Question new pc build any issues

what do you think of the build

  • Great

    Votes: 2 40.0%
  • Good

    Votes: 1 20.0%
  • ok

    Votes: 2 40.0%
  • meh

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • wowzers you f++++d up

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • yikes

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    5
  • Poll closed .
May 20, 2019
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PCPartPicker Part List
demcifilter HAF XB EVO fan filter kit as well
and a windows 10 key
RGB Light strip ASUS ROG Addressable RGB 5050 LED 60cm (i might use multiple)
comes to around $3403 plus tax canadian.

my current setup is a gateway pc with a i5 2320, gtx 680 and 8 gb of ram. and a 500gb hard drive (no ssd), a microsoft 850 wireless keyboard and mouse. all which i have had for many many years as well as a 32 inch samsung tv which ive had for 7 years. with little to no issues.

so i am building a new pc. i dont want any watercooling and im fairly set on the products. just wanna make sure the thing wont overheat. i will not be overclocking.
essentially i will have the noctua d15s with 2 fans not just one. 2 front 140mm fans used as intake, a 120mm in the back used as exhaust, the psu will be fan down because of blockage on top of psu and the filter is on bottom. 2 80mm fan on bottom rear im not sure if i will go exhaust or intake i was thinking intake to make it more possitive pressure and then the air would be blowing air directly on the ssd and hdd.
other than that is there anything that speaks ERRORS that i need to fix.
psu i choose because of its ratings and power curve. as well the fact that it does not turn on fan until about 300 watts.
as for keyboard and mouse i will using a das keyboard 4 pro DASK4MKPROCLI blue switch. and a logitech g703 with the g powerplay mousepad (undecided trying to get some info on the mousepad is it possible to turn off the rgb lights, does the pad slip around everywhere, as well as does the ends of the pad curl up and come apart.)

someone had recommended a Z370-F strix board but thats 800$ canadian so no thank you. i dont really wanna save any money but seriously a $800+ board lets get serious. this is no by means a high end gaming pc. as i said it will NOT be overclocked. and i dont wanna pay $800+ for features i wont even use. i wanna keep within the mostly black color scheme besides the fans which all are the noctua brown color. no rgb fans lol im not a kid that likes shinny things.

what i currently use my pc for is facebook, youtube, wow, cs:go, would like to get into battlefield or something as well.
im not the one to be over the top while gaming. the pc will be also used for movies so bright lights that cant be turned off is annoying and no electrical tape is not a solution.

id like to keep manufactures the same if they have rgb so that i can turn them off and on easily and adjust them to the same thing all at once easily without going through a bunch of different programs. i might sacrifice some performance for looks but that is ok with me.

i choose 9700k for some future proofing ive had my current setup and would like the new one for 6+ years as well. gpu i picked a 1660ti because compared to a 1070 or a 2070 i think it best suits what im doing with it and if i need to upgrade in a couple years then its a easy fix compared to a cpu (if they change a socket again)

i choose the 750 watt psu because of the efficiency curve it has considering my max wattage would be around 390 and my idle should be around 175 i am right in its peak. also im hoping if im just on facebook youtube etc then the psu fan wont turn on at all cause it doesnt until 300 watts.

32gb of ram for future proofing. and to allow for dual channel. (i know i could do 2x8gb but i like the 32 gb especially since chrome keeps wanting more of it.)

i know nvme is overkill as most of it for what im doing with it but it does come with some future proofing.

any suggestions would be great. i will reply back with my thoughts on the matter and take your opinion into account

**** i will be going to a samsung evo plus nvme m.2 500 gb ssd instead because of recommendations from person below
 
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Reactions: coastie65
I guess someone will find something to nit pick, but I don't see any problems. Looks good. The Cooler Master HAF, the HAF is "High Air Flow" and you have plenty of fans. I am using an older Cooler Master HAF 912 and it stays nice and cooler. You CPU cooler is a good one. The first thing I look at is the PSU. That is where they usually cheap out and the PSU can and will take out the entire rig if it goes south. I went 32 Gb on my Ram when I did my upgrade early this month. I waffled between the i7 8700k and i7 9700k and ended up going with the 8700 ( no particular reason ). I did use the ASUS Strix Motherboard in my upgrade. I don't usually use those pricey things. I have always Used ASUS, usually in the $150 USD range. As for the power supply, you did some homework on the wattage, which is fine, but more important is how much you have on the +12v Rail and what the video card requires. I have been tripped up once by that. You Got a Corsair so that wont be an issue. I have always used Corsair except once. It was an Antec that tripped me up.
 
