Question New Build. PC doesn't turn on when GPU is plugged in.

Sep 22, 2020
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Hey guys. I just put my new computer together and I'm having a couple problems.

1) When the 8-pin connector is plugged into the GPU, the PC won't do anything at all, won't turn on, nada.

2) When I take out the GPU and try to use the HDMI cable directly on the motherboard, the PC turns on, fans spinning and all, but the monitor isn't recognized. I haven't installed Windows on the harddrive yet because I can't even get a display. The monitor is fine because I've been using it on my laptop and I'm using it right now. Would it be possible that this is happening because there is a HDMI driver needed and should I try setting up using a DVI cable?

And is it possible to short-circuit the components with static charge but the components still work? Have played myself by setting this up in a carpeted room? But I've setup computers in this room in the past. It's just a thought.

I haven't put together a PC in years and I would appreciate anyone that could shed some light on my dilemma. Thanks!

Specs:

Ryzen 5 2600
Gigabyte RX580
650w 80+ bronze PSU
Gigabye B450M Aorus Elite
Corsair 2x8gb DDR4 3000mhz
Samsung 500gb 860 EVO SSD
 
Hey guys. I just put my new computer together and I'm having a couple problems.

1) When the 8-pin connector is plugged into the GPU, the PC won't do anything at all, won't turn on, nada.

2) When I take out the GPU and try to use the HDMI cable directly on the motherboard, the PC turns on, fans spinning and all, but the monitor isn't recognized. I haven't installed Windows on the harddrive yet because I can't even get a display. The monitor is fine because I've been using it on my laptop and I'm using it right now. Would it be possible that this is happening because there is a HDMI driver needed and should I try setting up using a DVI cable?

And is it possible to short-circuit the components with static charge but the components still work? Have played myself by setting this up in a carpeted room? But I've setup computers in this room in the past. It's just a thought.

I haven't put together a PC in years and I would appreciate anyone that could shed some light on my dilemma. Thanks!

Specs:

Ryzen 5 2600
Gigabyte RX580
650w 80+ bronze PSU
Gigabye B450M Aorus Elite
Corsair 2x8gb DDR4 3000mhz
Samsung 500gb 860 EVO SSD
First thing, forget about video from motherboard, it's not going to happen with that CPU, Only Ryzens with "G" can do that.
Second thing is to make sure extra power for GPU is available and plugged in.
You will not be able to install windows until you can see BIOS on the monitor so drivers and anything like that doesn't matter now.
That's all on the condition that everything is properly installed (no short on standoffs etc.) and correctly connected.
Make sure that RAM is inserted properly in appropriate slots as per MB manual (probably A2 and B2). Unless memory is working you won't be able to get any video.
 
Sep 22, 2020
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First thing, forget about video from motherboard, it's not going to happen with that CPU, Only Ryzens with "G" can do that.
Second thing is to make sure extra power for GPU is available and plugged in.
You will not be able to install windows until you can see BIOS on the monitor so drivers and anything like that doesn't matter now.
That's all on the condition that everything is properly installed (no short on standoffs etc.) and correctly connected.
Make sure that RAM is inserted properly in appropriate slots as per MB manual (probably A2 and B2). Unless memory is working you won't be able to get any video.
Thanks for the reply Mike. What exactly do you mean by "it's not going to happen with that CPU"? What's not going to happen?

Yes the PC turns on even when the videocard is in the PCIE slot but as soon as I plug in the power to it, the PC is pretty much dead. Memory is working fine, I tried 1 stick and 2 sticks and different slots too.

Any guesses what the problem can be?
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
He's saying that the mobo won't put out any video signal unless it has a CPU installed that also includes its own graphics processor system. But on examining the mobo manual it shows that the mobo DOES have its own graphics chip on it.

However, I suspect what has happened is that, since you originally had the add-on graphics cards installed in a PCIe slot, the mobo adjusted itself automatically to use that method of sending out a video signal, and it is NOT re-adjusting itself when the graphics card is removed. For purposes of getting the system to boot using the mobo graphics system you need to do a BIOS Reset. This will not solve your problem with the graphics card, but it will allow you to verify that the system works properly without that card.

Follow this process. Unplug your system from the wall so your system has no power source and open the case. See your mobo manual p. 12. Note item 16, the two-pin CLR_CMOS header at bottom middle, and item 11, the Battery in its holder. Note particularly the markings on the battery because you will remove it and them need to re-install it the right way around. The following will reset your system so it can boot using the mobo graphics, and then ensure a good set of configuration parameters.
  1. Remove the battery from its holder (Item 11, and p. 15).
  2. Go to the CLR_CMOS two-pin header (item 16, and p. 20) and not the one right beside it called CI. Using a jumper if you have one, or perhaps a screwdriver tip, short out those two pins for at least 5 seconds, maybe a but more, then remove the short.
  3. Re-install the battery right side out. Plug the system into the wall again.
  4. Ensure your monitor is plugged into the mobo's HDMI socket on the back panel of your case.
  5. See p. 21 about how to enter BIOS Setup if you are not familiar. Turn on your system and immediately hold down the Del key until the opening screen of BIOS Setup appears. (I'm assuming there WILL be a display on your monitor now.) From there press the F10 key to reach the Exit Menu (p. 37). Choose the Load Optimized Defaults item to ensure a complete set of configuration parameters is installed, then the Save and Exit Setup item at the top. Your system will reboot with factory-original settings and you can verify it is working, even though it will surely inform you you must insert a disk somewhere to boot from. You have not installed your OS yet.
So that's how to get back to starting point. You still have the graphics card issue to resolve, of course.
 

DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
He's saying that the mobo won't put out any video signal unless it has a CPU installed that also includes its own graphics processor system. But on examining the mobo manual it shows that the mobo DOES have its own graphics chip on it.
It doesn't.

