Question New cpu

bredao

Honorable
Jan 29, 2016
28
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10,530
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Hi guys, how you doing?

I wanna change my pc and I don’t know what should I buy: i5 11600k or i7 10700f or r5 5600x.

After choose one of them, I will né help with mobo.

I need a little help here😬
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What is this system going to be used FOR?

What country are you in?

What is your budget for the FULL build?

What parts do you already have, along with exact model numbers, that you intend to or believe that you might be able to reuse with the new hardware?

What, exactly, does your system hardware configuration consist of at the moment?
 

bredao

Honorable
Jan 29, 2016
28
0
10,530
0
What is this system going to be used FOR?

What country are you in?

What is your budget for the FULL build?

What parts do you already have, along with exact model numbers, that you intend to or believe that you might be able to reuse with the new hardware?

What, exactly, does your system hardware configuration consist of at the moment?
I’m from Brazil and I will use for gaming. I have 2 hyperx 8gb 2400mhz, ssd, evga 600 bronze and gtx 1060 6gb (I will change it in the future)
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
That memory is too slow for anything new, unless you want to seriously hamstring the performance of your new system right out of the box.

SSD is probably fine if it's not too old or too small. If you're happy with it, then it's likely ok for now at least.

The EVGA 600w bronze is likely a low quality power supply by comparison to anything we'd call high quality or reliable. It's likely either a B series, BR series or something similar. They don't make a "good" 600w bronze model, so we know that regardless of WHICH model it actually is, it's probably a good idea to think about looking for a higher end model even if you weren't going to be upgrading. If you upgrade, it's the FIRST thing you should be looking at.

I realize it's difficult to get quality power supplies where you are, and expensive, but those facts don't change the fact that it's something you need to consider. Your system doesn't care that you live in a region where it's hard to find a quality unit. It only knows that poor quality units don't perform or last in similar fashion to higher quality units and that lower quality units tend to bombard your caps with high levels of ripple and noise, which shortens the life of the capacitors on your motherboard and graphics card. Not to mention a cheap unit, even a mediocre unit that we wouldn't expressly call "cheap", might lack some protections or have protections that are not implemented properly and might make your hardware vulnerable to damage.


You did not mention what CPU and motherboard you have right now, and that would be at least moderately helpful in determining where you are coming from in order to figure out where you need to go.
 
Reactions: bredao

bredao

Honorable
Jan 29, 2016
28
0
10,530
0
That memory is too slow for anything new, unless you want to seriously hamstring the performance of your new system right out of the box.

SSD is probably fine if it's not too old or too small. If you're happy with it, then it's likely ok for now at least.

The EVGA 600w bronze is likely a low quality power supply by comparison to anything we'd call high quality or reliable. It's likely either a B series, BR series or something similar. They don't make a "good" 600w bronze model, so we know that regardless of WHICH model it actually is, it's probably a good idea to think about looking for a higher end model even if you weren't going to be upgrading. If you upgrade, it's the FIRST thing you should be looking at.

I realize it's difficult to get quality power supplies where you are, and expensive, but those facts don't change the fact that it's something you need to consider. Your system doesn't care that you live in a region where it's hard to find a quality unit. It only knows that poor quality units don't perform or last in similar fashion to higher quality units and that lower quality units tend to bombard your caps with high levels of ripple and noise, which shortens the life of the capacitors on your motherboard and graphics card. Not to mention a cheap unit, even a mediocre unit that we wouldn't expressly call "cheap", might lack some protections or have protections that are not implemented properly and might make your hardware vulnerable to damage.


You did not mention what CPU and motherboard you have right now, and that would be at least moderately helpful in determining where you are coming from in order to figure out where you need to go.
Thank you for your explanation!

here it is:
I5 6600 -- Kingston Hyperx fury 8gb DDR4 2133mhz -- Sandisk SSD Ultra II 120gb + 400gb + HD 500gb -- PSU EVGA 600b B1 -- Case Cougar archon -- Mobo Z170M D3h DDR4

for now i will change mobo and cpu than, as you explain to me psu and finally gpu.... after pay everything i will change my ram... in brazil everything are really expensive and i need to but it carefully to not put me in a bad situation.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Ok, so, please look at it like this.

You have a much newer CPU than a LOT of people we see on here wanting to upgrade or complaining about performance. And it's true, your CPU IS a few years old.

But, it's not TERRIBLY old, it's just somewhat old. It is still much better than a lot of folks hardware who come here. Totally understand though that there is a DEFINITE need for an upgrade if you are looking for better gaming performance.

I just don't think that the CPU is your #1 need.

For gaming, I guarantee that your graphics card is 75% of what is holding you back unless you are playing exclusively CPU bound games, which is very unlikely with that configuration. You need to first look at a new GPU card if instant gains are what you are looking for.

If you upgrade the graphics card and PSU, now, before anything else, you WILL see SOME gains. If you upgrade ONLY the CPU and motherboard now, and nothing else, you are unlikely to see any substantial gains except in a very few titles that are almost exclusively CPU bound, and that is not that many titles really.

Graphics card and PSU gets you instant gains. Full upgrade including platform (CPU, memory and motherboard) AND graphics card with an appropriate PSU, gets you stability and a lack of of irritating things like micro stutters caused by poor CPU and memory performance, as a whole. So, food for thought.

On the other hand, if you are playing very lightweight games, with very low settings, and a consistently low frame rate is your problem, THEN it is probably the CPU/platform that needs to be addressed.
 

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