Great setup.

The motherboard's original BIOS does not support that CPU. The CPU has been out a good 7 months so it shouldn't an issue unless you get the box that has been sitting on the shelf for over 7 months. Really low chance of an issue, but just want you to be aware.

I think you are overestimating the system power consumption. Not a huge deal, but I bet it idles around 50-70 Watts and maxes at around 275-300 ... that's back of the envelope numbers without putting much effort into it.
 
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May 20, 2019
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I guess someone will find something to nit pick, but I don't see any problems. Looks good. The Cooler Master HAF, the HAF is "High Air Flow" and you have plenty of fans. I am using an older Cooler Master HAF 912 and it stays nice and cooler. You CPU cooler is a good one. The first thing I look at is the PSU. That is where they usually cheap out and the PSU can and will take out the entire rig if it goes south. I went 32 Gb on my Ram when I did my upgrade early this month. I waffled between the i7 8700k and i7 9700k and ended up going with the 8700 ( no particular reason ). I did use the ASUS Strix Motherboard in my upgrade. I don't usually use those pricey things. I have always Used ASUS, usually in the $150 USD range. As for the power supply, you did some homework on the wattage, which is fine, but more important is how much you have on the +12v Rail and what the video card requires. I have been tripped up once by that. You Got a Corsair so that wont be an issue. I have always used Corsair except once. It was an Antec that tripped me up.
how do i check what my gpu requires and how much is available on my 12v rail have never heard of checking such a thing
 
May 20, 2019
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Great setup.

The motherboard's original BIOS does not support that CPU. The CPU has been out a good 7 months so it shouldn't an issue unless you get the box that has been sitting on the shelf for over 7 months. Really low chance of an issue, but just want you to be aware.

I think you are overestimating the system power consumption. Not a huge deal, but I bet it idles around 50-70 Watts and maxes at around 275-300 ... that's back of the envelope numbers without put much effort into it.
im basing my watt usage on pc part picker. idle watt my current pc uses 150 watts at idle so i figure more fans etc bigger gpu more watts at idle the cooler master website for wattage estimation was down when doing it
 
May 20, 2019
37
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I guess someone will find something to nit pick, but I don't see any problems. Looks good. The Cooler Master HAF, the HAF is "High Air Flow" and you have plenty of fans. I am using an older Cooler Master HAF 912 and it stays nice and cooler. You CPU cooler is a good one. The first thing I look at is the PSU. That is where they usually cheap out and the PSU can and will take out the entire rig if it goes south. I went 32 Gb on my Ram when I did my upgrade early this month. I waffled between the i7 8700k and i7 9700k and ended up going with the 8700 ( no particular reason ). I did use the ASUS Strix Motherboard in my upgrade. I don't usually use those pricey things. I have always Used ASUS, usually in the $150 USD range. As for the power supply, you did some homework on the wattage, which is fine, but more important is how much you have on the +12v Rail and what the video card requires. I have been tripped up once by that. You Got a Corsair so that wont be an issue. I have always used Corsair except once. It was an Antec that tripped me up.
ok looking online the asus website says recommended psu 450watts 8 pin connector. of course the hx750 would have a 8 pin no worries there didnt even check...
but the power on the hx750 says
max load
+3.3v 25A 150 watts
+5v 25A 150 watts
+12v 62.5A 750watts
-12v 0.8A 9.6watts
+5vsb 3a 15Watts

so i have no clue what any of that means at all.
 
so i have no clue what any of that means at all.
The +12v is what's primarily used by modern hardware, and any modern high-quality PSU should be able to deliver at or near its full capacity to that, which is what you see there.

I agree that you probably don't need a PSU with quite that much capacity though. A good 550 or 650 watt PSU should be more than enough for that hardware. Your main sources of power draw will be the CPU and GPU. A 1660 Ti is fairly efficient, only drawing around 130 watts under full load. A stock-clocked 9700K will typically draw less than that under normal loads, though potentially more under certain loads utilizing all cores in particular ways, but you'll likely only ever encounter that in stress tests. Other components like drives and fans generally won't draw that much power. As such, my estimate would be that the power draw from the PSU for all components under a heavy gaming load probably wouldn't exceed 350 watts or so with that hardware, and would typically be less. You ideally shouldn't be running PSUs up near their limits though, so something around the 600 watt range would likely be good, and still leave you with the option to move to a graphics card with higher power demands in the future.