You'll notice this fine print noted in every reference to integrated graphics.



They're being cagier than usual in describing the function, but you still have to use a CPU that has integrated graphics.
 
Reactions: CountMike
Sep 22, 2020
6
0
10
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He's saying that the mobo won't put out any video signal unless it has a CPU installed that also includes its own graphics processor system. But on examining the mobo manual it shows that the mobo DOES have its own graphics chip on it.

However, I suspect what has happened is that, since you originally had the add-on graphics cards installed in a PCIe slot, the mobo adjusted itself automatically to use that method of sending out a video signal, and it is NOT re-adjusting itself when the graphics card is removed. For purposes of getting the system to boot using the mobo graphics system you need to do a BIOS Reset. This will not solve your problem with the graphics card, but it will allow you to verify that the system works properly without that card.

Follow this process. Unplug your system from the wall so your system has no power source and open the case. See your mobo manual p. 12. Note item 16, the two-pin CLR_CMOS header at bottom middle, and item 11, the Battery in its holder. Note particularly the markings on the battery because you will remove it and them need to re-install it the right way around. The following will reset your system so it can boot using the mobo graphics, and then ensure a good set of configuration parameters.
  1. Remove the battery from its holder (Item 11, and p. 15).
  2. Go to the CLR_CMOS two-pin header (item 16, and p. 20) and not the one right beside it called CI. Using a jumper if you have one, or perhaps a screwdriver tip, short out those two pins for at least 5 seconds, maybe a but more, then remove the short.
  3. Re-install the battery right side out. Plug the system into the wall again.
  4. Ensure your monitor is plugged into the mobo's HDMI socket on the back panel of your case.
  5. See p. 21 about how to enter BIOS Setup if you are not familiar. Turn on your system and immediately hold down the Del key until the opening screen of BIOS Setup appears. (I'm assuming there WILL be a display on your monitor now.) From there press the F10 key to reach the Exit Menu (p. 37). Choose the Load Optimized Defaults item to ensure a complete set of configuration parameters is installed, then the Save and Exit Setup item at the top. Your system will reboot with factory-original settings and you can verify it is working, even though it will surely inform you you must insert a disk somewhere to boot from. You have not installed your OS yet.
So that's how to get back to starting point. You still have the graphics card issue to resolve, of course.
Thanks for the very detailed instructions Paperdoc. I tried all this and it hasn't changed the situation. I actually took out the battery yesterday but I didn't short the 2 pins like you told me to do, so I tried it again just now but I still got the same result.

Would this mean that the mobo might be faulty? Are there other things I can do? I'm having a computer guy come over today or tomorrow anyway. Would it be able to check if something is wrong with a voltmeter? Sadly I don't have a warranty on the mobo but I do have 2 year warranty on the videocard. I would check the videocard on somebody else's system but I don't know anyone around me with a compatible PC :/
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
I'm sorry. I misunderstood the manual. It says it has (uses) "Integrated Graphics suuport". I did not recognize that the phrase means is must have a CPU with the Integrated Graphics function, and does NOT have any mobo graphics chip. DSzymborski above is quite correct. So that is why my procedure did not enable mobo-based graphics, and NO, you mobo is NOT faulty. Perhaps your service person can do some check on the graphics card.
 
Sep 22, 2020
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I'm sorry. I misunderstood the manual. It says it has (uses) "Integrated Graphics suuport". I did not recognize that the phrase means is must have a CPU with the Integrated Graphics function, and does NOT have any mobo graphics chip. DSzymborski above is quite correct. So that is why my procedure did not enable mobo-based graphics, and NO, you mobo is NOT faulty. Perhaps your service person can do some check on the graphics card.
Okay. So what would that mean for my motherboard? Because I can't get a display without the graphics card either?

But I ordered another motherboard last night :/ Will at least switching out the motherboard and not using the videocard first help?
 
Okay. So what would that mean for my motherboard? Because I can't get a display without the graphics card either?

But I ordered another motherboard last night :/ Will at least switching out the motherboard and not using the videocard first help?
New MB would help only in case there was something wrong with PCIe slot in old one. You still need to insert dedicated GPU.
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
Be sure to grasp what CountMike is saying. Your system was orignally set up to work with NO graphics capablility in the CPU and depends on having a video card installed in a PCIe slot. As an attempt to diagnose, the suggestion was that you remove the graphics card and use the mobo's own ability to generate video from its back panel socket. BUT that ONLY works if you have a CPU that DOES include graphics capability, because the mobo does not have its own video chip. In the long run, when you get this problem fixed and it DOES work with an added video card, you will not need a different CPU that has graphics ability, although that would not cause a problem if you do get such a CPU. In the short run trying to figure out the problem, you cannot generate any video from that mobo unless you do get a CPU with graphics capability.
 
Sep 22, 2020
6
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Be sure to grasp what CountMike is saying. Your system was orignally set up to work with NO graphics capablility in the CPU and depends on having a video card installed in a PCIe slot. As an attempt to diagnose, the suggestion was that you remove the graphics card and use the mobo's own ability to generate video from its back panel socket. BUT that ONLY works if you have a CPU that DOES include graphics capability, because the mobo does not have its own video chip. In the long run, when you get this problem fixed and it DOES work with an added video card, you will not need a different CPU that has graphics ability, although that would not cause a problem if you do get such a CPU. In the short run trying to figure out the problem, you cannot generate any video from that mobo unless you do get a CPU with graphics capability.
Okay got it Paperdoc :)

I sadly don't have a warranty on the motherboard so I just ordered another one. I should've waited a little though because I'm also getting my videocard replaced which does have a warranty. Well, this should solve the problem. Thanks for all the help guys and hopefully I can come back to this thread if I run into any more problems.
 

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