Question New build in a Corsair 1000D case ?

UGA2012

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I have a build Im going to do and just acquired a Corsair 1000D for 250 bucks used, but in great condition. The owner never did a watercooling pc and just used an AIO. I have a 5950x and a ASRock 6900xt (no waterblock made for it yet) and want to watercool this PC build. I want to know is it worth it? Temp-wise is the cost worth the additional 1100 bucks?
 
If it was my pc I cannot rationally justify spending $1100 on cooler parts that are likely to make a small difference to performance. I can understand doing it as an enthusiast just because I wanted the best and enjoy the build/challenge. Ultimately what is worth it is going to be personal choice.
 

Zerk2012

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I have a build Im going to do and just acquired a Corsair 1000D for 250 bucks used, but in great condition. The owner never did a watercooling pc and just used an AIO. I have a 5950x and a ASRock 6900xt (no waterblock made for it yet) and want to watercool this PC build. I want to know is it worth it? Temp-wise is the cost worth the additional 1100 bucks?
To me no way is it worth the trouble to install plus the maintenance. Then their no water block for the card.

You can get a 360mm AIO for the CPU and some new case fans in the 200 buck area.
 

Phaaze88

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I want to know is it worth it?
Only you can answer this one after doing it yourself. There isn't a unanimous answer for this. It's a personal thing.

Temp-wise is the cost worth the additional 1100 bucks?
Custom liquid is a hobby and should be treated as such. If you pursue it for performance alone, prepare for disappointment.
Those that have jumped on board that boat and stayed have done so, because they end up enjoying it... just like my aquarium hobby of ~14 years, and still going.
Cost and performance are secondary - perhaps even irrelevant, to some.

The 3 most common things regarding custom liquid that turn away those that take an interest in it are:
Maintenance. Can't 'set-it-and-forget-it' and dust it out ever so often like you can with air and AIO/CLC. It's a bit more involved than those 2.
There's flushing the loop and leak testing, and some of the more showcase pastel coolants - if the user chooses to use those - can clog the loop up real quick, so maintenance needs to be done more frequently.
If the users uses distilled water instead of premixed coolant, they'll need to remember to use a biocide or killcoil.

Cost. Pretty self explanatory.

Research/planning - not doing enough of it, and running into problems(usually compatibility related, sometimes leaks are involved), making it even more costly than originally planned.
Lots of research and taking notes involved, which some people don't have the patience for; they want to get in and get started right now - that's a quick and easy way to get screwed...


I'm not trying to talk you out of taking an interest in custom liquid, but if you're considering pursuing this just for performance(which is a common goal of those that do take interest), don't.
 

UGA2012

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If it was my pc I cannot rationally justify spending $1100 on cooler parts that are likely to make a small difference to performance. I can understand doing it as an enthusiast just because I wanted the best and enjoy the build/challenge. Ultimately what is worth it is going to be personal choice.
I enjoy the challenge, but I want a low noise system.
 

UGA2012

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To me no way is it worth the trouble to install plus the maintenance. Then their no water block for the card.

You can get a 360mm AIO for the CPU and some new case fans in the 200 buck area.
I can use corsair 6900xt block with 2 simple modifications to the block and remove the metal shroud to work.
 

UGA2012

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Only you can answer this one after doing it yourself. There isn't a unanimous answer for this. It's a personal thing.


Custom liquid is a hobby and should be treated as such. If you pursue it for performance alone, prepare for disappointment.
Those that have jumped on board that boat and stayed have done so, because they end up enjoying it... just like my aquarium hobby of ~14 years, and still going.
Cost and performance are secondary - perhaps even irrelevant, to some.

The 3 most common things regarding custom liquid that turn away those that take an interest in it are:
Maintenance. Can't 'set-it-and-forget-it' and dust it out ever so often like you can with air and AIO/CLC. It's a bit more involved than those 2.
There's flushing the loop and leak testing, and some of the more showcase pastel coolants - if the user chooses to use those - can clog the loop up real quick, so maintenance needs to be done more frequently.
If the users uses distilled water instead of premixed coolant, they'll need to remember to use a biocide or killcoil.

Cost. Pretty self explanatory.

Research/planning - not doing enough of it, and running into problems(usually compatibility related, sometimes leaks are involved), making it even more costly than originally planned.
Lots of research and taking notes involved, which some people don't have the patience for; they want to get in and get started right now - that's a quick and easy way to get screwed...


I'm not trying to talk you out of taking an interest in custom liquid, but if you're considering pursuing this just for performance(which is a common goal of those that do take interest), don't.
I really enjoy the aquarium hobby also. Before moving to where I'm at now, I had a 200 gallon saltwater tank for years and it was beautiful and easy to maintain.

I heard that pastel colors can clogg up the system. I will not be using pastel colors if I did do a loop. I also know nor to mix metals and to use copper rads and nickle fittings. Use no cheap parts and to do regular maintenance atleast once a year. I have researched everything that is involved in custom loops.
 

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