If I had to make any major changes to the build though, it would be to target a higher resolution and/or refresh rate for a system in that price range. Do you have the monitor already? 1080p is arguably a bit low for a 32" screen, and many would argue even for a 27" screen, unless you will be seated relatively far away from it, as the pixel density would be fairly low at that size. 1440p would arguably be better for those larger screen sizes, though you might want a bit faster graphics card for that, perhaps an RTX 2060 for example.

And with 144Hz high-refresh rate screens becoming more common these days, for a system that will be used for gaming, I would ideally want more than 60Hz, at least when at 1080p. At that resolution, the hardware you have in this build should be able to push significantly more than 60fps in most current games, and having the screen be able to display those extra frames for smoother motion would be nice. So, a 144Hz screen that supports FreeSync over a DisplayPort connection to better handle those frame rates in between could be a good option.

As this build currently stands, a 1660 Ti should be a pretty good card for 1080p, but the i7-9700K seems perhaps a bit overkill for a 60Hz panel. Its benefits over something like an i5 or a Ryzen 2600X at half the cost will be limited, especially when not trying to maximize frame rates at 1080p on a high refresh rate screen. So, I would consider going with a less expensive CPU, motherboard, and possibly less RAM unless you think you'll have need for 32GB within the next few years. I also wouldn't put over CAD $250 toward case fans and a controller. You shouldn't need to spend anywhere near that much on cooling to keep this hardware running at reasonable temperatures, especially if you have no intention to overclock. And if you did go with something less than a 9700K, you could probably get away with a less expensive CPU cooler as well.

Much of that money might be better directed toward a monitor with a higher resolution and/or refresh rate, and a higher-end graphics card, particularly if you decided to go with 1440p resolution.
 
May 20, 2019
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The +12v is what's primarily used by modern hardware, and any modern high-quality PSU should be able to deliver at or near its full capacity to that, which is what you see there.

I agree that you probably don't need a PSU with quite that much capacity though. A good 550 or 650 watt PSU should be more than enough for that hardware. Your main sources of power draw will be the CPU and GPU. A 1660 Ti is fairly efficient, only drawing around 130 watts under full load. A stock-clocked 9700K will typically draw less than that under normal loads, though potentially more under certain loads utilizing all cores in particular ways, but you'll likely only ever encounter that in stress tests. Other components like drives and fans generally won't draw that much power. As such, my estimate would be that the power draw from the PSU for all components under a heavy gaming load probably wouldn't exceed 350 watts or so with that hardware, and would typically be less. You ideally shouldn't be running PSUs up near their limits though, so something around the 600 watt range would likely be good, and still leave you with the option to move to a graphics card with higher power demands in the future. there were some features i also liked in the hx750 being its a 80+ platinum certified as well as having all black cables. so i dont think i will need to go to cablemods (hopeful) and i like it being 100% modular.

If I had to make any major changes to the build though, it would be to target a higher resolution and/or refresh rate for a system in that price range. Do you have the monitor already? 1080p is arguably a bit low for a 32" screen, and many would argue even for a 27" screen, unless you will be seated relatively far away from it, as the pixel density would be fairly low at that size. 1440p would arguably be better for those larger screen sizes, though you might want a bit faster graphics card for that, perhaps an RTX 2060 for example.

And with 144Hz high-refresh rate screens becoming more common these days, for a system that will be used for gaming, I would ideally want more than 60Hz, at least when at 1080p. At that resolution, the hardware you have in this build should be able to push significantly more than 60fps in most current games, and having the screen be able to display those extra frames for smoother motion would be nice. So, a 144Hz screen that supports FreeSync over a DisplayPort connection to better handle those frame rates in between could be a good option.

As this build currently stands, a 1660 Ti should be a pretty good card for 1080p, but the i7-9700K seems perhaps a bit overkill for a 60Hz panel. Its benefits over something like an i5 or a Ryzen 2600X at half the cost will be limited, especially when not trying to maximize frame rates at 1080p on a high refresh rate screen. So, I would consider going with a less expensive CPU, motherboard, and possibly less RAM unless you think you'll have need for 32GB within the next few years. I also wouldn't put over CAD $250 toward case fans and a controller. You shouldn't need to spend anywhere near that much on cooling to keep this hardware running at reasonable temperatures, especially if you have no intention to overclock. And if you did go with something less than a 9700K, you could probably get away with a less expensive CPU cooler as well.

