Question New home, planning home network and could use some advice.

matthewh133

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Hi all, I'm about to move into my new home and I've left planning the internet situation a little late. On Tuesday my electrician and Frontier service tech will be here to install what's required... the issue is I don't yet have a router or 100% locked in plan.

We will be getting Frontier FIOS 500/500 installed, and my current thought process is to have them install a router into a closet upstairs, then wire a bunch of ethernet cables from here to a few different rooms in the house where there will be desktop computers, playstations, etc for the fastest speeds. The issue here obviously is that the wireless signal will be weak from a closet, so I also need a way to get good signal upstairs and downstairs for our phones, the nest thermostat, doorbell etc.

I do currently own a Netgear Orbi setup, so I'm thinking I could have one upstairs and one downstairs plugged into one of the ethernet ports in the wall that come from the router.

So I guess I have a couple of questions:

Is there anything wrong with this plan? What about compatability between the router and Netgear Orbi devices?

Do you have any router suggestions that will take full advantage of our 500/500 speeds, and support potential gigabit in the future? It must also have at least 4, preferably 5 ethernet ports for 5 rooms throughout the house. Our main uses for the internet will be gaming and 4k/1080p streaming.
 

kanewolf

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Is this still under construction with the ability to pull wire easily? If so, then pull ethernet to the ceiling in the family room, the hallway near the kids bedrooms and any other area that needs WIFI. Run those cables back to the central "network closet". You will add "smoke detector" style access points in each of those locations. You can disable the WIFI on the FIOS router. Also put ethernet cables to the eves of the house or anywhere you may want outdoor cameras. Consider an ethernet cable on the patio/pool area. You can add an outdoor rated WIFI access point to cover the back yard.
Put cables for every TV and every desk or desktop PC.
When you are ready to enable all this cabling, you use a POE switch to power (and provide network to) these access points and cameras.
 
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So I guess I have a couple of questions:

Is there anything wrong with this plan? What about compatability between the router and Netgear Orbi devices?

Do you have any router suggestions that will take full advantage of our 500/500 speeds, and support potential gigabit in the future? It must also have at least 4, preferably 5 ethernet ports for 5 rooms throughout the house. Our main uses for the internet will be gaming and 4k/1080p streaming.
You shouldn't have any compatability issues.

Your stock router will be fine, and just get a switch for more ports. If you're wiring the whole house like suggested above, you'll need one anyways for all those runs.
 

matthewh133

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You shouldn't have any compatability issues.

Your stock router will be fine, and just get a switch for more ports. If you're wiring the whole house like suggested above, you'll need one anyways for all those runs.
When you say "stock" router, what do you mean? I only have the Netgear Orbis right now. I'm happy to invest some money in a good router, I really want this to be future-proof and get the best speeds possible.
 
I don't know about frontier but the router verizon puts in with their fios plan are fairly good. This kinda depends if you are going to put in tv package from them also. They will require you install their router so you might as well use it for your data also. If you are not getting tv you want them to activate the ethernet port on the ONT so you can use any router. If they are like verizon the coax connection does not use docsis so you are limited to their devices.

I suppose you could put a orbis router in the central closet if you want. The router you place in the main closet is not fancy. In general you get poor wifi from these locations, many times this is a metal box in the wall that blocks signals. The key feature you want is gigabit wan and lan ports. Even a $50 router can pass a gigabit of wan/lan traffic.

For the wifi you place AP in the remote rooms to get your coverage. Your orbis systems can run as AP, pretty much any router can. Orbis is mostly marketing hype for wireless repeater. You do not need the repeater function since you will have ethernet cables.
 

matthewh133

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Is this still under construction with the ability to pull wire easily? If so, then pull ethernet to the ceiling in the family room, the hallway near the kids bedrooms and any other area that needs WIFI. Run those cables back to the central "network closet". You will add "smoke detector" style access points in each of those locations. You can disable the WIFI on the FIOS router. Also put ethernet cables to the eves of the house or anywhere you may want outdoor cameras. Consider an ethernet cable on the patio/pool area. You can add an outdoor rated WIFI access point to cover the back yard.
Put cables for every TV and every desk or desktop PC.
When you are ready to enable all this cabling, you use a POE switch to power (and provide network to) these access points and cameras.
Thanks for the information. It's no longer under construction, but we have a crawl space above our second level which should make wiring not too much of an issue. Good point on the ethernet to the doorbell, I hadn't thought of that.

