Question New PC . MY COOLING is good?

Jun 18, 2019
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Hi I have a new PC, and my CPU heat about 60 C when I start the pc.
I'm not sure if my build is good I would like to hear your opinion.
This is what I got right now :
View: https://imgur.com/z4yf1xZ

This is what i thought to change to:
View: https://imgur.com/F5JC0Pe

My gear :
CPU : AMD RYZEN 3700X
CPU Cooler: AMD PRIZMA (stock)
RAM :16x2 Crosair 3200MHZ
Graphic Card: GIGABYTE 2070 XTREME
Case : Sharkoon Pure Steel

I was thinking to change to CPU cooler to this options:
noctua NH-U12A (throw the air to the side , 15.8 cm Height )
noctua NH-D14 (throw the air to the side , 15.8 cm Height )
be quiet CPU cooler dark rock tf (throw the air to the window . 13cm Height )

My case limit is 16 cm. what do you think the best option for me ?

I am video editor and use a lot the Adobe Suit.
I live in hot place about 40-42C in the summer .
I need your help to get best cooling for my computer.

*Liquid cooling its not option.
 
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gameoverman2016

Commendable
Sep 6, 2017
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Hi, I am no pro, but 60c is a tad high for startup. I often read people say start up and idle temps dont matter as much as load temps.

What, might I ask, is your temps when at full usage like in games and what not?
 
with decent cooling you should startup and idle <40° and max out <70°.
even with a nice overclock on CPU, GPU, and RAM you shouldn't be idling that high.

that is not a good design for a case. it may look kind of cool but it really limits your options for any type of decent cooling. i would recommend returning it if that is still an option.

you should have more air coming in from the front and bottom streaming across your hardware. and slightly less air exhausting out of the rear and top. this will create a slight positive pressure that when setup correctly will be drawing more cool air in and still force enough warm air out of the case.

your best option may be to have air pulling in from side and rear and pushing out through the bottom. though this isn't a good solution because heat always rises. also the air coming from the side is just bypassing your hardware and exiting straight out of the bottom.

the stock AMD cooler is okay for basic builds but for any type of heavy processing system you want a better 3rd party cooler, whether air or liquid.
 
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Jun 18, 2019
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with decent cooling, you should startup and idle <40° and max out <70°.
even with a nice overclock on CPU, GPU, and RAM you shouldn't be idling that high.

that is not a good design for a case. it may look kind of cool but it really limits your options for any type of decent cooling. i would recommend returning it if that is still an option.

you should have more air coming in from the front and bottom streaming across your hardware. and slightly less air exhausting out of the rear and top. this will create a slight positive pressure that when set-up correctly will be drawing more cool air in and still force enough warm air out of the case.

your best option may be to have air pulling in from side and rear and pushing out through the bottom. though this isn't a good solution because heat always rises. also, the air coming from the side is just bypassing your hardware and exiting straight out of the bottom.

the stock AMD cooler is okay for basic builds but for any type of heavy processing system, you want a better 3rd party cooler, whether air or liquid.
Hi, thank you for your response.
Unfortunately, I can't change the case right now, and I need to understand what the best configuration I can get from this case. I attached 2 photos that you can pay attention to and let me know what do you think I should do with the fans, and which 3rd party cooler should I take?
BE QUIET or Noctua?
So just to make sure, Do you think that I should have the Noctua or the Be Quiet?
Do you support the side option or the rear option?
 

gameoverman2016

Commendable
Sep 6, 2017
63
3
1,545
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Hi thank you for the respond,
While I play WarZone COD MW its possible to arrive about 85 c

Hey there. That is a bit warm. I actually had a thread similar to yours going, as I was seeing 85C in my Fallen order and The Division 2. I just fixed it.


2 things I did,

1. I removed all thermal paste from my cpu and aio and reapplied it and made sure my cooler was placed correctly.

2. I made sure all fans were in a pull push config. Pull from front and bottom, push through back and top, so air is going over my ssd and gpu and excess heat is leaving the case.


Before I redid my pc fans and cooler



after




Settings are maxed at a 3440x1440 resolution. I only noticed the temps as I bought a evo plus 970, so I was watching temps for it when I noticed everything else was getting hot.



Hope this helps.