Much of that money might be better directed toward a monitor with a higher resolution and/or refresh rate, and a higher-end graphics card, particularly if you decided to go with 1440p resolution.
thank you for the information. when i was looking into monitors i wanted to stick with the big brands. i didnt want it to look like a gaming monitor as for looks and design. i wanted a decent upgrade from what i wanted now. which compared to
SAMSUNG 32" Class HD (720P) LCD TV (LN32D403) i think the 32 inch monitor and i like the curved aspect as well. i just bought a curved 65 inch tv a year ago and i love it. and all the other monitors with 144 hz etc or 1440 p resolution they goway up in price almost a thousand dollars over twice the price as this monitor and i know that you get what you pay for but i also need to justify that cost as well and i dont think spending that much money right now is in my best interest. also considering that i wanna get rid of the tv as a monitor asap even while im using my old system and a gtx680 with a i5 2320 would not handle a 144hz or a 1440p monitor. if i choose to upgrade a monitor later that would be fine. i also use the monitor and pc to watch movies alot. gaming is only about 10% of my pc usage but i like decent games and wanna play more and more. so maybe 20 percent about 50% of the time on the pc right now is watching something youtube, movies, tv shows etc. rest is browsing facebook and twitter etc.

i choose the 9700k because i wanted some future proofing. i bought the i5 2320 6 years ago and it is only recently that i have wanted to upgrade with getting into some higher demanding games. while i know the 2600x would be great for awhile i think the 9700k would last alot longer. and i dont wanna keep replacing it all the time considering they keep changing sockets like its underwear meaning i have to change mobo and cpu and im sure ddr5 will be the new standard soon so ill have to replace that as well. same with the 1660ti yes i agree the 2060 is abit better according to user bench its about 18% faster. and about 20-25% more expensive but im just not sure if i need that much power for the next 5-6 years considering ive been using a 680 since it came out. and its still not at 100% usage my hdd is always at 100% which is what sparked this upgrade. yes in the meantime im getting a ssd until i decide what to do with this new build but i still think a massive rebuild is necessary im satisfied with the amount of years i have gotten out of it. i just wanna find the sweet spot between performance and cost. having watched alot of llt and jayztwocents etc seems the 9700k is second in line right in under the 9900k which is first. yea there are even higher cpus but they are not even something i would consider.

the psu was put at the hx750 for one simple reason its efficiency and when it kicks in its fans.
and according to the manual for the 750 @ about 20% the start of the peak is about 91% efficiency which is about 150 watts and at 50% load which is about 375 watts its at its highest peak 93% efficiency. so i was thinking that my daily usage without gaming so facebook youtube chrome etc running i might use 150 watts, but when getting into heavy gaming etc i might reach into the 300s which is all right at its peaks also leaves me with headroom if i choose to add other parts in the future. also with the fact that the psu fan doesnt turn on until 300 watts thats great for db levels. pcpart picker suggest my estimated watt usage would be around 388 watts which i dont think i will ever peak that but still will be within the most efficiency curve of that psu with lots of head room.

for the ram the reason is i wanted to use the dual channel feature with some future proofing. i know i could do 2x8gb right now and it will be fine but seeing as things are getting way to much in demand of ram and its only seems to be getting worse i think it might be wise to fork out the little bit extra for the 2x16 gb sticks and be good for the 5-6 years.

the 250$ for fans is purely for looks i love how the noctua brown and beige looks and i have always said to fill as many holes as i can. it will be overkill lol but maybe that might mean i can keep the rpms way down to keep the noise down as well. the fan controller is for the same purpose i wanted to have a fan controller with only 4 fan options and this was the best one i could find. i like the fact that i dont need to open a program to ramp up some fans. the rest of the fans will be plugged into the mobo and be set to auto with at the lower end of the temps be almost turned off and then when it reaches a certain temp it goes way up. that way while browsing the internet etc it will be quiet same with watching movies it will be quiet. i wanted some color without some bright lights all the time so the noctua colors i like and with the tuf yellow ish color and the rest being all black i think it would look good as long as i do the cable management right and not screw it up. so while i think it is probably a waste of money i like the color and the rubber on the edges for vibration noise and im not a huge fan of chinese knock offs or non brand (cheap) named things.
does that make more sense now or should i still change things.
 