I was planning on purchasing my own router and skipping the extra $10 a month that they charge to use theirs. Do you have any suggestions for something that is future proof and will take full advantage of the 500/500 speeds. Money isn't really an issue.
 
When you say "stock" router, what do you mean? I only have the Netgear Orbis right now. I'm happy to invest some money in a good router, I really want this to be future-proof and get the best speeds possible.
Sorry, the one provided by the isp--they usually will have enough capability for their own service.

If you want future proof, you'll want to go with enterprise like solutions--separate router, separate access points, not consumer mesh. But that gets expensive. A lot of people will settle on Ubiquiti products. Price those out and see what you think.
 
I was planning on purchasing my own router and skipping the extra $10 a month that they charge to use theirs. Do you have any suggestions for something that is future proof and will take full advantage of the 500/500 speeds. Money isn't really an issue.
If you can use your own router, almost any modern router can hit those speeds and higher. Even a $45 tplink my wife got can hit 700Mbps. And with your orbi setup, you don't have to worry if the wifi on it even works, lol.
 

Ralston18

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Also: document everything.

1) Use a copy of the house floor plan to record the cable runs and wall plate locations. Number the wall outlets and permanently mark somewhere inside the box.

2) Ensure that each cable is permanently marked on each end as a means of identification.

3) Ensure that the installer leaves a couple of extra feet on each cable end to allow for any future re-terminations.

4) Take photographs before walls and ceilings get closed up. Especially where there is nearby ductwork, electrical cables, water lines, or other cabling installed. (Verify that they are shown on the floor plans.)
 

kanewolf

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Also: document everything.

1) Use a copy of the house floor plan to record the cable runs and wall plate locations. Number the wall outlets and permanently mark somewhere inside the box.

2) Ensure that each cable is permanently marked on each end as a means of identification.

3) Ensure that the installer leaves a couple of extra feet on each cable end to allow for any future re-terminations.

4) Take photographs before walls and ceilings get closed up. Especially where there is nearby ductwork, electrical cables, water lines, or other cabling installed. (Verify that they are shown on the floor plans.)
Unfortunately the OP asked the question too late in the process for your #4. Post #7 says that it is already walled in.
 

matthewh133

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Not really. One, Linksys isn't top dog any more. Two, ebay has a lot of fakes. Three, you don't need that much wifi support. Four, in that price range tplink and asus provide much, much better value.
Ok thank you. So the reason there are $400 routers is because of their WiFi capabilities, which in this instance don't matter because its job will not be to give wifi to the home? Going with something much cheaper in this instance is not going to hurt my performance whatsoever? What do I need to look for to ensure it will be compatible with Frontier FIOS 500/500? Honestly there's just so many routers out there and I'm incredibly overwhelmed.

Oh, and someone mentioned the amount of ethernet ports don't matter because you can buy a switch that adds more, is this correct? Really appreciate all of the information.
 

kanewolf

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Ok thank you. So the reason there are $400 routers is because of their WiFi capabilities, which in this instance don't matter because its job will not be to give wifi to the home? Going with something much cheaper in this instance is not going to hurt my performance whatsoever? What do I need to look for to ensure it will be compatible with Frontier FIOS 500/500? Honestly there's just so many routers out there and I'm incredibly overwhelmed.
The reason I recommend multiple WIFI access points, is that portable devices have much lower transmit power than the router. You need to get the WIFI source nearer the device.
Are you using FIOS for TV ? If so, then you generally HAVE to use their router.
 

matthewh133

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The reason I recommend multiple WIFI access points, is that portable devices have much lower transmit power than the router. You need to get the WIFI source nearer the device.
Are you using FIOS for TV ? If so, then you generally HAVE to use their router.
No we aren't installing cable television, this is why I'm looking for my own router to save the $10 a month and hopefully have even better performance.
 

