Question New router or higher internet speed?

Jan 3, 2020
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I am noticing an issue recently with my wifi speed. I have 100mbps through my isp. I have a d-link dir-868l provided by my isp. I have 3 wired connections which get the full 100mbps. I have about 19 devices connected via wifi. 14 of which are connected 2.4ghz and the rest on 5ghz. 5ghz i get about 60-90mpbs depending on where i am in the house and 2.4ghz i get only about 20-40mpbs upstairs and downstairs.

My question is should i upgrade my router or internet speed. I notice a big drop off of speed upstairs on 2.4ghz while the 5ghz for the most part holds steady. I do have a few dead zones in the house upstairs but does not impact as those zones where no one really is.

My house is about 2500sq ft.
 
5 GHz typically has a much shorter range and is faster (Higher bandwidth).
2.4 GHz has a much longer range and is slower (Lower bandwidth).

You have a lot of devices on the poor little 2.4GHz. Even AC won't help if you try to stream a few videos on that channel.

If your house has unused Coax wall jacks in the house, I would consider a MOCA adapter connected to an AP upstairs, in the opposite corner of the house.

If you get a repeater relay, you may improve signal strength, but your overall performance will drop due to increased ping time due to the relaying. You aren't solving the inherent congestion issue, just the signal strength.
 
Jan 3, 2020
11
0
10
0
5 GHz typically has a much shorter range and is faster (Higher bandwidth).
2.4 GHz has a much longer range and is slower (Lower bandwidth).

You have a lot of devices on the poor little 2.4GHz. Even AC won't help if you try to stream a few videos on that channel.

If your house has unused Coax wall jacks in the house, I would consider a MOCA adapter connected to an AP upstairs, in the opposite corner of the house.

would this help? UniFi AP-AC-LR as a wireless access point?
If you get a repeater relay, you may improve signal strength, but your overall performance will drop due to increased ping time due to the relaying. You aren't solving the inherent congestion issue, just the signal strength.
would 2 routers help relieve that issue? divide the devices between the 2?

I do have coax wall jacks that are not used. Like the ones that the old TVs used to use right? sorry i am not really familiar with things like this. if that is what you are talking how could I use that to help with the speed and signal?
 
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would 2 routers help relieve that issue? divide the devices between the 2?

I do have coax wall jacks that are not used. Like the ones that the old TVs used to use right? sorry i am not really familiar with things like this. if that is what you are talking how could I use that to help with the speed and signal?
Wifi signal strength is based on frequency and distance. The higher the frequency, the shorter distance it will go. But the data rate will be less.

Access points are BY FAR the best way to expand and improve your wifi coverage. You can just purchase an AP to double the number of 2.4GHz channels. This will help with bandwidth if they are set up properly. The features of a second router wouldn't be necessary.

But placement is crucial. It would be best placed at the opposite corner of your house on floor 2. Unfortunately an AP must be connected via a traditional LAN cable. As most people loathe running plenum Cat 6 ethernet cable in their walls, manufacturers came up with an "easier" solution. MOCA and PowerLine adapters. It works like this:

Router LAN Port (Ethernet port)-> LAN Cable -> MOCA Adapter -> Coax Cable Port (floor 1)->
(Goes through coax wiring in house) ->
Coax Cable Port (Floor 2)-> MOCA Adapter->LAN Cable->Access Point LAN PORT (Ethernet port).

It sounds complicated, but it's actually quite simple to set up.

PowerLine adapters work in a similar way, except they use your home power lines. PowerLine adapters work, but are horrid at speed. Don't expect anywhere near the claimed speeds. I'm lucky to get 20mbps with some rooms.

https://www.amazon.com/Motorola-Adapter-Ethernet-2-Pack-MM1002/dp/B078HMDDVS/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=MOcA+adapter&qid=1579031449&sr=8-3
 
Jan 3, 2020
11
0
10
0
Wifi signal strength is based on frequency and distance. The higher the frequency, the shorter distance it will go. But the data rate will be less.

Access points are BY FAR the best way to expand and improve your wifi coverage. You can just purchase an AP to double the number of 2.4GHz channels. This will help with bandwidth if they are set up properly. The features of a second router wouldn't be necessary.

But placement is crucial. It would be best placed at the opposite corner of your house on floor 2. Unfortunately an AP must be connected via a traditional LAN cable. As most people loathe running plenum Cat 6 ethernet cable in their walls, manufacturers came up with an "easier" solution. MOCA and PowerLine adapters. It works like this:

Router LAN Port (Ethernet port)-> LAN Cable -> MOCA Adapter -> Coax Cable Port (floor 1)->
(Goes through coax wiring in house) ->
Coax Cable Port (Floor 2)-> MOCA Adapter->LAN Cable->Access Point LAN PORT (Ethernet port).

It sounds complicated, but it's actually quite simple to set up.

PowerLine adapters work in a similar way, except they use your home power lines. PowerLine adapters work, but are horrid at speed. Don't expect anywhere near the claimed speeds. I'm lucky to get 20mbps with some rooms.

https://www.amazon.com/Motorola-Adapter-Ethernet-2-Pack-MM1002/dp/B078HMDDVS/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=MOcA+adapter&qid=1579031449&sr=8-3
okay I am following you soo far only question I have is. If at the other end of the adapter on floor 2 i can plug in the AP in the LAN port and connect to the 2.4ghz or the 5ghz connection.

I would get full speed with this upstairs or would there a speed cut to my devices? Also, would you be able to recommend any AP devices to go for?

Would this be more cost effective vs like a mesh wifi system? (eero, Google wifi, Orbi, velop)
 
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okay I am following you soo far only question I have is. If at the other end of the adapter on floor 2 i can plug in the AP in the LAN port and connect to the 2.4ghz or the 5ghz connection.

I would get full speed with this upstairs or would there a speed cut to my devices? Also, would you be able to recommend any AP devices to go for?

Would this be more cost effective vs like a mesh wifi system? (eero, Google wifi, Orbi, velop)
The closer you are to your wireless transmitter, the faster you will go. That's why I suggested the opposite corner of your house, to ensure you have at least 1 clean signal from either your router on floor 1 or the AP on floor 2.

HOWEVER most modern router/AP sets will AUTOMATICALLY assign you to the one with the strongest signal. They will even switch you if you travel from floor to floor. This is called "Auto handoff" But the standard for all this to work isn't fully "baked" between brands. So if you have a netgear router, stay with a netgear AP. Asus router, stay with Asus AP. Unfortunately you'll have to read both manuals to see if they support automated handover. Otherwise you'll have to switch your connection by hand just like a wifi-repeater.

Auto-handoff is the strength of MESH systems. But they are just nothing more than slightly more fancy wifi repeaters that auto handoff to the strongest station. They charge you a lot for convenience while delivering questionable performance.

This video should help you understand:

View: https://youtu.be/qoWqb_bbo3A


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