Here's my take on the above system build. I would allocate budget of many hardware components listed above to other areas of the build to make performance count:

PCPartPicker Part List
CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($507.75 @ Vuugo)
CPU Cooler: Noctua - NH-D15S 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler ($99.95 @ Amazon Canada)
Motherboard: Asus - TUF Z390-PLUS GAMING (WI-FI) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($226.99 @ Mike's Computer Shop)
Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($190.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: ADATA - XPG SX8200 Pro 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($218.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($98.89 @ Amazon Canada)
Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($633.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Power Supply: Corsair - TXM Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Canada Computers)
Monitor: Acer - Predator XB241YU 23.8" 2560x1440 165 Hz Monitor ($544.13 @ Amazon Canada)
Custom: Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (Purchased For $139.99)
Total: $2761.66
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-21 10:24 EDT-0400


Things i've changed:
  1. Memory - The system can be upgraded to 32gb in the future. If you were to purchase now most of the system memory would be idle (not used). The above kit is fast at cas latency 14 and supports higher frequency/bandwidth for this platform.
  2. The Adata XPG 8200 Pro out performs the 970 Evo and is a great value for the money.
  3. Monitor - This system has the potential to be a 1440p high refresh rate system so if you're going to invest in a monitor now's the time to make it count. Purchasing a 60hz 1080p monitor now would result in an imbalance in any other future graphics card upgrades.
  4. In a case that already had great air flow potential, id first see if thermals are even an issue before investing that amount of money in premium noctual fans.
  5. Power supply savings can be allocated to other hardware components listed above.
 
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May 20, 2019
37
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Here's my take on the above system build. I would alocate many hardware components listed above to other areas of the build to make performance count:

PCPartPicker Part List
CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($507.75 @ Vuugo)
CPU Cooler: Noctua - NH-D15S 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler ($99.95 @ Amazon Canada)
Motherboard: Asus - TUF Z390-PLUS GAMING (WI-FI) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($226.99 @ Mike's Computer Shop)
Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($190.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: ADATA - XPG SX8200 Pro 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($218.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($98.89 @ Amazon Canada)
Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($633.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Power Supply: Corsair - TXM Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Canada Computers)
Monitor: Acer - Predator XB241YU 23.8" 2560x1440 165 Hz Monitor ($544.13 @ Amazon Canada)
Custom: Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (Purchased For $139.99)
Total: $2761.66
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-21 10:24 EDT-0400


Things i've changed:
  1. Memory - The system can be upgraded to 32gb in the future. If you were to purchase now most of the system memory would be idle (not used). The above kit is fast at cas latency 14 and supports higher frequency/bandwidth for this platform.
  2. The Adata XPG 8200 Pro out performs the 970 Evo and is a great value for the money.
  3. Monitor - This system has the potential to be a 1440p high refresh rate system so if you're going to invest in a monitor now's the time to make it count. Purchasing a 60hz 1080p monitor now would result in an imbalance in any other future graphics card upgrades.
  4. In a case that already had great air flow potential, id first see if thermals are even an issue before investing that amount of money in premium noctual fans.
  5. Power supply savings can be allocated to other hardware components listed above.
the ram is fine the way it is. i dont mind spending more now and then not having to upgrade late why the switch to g skill. i was thinking with the d15s in dual fan mode i would have clearance issue with the ram which is why i went with the lpx. i dont wanna be buying new ram in a year or 2 and then just having to buy a 32 gb kit then anyways meaning wasting the money on the 16 gb kit now. why buy something if i know in a year or 2 i will need to replace it i want it to last 5-6 years with major potential of not needing to upgrade. also 3200 mhz ram is dummed down on intel or amd unless you overclock it. intel suggests 2666 mhz ram and after looking into it i would need to over clock ram and enable xmp. (i dont overclock)

i have not heard of the adata much is it just a chinese knockoff

as for monitor i dont like the look of most monitors that are 144hz that are curved and in the 32 inch range. if you can suggest one that meets all those requirements as well as under 500 canadian. and must be a recognized major brand

the fans are for looks. i like the looks of the noctual brown and beige color.

power supply was picked for the simple fact of my estimated usage and the peak performance of the psu
 
May 20, 2019
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Here's my take on the above system build. I would allocate budget of many hardware components listed above to other areas of the build to make performance count:

