Question New build, need advice

Sundau

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Nov 7, 2016
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So far the build has/will have:
Silverstone Raven rvo5b case
Asus x470 pro mobo
Asus rtx2080 dual
4x8GB 3200 g.skill trident z
intel 660p 1tb m.2 (along with a 3tb 7200rpm drive, a 1tb 5400rpm drive, and a 520gb 2.5 sata ssd)
Ryzen 5 3600x
Stock prism cooler
Corsair Rm750 psu
Have but not installed Noctua nh-u12a
Looking to get a ryzen 9 5900x

Peripherals include:
2x samsung 27" curved 1080p monitors
Lg ultragear 27" 1440p
Goxlr -> shure sm7b
Stream deck
Vmoda m200 headphones
Razer destiny 2 edition ornata/death adder elite chroma on both
Walmart speakers ran through the goxlr with own power source
Occasionally I have a controller plugged in

My question is whether the noctua will be able to adequately cool the 5900x during a render or extending gaming session and with the aid of the case design, which rotates the mobo 90° so the I/o is facing upward and 2 180 fans pushing heat up, and which thermal paste I should go with, the noctua is currently not installed but came with it's paste smeared inside the box rather than on the cooler. I was considering using a graphene paste but that's out of my knowledge range which is why I came here. A secondary question is whether my psu will keep up, I can upgrade if need be. I put budget as non applicable because most of my parts are already purchased and I only need the processor (trying to find non gouged stock, otherwise have the money for it) and paste at this point. Any suggestions, comments, and ideas are welcome!
 

Vyrvelata

Notable
According to Noctua - YES, should be fine
Personal opinion - YES, should be fine

But don't have such build around me....
Furthermore 5900x its not that demanding in terms of thermals, recently had some troubles with a couple 10900KF but not with 5900X

PSU Should also be fine....

How old is the Cooler and the Graphene Paste?
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
This depends very much on whether or not you intend to run it with Precision boost overdrive enabled or not.

If not, then yes, just barely, it should be capable enough for the thermal envelope of the 5900x.

If you plan to run Overdrive, and that generally comes enabled by default for MOST motherboards, then you will need a better cooler because that U12A does NOT perform up to the level of the bigger twin finstack coolers no matter what anybody might say to the contrary. We've seen a handful of pretty capable users who've tried this cooler out and did not see the kind of results they saw with the larger coolers when running the U12A with most of the higher TDP CPUs. And just for general information, reviews have seen the 5900x pull more power than the 5950x.

The 5900X draws more power than the 5950X because the 12-core chip runs at higher clock speeds and therefore uses more of its 142W PPT allocation.
Keep in mind that much like Intel does not include ACTUAL thermal design power numbers that include boosted conditions, AMD does not factor in Overdrive performance numbers when stating TDP for their processors. So that "105w" number is practically meaningless if you are running Overdrive, which as we know is literally an automatically configured overclock and is much more taxing than with the non Overdrive configuration. Plus, these Ryzen CPUs have VERY cyclic behavior, and even on lesser models there has been a lot of benefit to adding even a moderately effective aftermarket cooler compared to any of the stock coolers, which doesn't directly pertain to the use of the U12A but it makes clear the fact that these CPUs benefit from cooling performance beyond what might be expected to be necessary going strictly off paper specs.

I would say if you have that cooler already, use it, and if you find it doesn't keep up well enough, upgrade. If it works ok for how YOU have things configured and is able to safely keep things within the margins, then fine, stick with it. Much will depend on YOUR use case and what kind of ambient temperature the system is being run in anyhow.

The change to the 5900x should not make a significant enough difference in overall power consumption to really be a factor in regard to the power supply's capability. Should be fine with what you have UNLESS it is a relatively old unit that has been around the block too many times.
 
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Sundau

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This depends very much on whether or not you intend to run it with Precision boost overdrive enabled or not.

If not, then yes, just barely, it should be capable enough for the thermal envelope of the 5900x.

If you plan to run Overdrive, and that generally comes enabled by default for MOST motherboards, then you will need a better cooler because that U12A does NOT perform up to the level of the bigger twin finstack coolers no matter what anybody might say to the contrary. We've seen a handful of pretty capable users who've tried this cooler out and did not see the kind of results they saw with the larger coolers when running the U12A with most of the higher TDP CPUs. And just for general information, reviews have seen the 5900x pull more power than the 5950x.