Also as for fans, the picture below is how I have mine setup(I added red arrows to your picture)




my case is a 9 year old Thermaltake Mk1 Chaser, which some say isnt great for air flow, I personally love the case, and it works for me.


Try cleaning the fans if you havent already as for the noctura, never used one but read all good things, but in your case, that will be a tight fit, possibly too big, considering the motherboard and cpu it goes on will already take up an inch or 3.
 
I attached 2 photos that you can pay attention to and let me know what do you think I should do with the fans
this is already answered in my previous post.
which 3rd party cooler should I take?
BE QUIET or Noctua?
So just to make sure, Do you think that I should have the Noctua or the Be Quiet?
they both make equally good coolers.
your decision should then be based on price and which color scheme best fits your system.
Be Quiet's Dark Rock series are great and have a nice solid black on black theme going for them.
Noctua's best air coolers have some of the best fans on the market included with them but mostly come in their signature cream/tan color on silver.
 
Also as for fans, the picture below is how I have mine setup(I added red arrows to your picture)
this case they're working with has no front or top vents.
in your case, that will be a tight fit, possibly too big, considering the motherboard and cpu it goes on will already take up an inch or 3.
motherboard + CPU takes up ~1/2 of an inch unless you have unbelievably long motherboard standoffs.
this Sharkoon case states it can can house up to a 160mm CPU cooler. most of the best air coolers are just around that size.
 
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rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
The image is VERY difficult to see anything of importance. Also, what do the 'inside' and 'outside' labels with arrows mean?

What fans are being used? Odd that someone who relies on a PC for work in video editing and other tools would choose RGB fans instead of other choices.

Before doing anything else, follow these steps to test:

Airflow / Fan / Cooling / Overheating - How to test, steps to resolve

This could be caused by a few different things, please don't automatically assume 'the cooler is not working' without also checking if the case airflow is sufficient.

Remove the side panel of the PC case. Orient a house fan (desk or box style fan) to blow air into the case, directly over components at the highest setting.

This will represent a case with the best possible airflow possible. For reference, the fans I am providing as examples would look like the items below (just to clarify for anyone who might want reference)



Re-test as you have normally done - play games, run benchmarks, etc. to get to where temperatures were normally seen to be higher than they should. Normal room temperature is usually between 20-24C or 68-75F. Please note that every air or liquid cooler operates as a product of delta-T over ambient, meaning that if the PC is operational (simply turned on), it is impossible for the CPU to display a temperature below ambient room temperatures. If it is, this is likely a bug in software temperature reporting either from the desktop UI or the BIOS reading it incorrectly.

With the fan running at full speed, if temperatures drop by 5-7C or more, case airflow is one major issue to contend with. You will need additional fans or better fans for your setup in order to optimize air in and out of the chassis. This might even require consideration for a new PC case or leaving the side panel partially open during sessions of heavier computing until these items are corrected.

If your temperatures remain relatively the same (difference less than 1-2C), then you likely have an issue with the cooler in question (if CPU is hot, CPU cooler, if GPU is hot, GPU cooler). It would be good to then approach the next steps by thoroughly cleaning the cooler with compressed or canned air and ensuring there are not large blockages in cooling fins or on fans, etc. This might require the cooling fans to be removed from the heatsink or radiator to ensure there is not a buildup of pet hair, dust or even carpet fibers which can trap additional debris. Please ensure the PC is turned off and unplugged during this process to prevent unwanted startup to keep fingers safe from fan blades or accidental shorting if you happen to drop a screw onto other components during fan removal.

Removal of the cooler and re-application of thermal paste & re-seating the cooler can also be beneficial once cleaning of the cooler is ruled out by retesting the steps above.
 
Reactions: gameoverman2016
Jun 18, 2019
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The image is VERY difficult to see anything of importance. Also, what do the 'inside' and 'outside' labels with arrows mean?

What fans are being used? Odd that someone who relies on a PC for work in video editing and other tools would choose RGB fans instead of other choices.

Before doing anything else, follow these steps to test:

Airflow / Fan / Cooling / Overheating - How to test, steps to resolve

This could be caused by a few different things, please don't automatically assume 'the cooler is not working' without also checking if the case airflow is sufficient.