PCPartPicker Part List
CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($507.75 @ Vuugo)
CPU Cooler: Noctua - NH-D15S 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler ($99.95 @ Amazon Canada)
Motherboard: Asus - TUF Z390-PLUS GAMING (WI-FI) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($226.99 @ Mike's Computer Shop)
Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($190.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: ADATA - XPG SX8200 Pro 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($218.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($98.89 @ Amazon Canada)
Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($633.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Power Supply: Corsair - TXM Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Canada Computers)
Monitor: Acer - Predator XB241YU 23.8" 2560x1440 165 Hz Monitor ($544.13 @ Amazon Canada)
Custom: Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (Purchased For $139.99)
Total: $2761.66
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-21 10:24 EDT-0400


Things i've changed:
  1. Memory - The system can be upgraded to 32gb in the future. If you were to purchase now most of the system memory would be idle (not used). The above kit is fast at cas latency 14 and supports higher frequency/bandwidth for this platform.
  2. The Adata XPG 8200 Pro out performs the 970 Evo and is a great value for the money.
  3. Monitor - This system has the potential to be a 1440p high refresh rate system so if you're going to invest in a monitor now's the time to make it count. Purchasing a 60hz 1080p monitor now would result in an imbalance in any other future graphics card upgrades.
  4. In a case that already had great air flow potential, id first see if thermals are even an issue before investing that amount of money in premium noctual fans.
  5. Power supply savings can be allocated to other hardware components listed above.
and actually according to userbench mark the adata and the samsung evo plus is the same for specs. plus i dont need a 1tb it is only for system install. all games will be installed on ssd and personal files will be installed on hdd
 
My version of this:
  1. The dual fan NH-D15 since you wanted 2 fans to begin with
  2. Since you said you won't be overclocking i went with a cheaper motherboard that doesn't have features you wouldn't need
  3. Faster RAM for the same price
  4. Samsung SSDs are the best there is in both speed and reliability, no reason to cut corners there if you have the budget.
  5. Your old gpu was a x80 series one. Getting a 1660 ti means dropping into below x60 series which wont last as well as your old GTX 680.
  6. TXM is very good and seemingly very cheap in Canada
  7. A 165hz 2K monitor with Nvidia G-Sync is pretty much the ideal option for high-end gaming currently
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($507.75 @ Vuugo)
CPU Cooler: Noctua - NH-D15 82.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($99.95 @ Newegg Canada Marketplace)
Motherboard: ASRock - Z390 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($144.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Memory: Team - Vulcan 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($195.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($169.99 @ Canada Computers)
Storage: Samsung - 860 Evo 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($199.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($98.89 @ Amazon Canada)
Video Card: MSI - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB Video Card ($689.00 @ Canada Computers)
Power Supply: Corsair - TXM Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Canada Computers)
Monitor: Dell - S2417DG 23.8" 2560x1440 165 Hz Monitor ($549.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Custom: Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (Purchased For $139.99)
Total: $2896.52
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-21 11:06 EDT-0400
 
May 20, 2019
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My version of this:
  1. The dual fan NH-D15 since you wanted 2 fans to begin with
  2. Since you said you won't be overclocking i went with a cheaper motherboard that doesn't have features you wouldn't need
  3. Faster RAM for the same price
  4. Samsung SSDs are the best there is in both speed and reliability, no reason to cut corners there if you have the budget.
  5. Your old gpu was a x80 series one. Getting a 1660 ti means dropping into below x60 series which wont last as well as your old GTX 680.
  6. TXM is very good and seemingly very cheap in Canada
  7. A 165hz 2K monitor with Nvidia G-Sync is pretty much the ideal option for high-end gaming currently
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($507.75 @ Vuugo)
CPU Cooler: Noctua - NH-D15 82.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($99.95 @ Newegg Canada Marketplace)
Motherboard: ASRock - Z390 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($144.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Memory: Team - Vulcan 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($195.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($169.99 @ Canada Computers)
Storage: Samsung - 860 Evo 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($199.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($98.89 @ Amazon Canada)
Video Card: MSI - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB Video Card ($689.00 @ Canada Computers)
Power Supply: Corsair - TXM Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Canada Computers)
Monitor: Dell - S2417DG 23.8" 2560x1440 165 Hz Monitor ($549.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Custom: Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (Purchased For $139.99)
Total: $2896.52
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-21 11:06 EDT-0400
i questioned and pondered between the d15 and the d15s i wasnt sure if i would have clearance issues with the gpu. seeing as the only real major difference is that the d15s is offset and only comes with one fan but is compatiable with 2.
once again i want to keep all major parts with rgb from the same brand and in the same color scheme black/grey so that i can choose all other colors.
from my knowledge (very little) the 9700k will only natively support 2666 mhz ram unless you overclock the ram and enable xmp which i wont overclock. also is there any clearance issues im told with the d15/d15s you need under 32mm ram if your running 2 fans.
the video card i keep going back and forth. i agree the 1660ti is not going to last as long as the 680 did but i also dont know if i can justify almost 700$ canadian for a 2070

