But the performance in games will be mostly the same. DOn't be overly concerned about which mobo. Just make sure to choose the right one for whatever CPU you choose.

For an I9 9900k you need a high end motherboard. For Intel they cost a bomb. For 1500 you will not get a system with an I9/Z390/32gb Ram/RTX2060 for anywhere close to that.

However, I'm happy to give another post with two systems for $1500. One will be AMD based, the other Intel. Let me know if you would like me to do that.

With everything I've said, I would still advice you to get a system like the one I've mentioned above in my first posts.

It will do everything you want, and you will not be disappointed. You will not be at a disadvantage from anyone else, and your system will perform well for years to come. The only thing you might need to do, is upgrade your GPU in 2-3 years and that's about it!

Just a final note on monitors. Most monitors go up to 144hz. Even an RTX2080ti and an I9 9900k will not hit 244hz. In some games that combination will not hit 144hz. You should be aiming for a decent 1080p/1440p 144hz monitor at most. Forget about 244hz. There are some old games where ou can hit mad FPS/hz. Like CS:GO where you could be hitting 300FPS easily. But you could also hit 200FPS with the system above.

You really just need to be 100% clear on what you want your system to do and achieve. Sometimes this is game dependant. For example, as I said CS:GO you will hit 300fps. With the same hardware in BF5 you might only be hitting 120fps. The task you want to do is important too.
Hello Keith,

I will shoot for the 144hz, I would like to play Fortnite at 144hz. I guess the big goal in hand. G-Sync is offered by Nvidia could this be a option?

Thank you for all the help, I replied to this but I think you just edited this post and added to it. :)
 
Last edited:
AMD - $1600 Build

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor ($279.79 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: ASRock - X470 Taichi ATX AM4 Motherboard ($189.89 @ OutletPC)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($149.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Hitachi - Ultrastar 7K3000 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($46.95 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB STRIX GAMING OC Video Card ($519.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT - H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($104.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1541.38
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-30 05:40 EDT-0400


Intel - $1600 Build

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($399.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - MasterLiquid ML240L RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($69.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: ASRock - Z390 Phantom Gaming 4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($110.71 @ OutletPC)
Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($116.48 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($149.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Hitachi - Ultrastar 7K3000 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($46.95 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB STRIX GAMING OC Video Card ($519.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT - H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($104.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1588.78
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-30 05:44 EDT-0400


For the intel build, has to drop to 16b of ram to keep the costs a little lower. Intel system costs more to build. AMD offer 90& of the performance, but with more bang for the buck.

Both builds use top CPU/Mobo's, Solid PSU/SSD/HDD etc. Plus they have the RTX2070 which is a beast of a GPU for 1080p/144hz - 1440p 60hz

Edit: I just couldn't fit the extra things I wanted under 1500, that why I notched it to 160 instead :)
 

Tinibigz_1992

Honorable
Dec 13, 2012
60
3
10,535
0
AMD - $1600 Build

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor ($279.79 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: ASRock - X470 Taichi ATX AM4 Motherboard ($189.89 @ OutletPC)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($149.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Hitachi - Ultrastar 7K3000 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($46.95 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB STRIX GAMING OC Video Card ($519.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT - H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($104.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1541.38
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-30 05:40 EDT-0400


Intel - $1600 Build

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($399.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - MasterLiquid ML240L RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($69.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: ASRock - Z390 Phantom Gaming 4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($110.71 @ OutletPC)
Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($116.48 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($149.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Hitachi - Ultrastar 7K3000 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($46.95 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB STRIX GAMING OC Video Card ($519.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT - H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($104.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1588.78
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-30 05:44 EDT-0400


For the intel build, has to drop to 16b of ram to keep the costs a little lower. Intel system costs more to build. AMD offer 90& of the performance, but with more bang for the buck.

Both builds use top CPU/Mobo's, Solid PSU/SSD/HDD etc. Plus they have the RTX2070 which is a beast of a GPU for 1080p/144hz - 1440p 60hz

Edit: I just couldn't fit the extra things I wanted under 1500, that why I notched it to 160 instead :)
Hello Keith,

I like the 1600 either way I go they are really really really nice PC's. The things that I have a question about now is the new line of Ryzen 9 processors, I see they release on 7/7 but the big thing on this is the mobo. From what I get in this change is that the new AMD mobo will have PCIe 4.0. From what I understand even less is that PCIe 3.0 has been around since 2010. Since this is a such a big up in one feature is it worth waiting till the Ryzen 9 is out with that mobo combination? The 2070 is even better and I agree with the Asus choices. I see Asus and MSI are the choice most tech people want to get due to support?

I also wonder why the mobo on the AMD build is so much higher in price then the intel? I believe you had to save some money to make the 1600 price.

If I built either of these PC it would last for 5-7 years? I also wonder about freesync or g-sync. I know that if I get a nvidia card it will be g-sync but does that only work with my video card? Does having a AMD chip affect the sync compatibility? Can I have a AMD CPU but a Nvidia GPU and use G-Sync? If so does the 1ms on a monitor matter? Would this monitor be a good choice:

https://www.amazon.com/Acer-XFA240-bmjdpr-Response-Technology/dp/B06ZYHZ6R6/ref=sr_1_10?crid=YC3IW1TD1UAG&keywords=g-sync+monitor&qid=1559238589&s=electronics&sprefix=g-sy,electronics,175&sr=1-10

Thank you for all the help once again.
 

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