Remove the side panel of the PC case. Orient a house fan (desk or box style fan) to blow air into the case, directly over components at the highest setting.

This will represent a case with the best possible airflow possible. For reference, the fans I am providing as examples would look like the items below (just to clarify for anyone who might want reference)



Re-test as you have normally done - play games, run benchmarks, etc. to get to where temperatures were normally seen to be higher than they should. Normal room temperature is usually between 20-24C or 68-75F. Please note that every air or liquid cooler operates as a product of delta-T over ambient, meaning that if the PC is operational (simply turned on), it is impossible for the CPU to display a temperature below ambient room temperatures. If it is, this is likely a bug in software temperature reporting either from the desktop UI or the BIOS reading it incorrectly.

With the fan running at full speed, if temperatures drop by 5-7C or more, case airflow is one major issue to contend with. You will need additional fans or better fans for your setup in order to optimize air in and out of the chassis. This might even require consideration for a new PC case or leaving the side panel partially open during sessions of heavier computing until these items are corrected.

If your temperatures remain relatively the same (difference less than 1-2C), then you likely have an issue with the cooler in question (if CPU is hot, CPU cooler, if GPU is hot, GPU cooler). It would be good to then approach the next steps by thoroughly cleaning the cooler with compressed or canned air and ensuring there are not large blockages in cooling fins or on fans, etc. This might require the cooling fans to be removed from the heatsink or radiator to ensure there is not a buildup of pet hair, dust or even carpet fibers which can trap additional debris. Please ensure the PC is turned off and unplugged during this process to prevent unwanted startup to keep fingers safe from fan blades or accidental shorting if you happen to drop a screw onto other components during fan removal.

Removal of the cooler and re-application of thermal paste & re-seating the cooler can also be beneficial once cleaning of the cooler is ruled out by retesting the steps above.
First of all, there are more photos with flash.
View: https://imgur.com/xwfBvL9

View: https://imgur.com/vGWEDWv

View: https://imgur.com/IB5oI9l

View: https://imgur.com/BwWT0be

Inside means, air come inside the case outside means air going outside from the case.
the direction of the airflow.
About the RGB thing, 4 of them I got together with the case and I didn't change them.
My big question is if I do change the CPU cooler.
Should I get Noctua or Be Quiet!
Noctua advantageous:
  • HQ fans
  • Push the air to the side and to the window.
Noctua disadvantage:
Too big, could hurt the airflow?
Be Quite advantageous:
Good size. not too big
Be Quiet disadvantage:
push the air to the window.
So I still not get a good answer, Should I change the airflow of the other fan's direction?
If I change the CPU cooler, Should I get the Noctua, push the air to the side and big, or should I get be quiet and push the air to the window and small?
 

Phaaze88

Splendid
Ambassador
1)You've got side exhaust - that's wrong. Should be side intake. Flip those fans around.

2)The bottom-front fan isn't needed. It'll only serve to disrupt the side intake.

3)It's not visible, but the power supply should be fan down.

4)The only reason to change the cpu cooler is for lower noise levels. The stock cooler performs pretty good otherwise.
 
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almost all of the best coolers, including the best Noctua and Be Quiet models, will be pushing air towards the rear of the case in their default configuration.
so this would mean the rear fan would need to be pulling air out of the case.

both manufacturers produce quite a few different models that vary in size and design.
you haven't listed any particular models you are interested in so no one can give you any specific advice on which to get.


more about current fan configuration:
i would definitely set the side panel fans as intake,
i would remove the two bottom fans closer to the front,
have the fan directly under the GPU as intake,
and have the rear fan pulling air out of the case.

removing the two bottom fans will help cut some noise and they are not contributing much anyway.
with your limited exhaust option, having 5 fans pulling air in creates unneeded positive pressure that can force pockets of warm air that do not get expelled as efficiently.

if your PSU is turned fan down, it will be pulling warm air from the case into itself and expelling it through it's own rear vent.
though this will help some with case exhaust, it will also add heat to your PSU which should be avoided.

there are vents in the front of the PSU shroud that could pull some cool air in from the front of the case.
so having the PSU fan facing up could in fact help draw this cooler air directly into the PSU.
i would experiment and see how hot it gets with the fan facing down. if noticably hot, then try facing up.
 