as for monitor i want 32 inch curved, does not have any look of a gaming monitor i want it to look like a normal monitor with some capabilities of gaming. i only game about 10-20% of my time on the pc. so buying a 500-600 dollar monitor might not be worth it if its just for gaming purposes and does not really benefit anywhere else.

power supply i wanted more than 80+ gold and fully modular. i know i spend more on it. but i personally think that a psu is not somewhere you skimp on. considering ive had psus in the past take my own entire system i wont chance it anymore.
 
Piggybacking off of Finstar:
PCPartPicker Part List
CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor ($405.95 @ Vuugo)
Motherboard: Asus - TUF X470-PLUS GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard ($169.99 @ Memory Express)
Memory: Team - Vulcan 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($195.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($169.99 @ Canada Computers)
Storage: Samsung - 860 Evo 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($199.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($98.89 @ Amazon Canada)
Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($633.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Power Supply: Corsair - TXM Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Canada Computers)
Monitor: Samsung - CH711 32.0" 2560x1440 60 Hz Monitor ($549.99 @ Canada Computers)
Custom: Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (Purchased For $139.99)
Total: $2664.76
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-21 11:35 EDT-0400


This would be my choice coming close to the requested curved 32 inch 1440p panel and budget. AMD is the clear winner.
 
i questioned and pondered between the d15 and the d15s i wasnt sure if i would have clearance issues with the gpu. seeing as the only real major difference is that the d15s is offset and only comes with one fan but is compatiable with 2.
once again i want to keep all major parts with rgb from the same brand and in the same color scheme black/grey so that i can choose all other colors.
from my knowledge (very little) the 9700k will only natively support 2666 mhz ram unless you overclock the ram and enable xmp which i wont overclock. also is there any clearance issues im told with the d15/d15s you need under 32mm ram if your running 2 fans.
the video card i keep going back and forth. i agree the 1660ti is not going to last as long as the 680 did but i also dont know if i can justify almost 700$ canadian for a 2070

as for monitor i want 32 inch curved, does not have any look of a gaming monitor i want it to look like a normal monitor with some capabilities of gaming. i only game about 10-20% of my time on the pc. so buying a 500-600 dollar monitor might not be worth it if its just for gaming purposes and does not really benefit anywhere else.

power supply i wanted more than 80+ gold and fully modular. i know i spend more on it. but i personally think that a psu is not somewhere you skimp on. considering ive had psus in the past take my own entire system i wont chance it anymore.
I made some modifications to my list:
  1. returned to the original RAM
  2. Swapped the 2070 for the cheaper 2060 which is nearly as fast but quite a lot cheaper.
  3. EVGA Supernova P2 650W. It's based on the Super Flower Leadex platinum platform which is about as good as it gets when it comes to somewhat reasonably priced PSUs.
  4. The monitor i ignored for now as i just couldn't find good ~32 inch panels that were less than $500.
Ideally you'd want to have at least 2k resolution on such a big display, otherwise the image will look very pixelated and unnatural.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($507.75 @ Vuugo)
CPU Cooler: Noctua - NH-D15 82.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($99.95 @ Newegg Canada Marketplace)
Motherboard: ASRock - Z390 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($144.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory ($196.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($169.99 @ Canada Computers)
Storage: Samsung - 860 Evo 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($199.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($98.89 @ Amazon Canada)
Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING OC Video Card ($469.99 @ Memory Express)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA P2 650 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($179.99 @ Memory Express)
Custom: Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (Purchased For $139.99)
Total: $2208.52
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-21 11:53 EDT-0400
 
