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Question New computer - replacing drive - installing Linux

evotz

Prominent
Jun 21, 2019
3
0
510
0
I'm mostly a Linux person. Haven't really used Windows in any measurable context since Windows XP. Typically I tend to use older hardware because it's cheaper and it suits my needs. I can order a computer or notebook with Windows 7 on it and either wipe the hard drive or (a lot times) replace the hard drive with a low capacity SSD and install Ubuntu and it's no problem. Probably most of the hardware I deal with is 7 to 10 years old, I don't think I've ever bought anything that came with Windows 10 preinstalled, if that gives some bearing on how old my typical hardware is.

I have a project that needs a bit more power - maybe a later generation i5 or i7 processor - and what I've come across all come with Windows 10 or use m.2 drives. My question is, if I bought just a new m.2 drive or SATA SSD, can I still just take out the hard drive in the computer/notebook and replace it and install Linux?

I seem to remember, way back when, that there was talk about locking hardware into a specific operating system. Is that a thing? Or was it ever a thing? I've never experienced such a thing, but I've always used older hardware.

Typically the reason I replace the drive - I typically don't need a lot of disk space, 120GB should be fine - is because it would be difficult to reinstall Windows, should the need ever arise to put Windows back on the machine. The added cost of buying a low capacity SSD or m.2 drive isn't that much and it gives me the safety net of it needs to have Windows, I can just pop the original hard drive back in. I don't really have a need for dual boot, because I'm either going to use Linux or give it to someone else and let them use Windows.
 
I'm mostly a Linux person. Haven't really used Windows in any measurable context since Windows XP. Typically I tend to use older hardware because it's cheaper and it suits my needs. I can order a computer or notebook with Windows 7 on it and either wipe the hard drive or (a lot times) replace the hard drive with a low capacity SSD and install Ubuntu and it's no problem. Probably most of the hardware I deal with is 7 to 10 years old, I don't think I've ever bought anything that came with Windows 10 preinstalled, if that gives some bearing on how old my typical hardware is.

I have a project that needs a bit more power - maybe a later generation i5 or i7 processor - and what I've come across all come with Windows 10 or use m.2 drives. My question is, if I bought just a new m.2 drive or SATA SSD, can I still just take out the hard drive in the computer/notebook and replace it and install Linux?

I seem to remember, way back when, that there was talk about locking hardware into a specific operating system. Is that a thing? Or was it ever a thing? I've never experienced such a thing, but I've always used older hardware.

Typically the reason I replace the drive - I typically don't need a lot of disk space, 120GB should be fine - is because it would be difficult to reinstall Windows, should the need ever arise to put Windows back on the machine. The added cost of buying a low capacity SSD or m.2 drive isn't that much and it gives me the safety net of it needs to have Windows, I can just pop the original hard drive back in. I don't really have a need for dual boot, because I'm either going to use Linux or give it to someone else and let them use Windows.
Yes, of course, only one thing, make sure that your Linux distro is compatible with M.2 drives. SATA is not a problem, I'm right now running Linux mint of an SSD i dual boot with windows.
 

evotz

Prominent
Jun 21, 2019
3
0
510
0
See, I hadn't thought about that being a potential issue. Almost all of my usage is with Ubuntu, the latest version at that time, which would be Ubuntu 20.04. With that being a pretty common Linux distribution, I assume m.2 drives would work - but I may need to look into that a bit more.
 

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