Last edited:
Jun 18, 2019
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1)You've got side exhaust - that's wrong. Should be side intake. Flip those fans around.

2)The bottom-front fan isn't needed. It'll only serve to disrupt the side intake.

3)It's not visible, but the power supply should be fan down.

4)The only reason to change the cpu cooler is for lower noise levels. The stock cooler performs pretty good otherwise.
1) I notice that too, I will flip them.
2)It's better to take it off completely?
3)The power fan doing fine and the fan push the air down.
4)Are you sure that stock cooler = Noctua U12A?
A lot of benchmarks show different results.
 
Jun 18, 2019
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almost all of the best coolers, including the best Noctua and Be Quiet models, will be pushing air towards the rear of the case in their default configuration.
so this would mean the rear fan would need to be pulling air out of the case.

both manufacturers produce quite a few different models that vary in size and design.
you haven't listed any particular models you are interested in so no one can give you any specific advice on which to get.


more about current fan configuration:
i would definitely set the side panel fans as intake,
i would remove the two bottom fans closer to the front,
have the fan directly under the GPU as intake,
and have the rear fan pulling air out of the case.

removing the two bottom fans will help cut some noise and they are not contributing much anyway.
with your limited exhaust option, having 6 fans pulling air in creates unneeded positive pressure that can force pockets of warm air that do not get expelled as efficiently.

if your PSU is turned fan down, it will be pulling warm air from the case into itself and expelling it through it's own rear vent.
though this will help some with case exhaust, it will also add heat to your PSU which should be avoided.

there are vents in the front of the PSU shroud that could pull some cool air in from the front of the case.
so having the PSU fan facing up could in fact help draw this cooler air directly into the PSU.
i would experiment and see how hot it gets with the fan facing down. if noticably hot, then try facing up.
Hi,
I did list specific models, I'll put them here again.

Noctua NH-U12A (throw the air to the side, 15.8 cm Height )
Noctua NH-D14 (throw the air to the side, 15.8 cm Height )
be quiet CPU cooler dark rock tf (throw the air to the window . 13cm Height )


What do you think instead of taking 2 of the fans outside? about flip them and to make a better cooling for the GPU?
View: https://imgur.com/2Dn2U6I


I'm looking for solution for my CPU situation.
its arrive at 94c
and about 65 to 70 c when I use the chrome to write this response.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Your fans are all backwards. Literally. The bottom fans aren't sucking gpu exhaust, the gpu fans are intake, so the bottom fans are stealing air from the gpu. Think! Heat rises. You want bottom fans as intakes, top fans as exhausts. Push heat towards the top of the case. The rear fan should be exhaust. The side fans should be intake if using a tower cooler, puts air in front of the cooler fan. Can be exhaust with a downdraft or area fan like the stock Prism.

This puts a lot of air into the case on the lower right corner, you won't need the fans spinning very fast. The rear exhaust will be doing a lot of work, so it'll be running fast, but that's normal.

You want air FLOW, a stream of air moving through the case, not just AIR shoved in. Air moving in-out will take heat with it, and supply cooler air and increase the range of ability opf the cpu/gpu cooler
 
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I did list specific models, I'll put them here again.
Noctua NH-U12A (throw the air to the side, 15.8 cm Height )
Noctua NH-D14 (throw the air to the side, 15.8 cm Height )
be quiet CPU cooler dark rock tf (throw the air to the window . 13cm Height )
ah, i didn't notice them in your original post.

i would go for the be quiet! Dark Rock 4 + get a another 120mm Silent Wings 3 fan to attach. besides being a great cooler, the black on black will look many times better with the rest of your system.
i would actually go for the Dark Rock 4 Pro, but there's a risk it's a few mm too tall for your case.

the Noctua NH U12A is also an awesome choice. the color is the only thing that always kept me away from Noctua in the past. now though they have very nice chromax.black or grey fans that you can replace the original diarrhea colored fans with.

the Dark Rock 4 + the addition fan will turn out being close to the same price as the NH U12A.

but the Noctua states a 6 year warranty, where the be quiet! states only a 3 year warranty.
i've dealt with be quiet! support with out of warranty products in the past and have never had a problem getting replacement parts and the quickest/most helpful support ever. that is the main reason why i stick with their products for a lot of components over 10+ years.
 
