Question New Laptop: 10th generation Intel Core i5 but base frequency only 1.0 GHz ?

Dec 22, 2019
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I'm looking at laptops. I'm not a gamer. I'm not editing video.

I mostly use Chrome with a lot of tabs and windows open, video streaming, casting to TV, etc.

This linked new HP Pavilion for sale has a lot of the features I'm looking for, recent processor with quad cores, enough RAM 12GB, SSD, 1920x1080 touch screen, metal, etc. at a good price. $549.

»store.hp.com/us/en/pdp/h ··· --15-cs3

I'm no expert on the CPU specs. I've watched a few videos and read articles about the multitude of CPU specs, generations, parameters, etc. One thing that caught my eye on this is that while the CPU's main attributes, it being Core i5, and also the newest, 10th Generation, are both pluses, I want to understand why the base frequency is a mere 1.0 GHz.

It's described as
Intel® Core™ i5-1035G1 (1.0 GHz base frequency, up to 3.6 GHz with Intel® Turbo Boost Technology, 6 MB cache, 4 cores)

(In comparison I currently have an HP Envy x360 that's a few years old with a Core i7, but only 6th Gen, model 6560 at 2.20 GHz with max turbo of 3.20 GHz, only 4 MB cache and only 2 cores)

There are countless options for the CPUs on the market. I'm just wondering if this 1.0 GHz base frequency is some kind of greatly throttled CPU that needs to be avoided, even though it's 10th Generation, current Intel Core i5.

Please keep in mind my use case....a lot of Chrome, streaming video, casting to TV....but not gaming or editing video, if you'd like to reply. Thanks!
 
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Dec 22, 2019
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Thank yoou
Full load frequency is what counts. Modern laptops have pretty aggressive power saving features.
Thank you. I assume the 3.6 GHz is what you're calling "full load frequency." If so, how does that rate for my use case? I'm going to update the specs on my old CPU above.
 
Dec 22, 2019
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The processor is definitely fast enough for what you are doing. Playback up to 4k should work fine, given the computer is using the boost.
The boost speed depends on how hot your computer is, and the battery life.
(The new cpu is slightly less than double the speed of the old one)
 
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