Question New GPU, system not booting...

Sep 14, 2019
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Looking for some knowledgeable advice,

I just got a new GPU, a msi rx750 8GB. I hooked it up and doesn’t send a signal to the monitor then cuts out and restarts the computer after around 2 minutes to the same black screen, doesn’t boot.

I got a new power supply Cx550w because it seemed like a power issue and my old supply was a cheap supply that came stock. Same thing happens upon installing the new psu.

Boots with onboard graphics and the old gpu still.

Any advice please?

Windows 10
i7 3770 3.40ghz
16gb Ram
Corsair 550w psu
 
By the way, did you connect the PCI-E cables to the GPU from your PSU ? Make sure all the PCI-E connectors are properly plugged to the video card, and the Monitor's cable is going to the GPU, and not the onboard graphics.

Which guide do you want, and for what ? Updating BIOS, or CMOS ? To clear the CMOS, you can follow these steps, if you wish. Just for reference.

The easiest way to clear the CMOS is to enter the BIOS setup utility and choose Reset BIOS Settings to their factory default levels.

The exact menu option in your particular motherboard's BIOS may differ but look for phrases like reset to default, factory default, clear BIOS, load setup defaults, etc. Every manufacturer seems to have their own way of wording it. The BIOS Settings option is usually located near the bottom of the screen, or at the end of your BIOS options, depending on how it's structured. If you're having trouble finding it, look close to where the Save or Save & Exit options are because they're usually around those.

Another way to clear CMOS is to reseat the CMOS battery. Start by making sure your computer is unplugged. Next, open up your computer's case if you're using a desktop PC, or find and open the small CMOS battery panel if you're using a tablet or laptop computer.

Finally, remove the CMOS battery for a few minutes and then put it back in. Close the case or battery panel and then plug in, or reattach the computer's main battery. By disconnecting and then reconnecting the CMOS battery, you remove the source of power that saves your computer's BIOS settings, resetting them to default.

Another way to clear the CMOS is to short the CLEAR CMOS jumper on your motherboard, assuming your motherboard has one. Make sure your computer is unplugged and then open it up. Look around your motherboard's surface for a jumper with the CLEAR CMOS label, which will be located on the motherboard and near the jumper. These jumpers are often located near the BIOS chip itself or next to the CMOS battery. Some other names by which you might see this jumper labeled include CLRPWD, PASSWORD, or even just CLEAR.

Do all these things VERY carefully, if you are not comfortable, then ask someone else for help, if need be.
 

Joakim Agren

Proper
Sep 5, 2019
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Boot from the old GPU then in Windows right click on the Windows menu and select Disk Management. Then on the list of drives that appear select your boot drive (usually disk 0) Right click that one and then select properties and then select the Volume tab. here you will be able to see if your current boot drive are using Master Boot Record (MBR) as partion type. If it does then it is not compatible with many newer AMD GPU's. many AMD's GPU's (for instance all the Sapphire cards) must boot into the more secure type called UEFI Boot and your drive must then be partitioned to the more modern GUID Partion Table (GPT). To do this conversion without lossing data you must use a third party tool for instance: The partition tool EaseUS Partition Master. You can read more about how to use it for this here: https://www.easeus.com/partition-manager-software/convert-mbr-to-gpt-gpt-to-mbr-using-cmd-without-losing-data.html

As usual always make sure that you have backed up any important data before doing this though! Just in case...

Then enter your mother board BIOS/UEFI and make sure that UEFI Boot mode is selected and not BIOS/Legacy/ CSM mode under the boot options. Now try to once again install the new GPU and if it boots and you get a signal you know this was the cause.
 
Reactions: Metal Messiah.
Boot from the old GPU then in Windows right click on the Windows menu and select Disk Management. Then on the list of drives that appear select your boot drive (usually disk 0) Right click that one and then select properties and then select the Volume tab. here you will be able to see if your current boot drive are using Master Boot Record (MBR) as partion type. If it does then it is not compatible with many newer AMD GPU's. many AMD's GPU's (for instance all the Sapphire cards) must boot into the more secure type called UEFI Boot and your drive must then be partitioned to the more modern GUID Partion Table (GPT).
THANKS for posting this info. I wasn't aware that AMD cards don't boot in MBR mode. I will make a note of this, as this info might come in handy. Interesting.
 

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