What do you think instead of taking 2 of the fans outside? about flip them and to make a better cooling for the GPU?
i don't get what you mean by "taking 2 of the fans outside". you do not want any of your fans mounted on the outside of the case.

as i stated previously,
more about current fan configuration:
i would definitely set the side panel fans as intake,
i would remove the two bottom fans closer to the front,
have the fan directly under the GPU as intake,
and have the rear fan pulling air out of the case.

removing the two bottom fans will help cut some noise and they are not contributing much anyway.
with your limited exhaust option, having 5 fans pulling air in creates unneeded positive pressure that can force pockets of warm air that do not get expelled as efficiently.
 
Last edited:
Jun 18, 2019
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ah, i didn't notice them in your original post.

i would go for the be quiet! Dark Rock 4 + get a another 120mm Silent Wings 3 fan to attach. besides being a great cooler, the black on black will look many times better with the rest of your system.
i would actually go for the Dark Rock 4 Pro, but there's a risk it's a few mm too tall for your case.

the Noctua NH U12A is also an awesome choice. the color is the only thing that always kept me away from Noctua in the past. now though they have very nice chromax.black or grey fans that you can replace the original diarrhea colored fans with.

the Dark Rock 4 + the addition fan will turn out being close to the same price as the NH U12A.

but the Noctua states a 6 year warranty, where the be quiet! states only a 3 year warranty.
i've dealt with be quiet! support with out of warranty products in the past and have never had a problem getting replacement parts and the quickest/most helpful support ever. that is the main reason why i stick with their products for a lot of components over 10+ years.
Unfortunately, I can't take the Dark rock. It's too tall for my case.
with the U12A I use 15.8mm from 16mm.
But the question is, Because of the size of it, Is it hurt the airflow in the case or no?
this is the reason I consider the:
be quiet CPU cooler dark rock tf (throw the air to the window . 13cm Height )

because he shorter.
 
Jun 18, 2019
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ah, i didn't notice them in your original post.

i would go for the be quiet! Dark Rock 4 + get a another 120mm Silent Wings 3 fan to attach. besides being a great cooler, the black on black will look many times better with the rest of your system.
i would actually go for the Dark Rock 4 Pro, but there's a risk it's a few mm too tall for your case.

the Noctua NH U12A is also an awesome choice. the color is the only thing that always kept me away from Noctua in the past. now though they have very nice chromax.black or grey fans that you can replace the original diarrhea colored fans with.

the Dark Rock 4 + the addition fan will turn out being close to the same price as the NH U12A.

but the Noctua states a 6 year warranty, where the be quiet! states only a 3 year warranty.
i've dealt with be quiet! support with out of warranty products in the past and have never had a problem getting replacement parts and the quickest/most helpful support ever. that is the main reason why i stick with their products for a lot of components over 10+ years.
i don't get what you mean by "taking 2 of the fans outside". you do not want any of your fans mounted on the outside of the case.
as i stated previously,
i don't get what you mean by "taking 2 of the fans outside". you do not want any of your fans mounted on the outside of the case.
I meant to remove them from the case completely.
I'm try to make it clear to make sure that I understand your explain
 
Unfortunately, I can't take the Dark rock. It's too tall for my case.
with the U12A I use 15.8mm from 16mm.
But the question is, Because of the size of it, Is it hurt the airflow in the case or no?
this is the reason I consider the:
the Dark Rock 4 is just under 160mm and will fit in your case. it's the Dark Rock 4 PRO that is a couple mm over 160.
check the Technical Data tab in the Dark Rock 4 link i provided.

and that 160mm measurement is designed to leave a bit of a gap between coolers and the side panel, so you actually could more than likely use a bit greater than 160mm.
i have measured and compared case specs to real life figures many times and >90% of the time there is a bit of room for error in their reported measurements.
if you are unsure get some measuring tape and see what you can determine.

but, in the end it is up to you. you should be doing your own research and going with what best fits your idea of a good layout, not just doing what others recommend. it always seems to give a bit more satisfaction knowing that the end result came from your own knowledge and hard work.
 