Keep in mind that much like Intel does not include ACTUAL thermal design power numbers that include boosted conditions, AMD does not factor in Overdrive performance numbers when stating TDP for their processors. So that "105w" number is practically meaningless if you are running Overdrive, which as we know is literally an automatically configured overclock and is much more taxing than with the non Overdrive configuration. Plus, these Ryzen CPUs have VERY cyclic behavior, and even on lesser models there has been a lot of benefit to adding even a moderately effective aftermarket cooler compared to any of the stock coolers, which doesn't directly pertain to the use of the U12A but it makes clear the fact that these CPUs benefit from cooling performance beyond what might be expected to be necessary going strictly off paper specs.

I would say if you have that cooler already, use it, and if you find it doesn't keep up well enough, upgrade. If it works ok for how YOU have things configured and is able to safely keep things within the margins, then fine, stick with it. Much will depend on YOUR use case and what kind of ambient temperature the system is being run in anyhow.

The change to the 5900x should not make a significant enough difference in overall power consumption to really be a factor in regard to the power supply's capability. Should be fine with what you have UNLESS it is a relatively old unit that has been around the block too many times.
I have no actual intention of overclocking, the 5900x from everything I have seen by itself out of the box should be more than enough for me, it's primary use is going to be in stuff like cyberpunk, minecraft, rendering videos occasionally. I'll look into my BIOS to see about disabling overdrive when I do manage to get a 5900x the cooler has never been installed, I'm still using the stock cooler that came with my 3600x, as for the paste, I'm more or less looking for recommendations on what would be either the "best" solution or ideas and recommendations for what would be sufficient, by no means am I sold on using graphene, it was just a passing thought I had.
Does my case configuration have any benefit for the noctua? when I install it it should be able to pull air in one side and push it out the other going in the same direction as the twin 180 fans at the bottom of the case ultimately pushing all of the warm air out the top.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Like I said, "out of the box" DOES mean overclocked for the majority of the premium chipset boards which are Ryzen compatible. So then, you'd need to hamstring the CPU compared to what "others" get, by disabling PBO in the BIOS in order to "not be overclocking". And if you use that cooler, I'd suggest that might be a good idea. But try it anyhow, you never know. I just wouldn't be too surprised to find it is not as good as some think it is. It's good, a very good product, for a particular use case though.
 

Sundau

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Like I said, "out of the box" DOES mean overclocked for the majority of the premium chipset boards which are Ryzen compatible. So then, you'd need to hamstring the CPU compared to what "others" get, by disabling PBO in the BIOS in order to "not be overclocking". And if you use that cooler, I'd suggest that might be a good idea. But try it anyhow, you never know. I just wouldn't be too surprised to find it is not as good as some think it is. It's good, a very good product, for a particular use case though.
My main concern is clearance, I'd upgrade something like the d14 but I'm not 100% sure it'll fit, my ram isn't particularly tall so I'm not concerned about that, I don't know how tall that cooler is or if it'll butt up against my GPU
 

Sundau

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My main concern is clearance, I'd upgrade something like the d14 but I'm not 100% sure it'll fit, my ram isn't particularly tall so I'm not concerned about that, I don't know how tall that cooler is or if it'll butt up against my GPU
My case states a cooler clearance of 162 mm and the d14 is 160mm
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So then, based on that, the HEIGHT should be ok. As for the width and other clearances, you should be good with any of the modern models.

I'd avoid the D14 as that was a very good cooler, but it was not configured to have enough additional RAM clearance and had interference issues with many kits AND it was not asymmetrically offset like the D15 and it's variants.

In any case, since you already have that cooler, I'd just try it unless you are of a mind to simply send it back and go after something larger. If you do, you probably want to look at one of these:



Noctua NH-D14 (Replace stock fans with NF-A14 industrialPPC 2000rpm)
Noctua NH-D15/D15 SE-AM4
Noctua NH-D14 (With original fans)
Thermalright Silver arrow IB-E Extreme
Cryorig R1 Ultimate or Universal
Be Quiet Dark rock Pro 4
Noctua NH-D15s
Thermalright Legrand Macho RT
Phanteks PH-TC14PE (BK,BL, OR or RD)
Deepcool Assassin III
Thermalright Macho X2
Thermalright Macho rev. C
Thermalright Macho rev.B
Thermalright ARO-M14G (Ryzen only)
SilentiumPC Fortis 3 HE1425


It may not be obvious, but is probably worth mentioning, that not all cooler models will fit all CPU sockets as aftermarket coolers generally require an adapter intended for use with that socket. Some coolers that fit an AMD platform might not fit a later AMD platform, or an Intel platform. Often these coolers come with adapters for multiple types of platforms but be sure to verify that a specific cooler WILL work with your platform before purchasing one and finding out later that it will not.
 
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