kanewolf

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No we aren't installing cable television, this is why I'm looking for my own router to save the $10 a month and hopefully have even better performance.
OK, then you want ethernet from the ONT rather than coax.
The more advanced the router, the more difficult it is to use. (generally). What features are REQUIRED for your router? Hardware VPN? Parental controls? You need to come up with a list of required features. We may then be able to suggest some options. I would recommend separating the router functions from the WIFI.
 

matthewh133

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OK, then you want ethernet from the ONT rather than coax.
The more advanced the router, the more difficult it is to use. (generally). What features are REQUIRED for your router? Hardware VPN? Parental controls? You need to come up with a list of required features. We may then be able to suggest some options. I would recommend separating the router functions from the WIFI.
Thanks. We do not need parental control, a hardware VPN would be nice I guess, but not 100% necessary. Our biggest priority is speed and reliability, and being able to put ethernet to 5 different spots in the house.

2 offices with desktop computers
1 in the living room downstairs for Wifi at the TV (plug in Netgear Orbi here for WiFi downstairs then put an ethernet from this to the Playstation)
1 to the doorbell (Nest)
1 to upstairs living room (another Orbi).
 
Buy a 8 port switch to run the house network. Sounds like you need nothing real special for a router. They make wired only routers but you do not save much if anything and they are not any faster.

Find a inexpensive router with gigabit lan and wan ports. Almost all routers can do almost 1gbit wan/lan. They do this by moving the NAT function off the main cpu so the size of he cpu is less of a concern. Be aware using some feature like firewall or vpn forces the traffic via the cpu. Even very high end consumer routers will cap out at 250-300mbps and much less if you try to use VPN.

In general a router that has a number say 1200-1750 will be your best option. You do not really care about the wifi speed. Routers with this number meet your average home users wifi needs so there tends to be good selection and pricing.
 

matthewh133

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Buy a 8 port switch to run the house network. Sounds like you need nothing real special for a router. They make wired only routers but you do not save much if anything and they are not any faster.

Find a inexpensive router with gigabit lan and wan ports. Almost all routers can do almost 1gbit wan/lan. They do this by moving the NAT function off the main cpu so the size of he cpu is less of a concern. Be aware using some feature like firewall or vpn forces the traffic via the cpu. Even very high end consumer routers will cap out at 250-300mbps and much less if you try to use VPN.

In general a router that has a number say 1200-1750 will be your best option. You do not really care about the wifi speed. Routers with this number meet your average home users wifi needs so there tends to be good selection and pricing.
Ok, so one of these:

https://www.amazon.com/Ethernet-Splitter-Optimization-Unmanaged-TL-SG108/dp/B00A121WN6/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=8+port+ethernet+switch&qid=1583169394&s=electronics&sr=1-3

Then one of these:

https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-AC1750-Smart-WiFi-Router/dp/B079JD7F7G/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=router&qid=1583169439&s=electronics&sr=1-3

Will provide me with the full speeds available from our service and also all of the ports I will require?
 

failboat

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Little bump as I need to order this tonight
Have you discussed wiring? If you want it future proofed you want to control this part as it's the most difficult to replace. Cat6A UTP is what I would recommend. CMR all copper UL Listed. Have it ran back to a central location and terminate it into a patch panel thats rated the same. Buy keystones that are rated the same. You can do keystones on both sides if you get a keystone patch panel. monoprice has good stuff. any type of foiling or shield isn't needed or recommended. ethernet is a high fraud item. I'd recommend sourcing it well and looking for the UL Listed rating. For patch cables you can buy them in bulk on monoprice and cat5e UTP is fine for 1Gbs.

You can try and plan it so that the wires are replaceable if you can get some runs inside conduit. Depends on your layout. You can plan in a few spots where you can pull cable through then fish it to the spot where it's in. If you have a basement and attic and run from 1 to the other it's very nice to have conduit running all the way up. Access points on the ceiling is the way to go these days.

https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=18600
 
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