May 20, 2019
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I made some modifications to my list:
  1. returned to the original RAM
  2. Swapped the 2070 for the cheaper 2060 which is nearly as fast but quite a lot cheaper.
  3. EVGA Supernova P2 650W. It's based on the Super Flower Leadex platinum platform which is about as good as it gets when it comes to somewhat reasonably priced PSUs.
  4. The monitor i ignored for now as i just couldn't find good ~32 inch panels that were less than $500.
Ideally you'd want to have at least 2k resolution on such a big display, otherwise the image will look very pixelated and unnatural.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($507.75 @ Vuugo)
CPU Cooler: Noctua - NH-D15 82.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($99.95 @ Newegg Canada Marketplace)
Motherboard: ASRock - Z390 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($144.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory ($196.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($169.99 @ Canada Computers)
Storage: Samsung - 860 Evo 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($199.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($98.89 @ Amazon Canada)
Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING OC Video Card ($469.99 @ Memory Express)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA P2 650 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($179.99 @ Memory Express)
Custom: Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (Purchased For $139.99)
Total: $2208.52
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-21 11:53 EDT-0400
yea the corsair psu i can get for 149.99 on sale or 174.99 regular but the evga is 209.99 regular idk about sale price. is there any difference. (links attached below)
as for gpu i can get a asus 1660ti for 466.99 or a msi 1660ti for 429.99 depending on which mobo i go with (msi or asus considering previous comment from another person on here.)
the rtx 2060 is about a hundred dollars more than the 1660ti once again i know id get about 18% more performance but do i need it???? (18% according to userbenchmark)

as for monitor trust me i would love a 32inch curved 1440p 144 hz monitor that didnt look like a dogs .... and never cost me arm and a leg. but its not that way so i have to deal with what i can get.
this is all great input. from everyone on here what do you think about the asus tuf board or would you prefer the MSI gamin edge z390 for both. im torn between them at this point. they both support led lights from other manufactures. asus is a 3fan design for gpu where as the msi for the 1660ti is a 2 fan design, i want to stay with same manufacture for mobo and gpu so that i dont need 2 programs to run all the different rgb lights. i also wanna stay within the black grey theme besides my noctua fans lol which people really seem to dislike those colors (brown and beige)

https://www.amazon.ca/EVGA-SuperNOVA-PLATINUM-Warranty-220-P2-0650-X1/dp/B010HWDPKW/ref=asc_df_B010HWDPKW/?tag=googleshopc0c-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=292968375828&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=14645164681326926482&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9000899&hvtargid=pla-494462262675&psc=1
https://www.amazon.ca/Corsair-CP-9020137-NA-Platinum-Performance-Supply/dp/B01N6PEBNL/ref=asc_df_B01N6PEBNL/?tag=googleshopc0c-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=292954337233&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=17205517050896691040&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9000899&hvtargid=pla-570502570210&psc=1
 
May 20, 2019
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thanks all for the input i have decided on most of it. if you choose to answer any more question about my build look for the other questions i have posted.
 
...plus i dont need a 1tb it is only for system install. all games will be installed on ssd and personal files will be installed on hdd
If you have a dedicated system drive just for the OS (and applications I assume?) then you probably won't need for it to be 500GB. It's unlikely that Windows 10 and your applications alone will even amount to 100GB, so a drive around 250GB would likely be plenty. It seems like a bit of a waste to have several hundred gigabytes of higher-end SSD storage sitting around unused, and the money saved could be put toward other components, like the graphics card, that could actually provide some performance benefit.
 
May 20, 2019
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If you have a dedicated system drive just for the OS (and applications I assume?) then you probably won't need for it to be 500GB. It's unlikely that Windows 10 and your applications alone will even amount to 100GB, so a drive around 250GB would likely be plenty. It seems like a bit of a waste to have several hundred gigabytes of higher-end SSD storage sitting around unused, and the money saved could be put toward other components, like the graphics card, that could actually provide some performance benefit.
i plan on just putting os on it but i might also put some of the big most played games on it if there is any major difference in speed plan on trying it out. im not sure if there is a major difference in pricing between a 250 and a 500 gb?
 
May 20, 2019
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$135 for a 256 $190 for a 500gb thats not a massive big deal. and the 500gb according to userbenchmark is 20% faster than the same model of it in the 250 gb version.
 

Gmoney06ss

Reputable
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Price difference between a 250 and 500, could be up to $70USD. And being that you plan on putting games on a separate ssd, using the boot drive for larger more played games, won't net you a huge difference in loading times. It would IMO be negligible. That could be money used elsewhere.

Odd your seeing a speed difference between a 250 and 500 of the same line, my guess is difference in the memory controller.
 

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