Phaaze88

Splendid
Ambassador
1) I notice that too, I will flip them.
2)It's better to take it off completely?
3)The power fan doing fine and the fan push the air down.
4)Are you sure that stock cooler = Noctua U12A?
A lot of benchmarks show different results.
2)Yeah. Whether you make the side fans intake or exhaust, it won't really be doing anything.
3)No. You've got the idea of that wrong. It's great that you've got it fan down in the case though.
The psu fan is pulling air through and out the back - it's not pushing air into the case. The psu is essentially another exhaust.

4)I didn't say that at all. The stock cooler is good, but some people find it noisy.
Were those cooler benchmarks using other Ryzen 3000 cpus? If they were not, they may as well be invalid. These cpus do not behave in the same manner as Intel's, nor it's older Ryzen cousins.
In fact, they have more in common with Nvidia's gpus; boost clock potential is determined by available power and thermal headroom.
The NH-U12A, you may discover isn't cooling significantly better than the stock cooler, but it looks that way because the stronger cooler allowed the cpu to reach slightly higher core frequencies. Although, that also increases power consumed...
That was probably confusing - I apologize. I don't exactly have the best way with words...
I'll try to simplify it:
The stock cooler for the 3700X is pretty good, but due to the cpu's 'unique' behavior, other coolers appear underwhelming. It's more worthwhile to replace it if you find it to be too loud.
 
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the Dark Rock 4 is just under 160mm and will fit in your case. it's the Dark Rock 4 PRO that is a couple mm over 160.
check the Technical Data tab in the Dark Rock 4 link i provided.

and that 160mm measurement is designed to leave a bit of a gap between coolers and the side panel, so you actually could more than likely use a bit greater than 160mm.
i have measured and compared case specs to real life figures many times and >90% of the time there is a bit of room for error in their reported measurements.
if you are unsure get some measuring tape and see what you can determine.

but, in the end it is up to you. you should be doing your own research and going with what best fits your idea of a good layout, not just doing what others recommend. it always seems to give a bit more satisfaction knowing that the end result came from your own knowledge and hard work.
I understand.
Thank you for your time and response during the discussion, I think I will take or the dark pro or the U12A the build is similar.
 
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2)Yeah. Whether you make the side fans intake or exhaust, it won't really be doing anything.
3)No. You've got the idea of that wrong. It's great that you've got it fan down in the case though.
The psu fan is pulling air through and out the back - it's not pushing air into the case. The psu is essentially another exhaust.

4)I didn't say that at all. The stock cooler is good, but some people find it noisy.
Were those cooler benchmarks using other Ryzen 3000 cpus? If they were not, they may as well be invalid. These cpus do not behave in the same manner as Intel's, nor it's older Ryzen cousins.
In fact, they have more in common with Nvidia's gpus; boost clock potential is determined by available power and thermal headroom.
The NH-U12A, you may discover isn't cooling significantly better than the stock cooler, but it looks that way because the stronger cooler allowed the cpu to reach slightly higher core frequencies. Although, that also increases power consumed...
That was probably confusing - I apologize. I don't exactly have the best way with words...
I'll try to simplify it:
The stock cooler for the 3700X is pretty good, but due to the cpu's 'unique' behavior, other coolers appear underwhelming. It's more worthwhile to replace it if you find it to be too loud.
In my job the sound of the computer, not a factor, because most of the time I use headphones with noise-cancelling or big monitors as speakers.
I just look for a good CPU cooler that I can trust that won't lead to crash.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Amd and Intel are competition. They've been arguing for far too many years as to which way is better. Intel settled on performance over temps, if the cpu says 4.4GHz turbo, that's what you get, but you better have a good cooler or temps skyrocket into the 90's. So naturally AMD does it backwards to that design and favor temps over performance. The 3700x Will boost to 4.4GHz, if you have the cooler for it, if you don't, when temps hit above 70ish, you get 4.3GHz. If temps would hit 80ish, it'll only boost to 4.2GHz etc. Intel doesn't care if you cook the cpu, AMD does.

So if you get temps of 80ish with the Prism, you're likely about 4.1-4.2 GHz. The Noctua NH U12S is a superior cooler and when seeing temps of 80ish,your cpu is more likely at 4.3-4.4GHz instead.

It's a different way of looking at things. AMD will continue boosting upto maximum as long as temps are OK, Intel will downclock if temps are not ok (ok according to Intel, not you)
 

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