[SOLVED] New Ryzen build, Win 10 1903 nightmare

dejectedpanda

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Hey,
I picked up a R5 1600 + MSI B450 Pro-Vdh Plus + 2x8GB HyperX RAM a few days back to replace my old 2500K system. Plugged it in and it booted right into Windows (1809), no reinstall needed. Ran my games and some benchmarks w/o any issues.

Then I decided to install a fresh copy of 1903 and its been nothing but freezes, reboots and BSODs ever since. So far I've got BSODs for rt640x64.sys, dpc watchdog violation and kmode exception not handed. I've installed all the latest drivers from my board's page but no luck.

Also, when I try creating a bootable USB with any previous version of Windows, Media Creation Tool fails at around 50% whereas Rufus outright crashes the PC or gives me this error. I've also got a bunch of USB device not recognized errors even though the drive in question works fine at other times.

Running sfc /scannow throws the "Windows Resource Protection found corrupt files but was unable to fix some of them" error. Even ran the DISM command but it didn't help.

Best part is I managed to install Steam and get my previously installed copy of Just Cause 3 working. Ran it for about half an hour, no problems. But use Chrome/Edge or other apps like Photos, and it randomly freezes/restarts when its not stuttering and lagging like hell.

What driver or fix do I have to use to solve this? Will going back to 1809 or even 1803 help? I am at my wits end trying to find a solution and I could really use some help.

PS: Even though its tied to my MS account, my Pro retail key doesn't work anymore when I try reactivating it using the Troubleshooter.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator

dejectedpanda

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rt640x64.sys - realtek lan drivers (from memory) - I was right. Latest on board website is July 30, its likely the same version you would find here - https://www.realtek.com/en/component/zoo/category/network-interface-controllers-10-100-1000m-gigabit-ethernet-pci-express-software

try making installer on a pc that works?

you would need to talk to microsoft about the activation of the Retail key. If its a 10 key, it should work
Yeah, I installed the latest LAN drivers from my board's support page and that particular BSOD hasn't happened since.

On someone else's suggestion, I installed one RAM module at a time and haven't crashed so far. But the thing is both of them seem to work fine when installed separately in each slot so not sure which stick is faulty, if one of them is indeed faulty.

Anyway, I was able to create 3 bootable drives for 1607, 1709 and 1803. I'll try reinstalling one of them and see if it fixes the issue. Otherwise, I'll just return the RAM.

Yes, it is a Windows 10 key Pro Retail key. When I try reactivating it via the Troubleshooter, it says its unable to activate Windows. When I try entering the key itself, it says the key is already in use. I'll try talking to them once I get my system stable.

Thanks.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
are they part of a set of just 2 x 8gb sticks sold separately, as no guarantee 2 diff sticks work together unless they matched.

Try running memtest86 on each of your ram sticks, one stick at a time, up to 4 passes. Only error count you want is 0, any higher could be cause of the BSOD. Remove/replace ram sticks with errors.
 

dejectedpanda

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are they part of a set of just 2 x 8gb sticks sold separately, as no guarantee 2 diff sticks work together unless they matched.

Try running memtest86 on each of your ram sticks, one stick at a time, up to 4 passes. Only error count you want is 0, any higher could be cause of the BSOD. Remove/replace ram sticks with errors.
I thought I was buying a kit but the seller sent two identical sticks instead. There's a difference of 129 between the last 4 digits of their serial numbers.

I just installed Windows 10 1607. I'll use the PC for a bit and see if its still crashing. Will run memtest86 in some time. Anyway, I am thinking of sending the modules back and getting either a refund or an actual kit.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
I thought I was buying a kit but the seller sent two identical sticks instead. There's a difference of 129 between the last 4 digits of their serial numbers.

I just installed Windows 10 1607. I'll use the PC for a bit and see if its still crashing. Will run memtest86 in some time. Anyway, I am thinking of sending the modules back and getting either a refund or an actual kit.
Yes, I would return sticks and ask for what you thought you were getting. mismatched sticks can make perfectly good drivers corrupt. Hence the lan drivers above,
 

dejectedpanda

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Yes, I would return sticks and ask for what you thought you were getting. mismatched sticks can make perfectly good drivers corrupt. Hence the lan drivers above,
Update: Tested both sticks individually with Memtest86 and they both passed the standard 4 pass test with zero errors. And the system works fine when running them separately in either slot. Its only when I run them both together that these issues crop up. I don't know if its the RAM or the board that's faulty now.

Also, reseated the CPU/cooler, checked all the connections and cables, everything seems in order. CPU is idling at 33 degrees and doesn't cross 60 even at full load so its not temp issues either.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
they not same types of stick, the difference in the coding might be enough to set system off

are the sticks on the Motherboard QLV list? Ryzen systems can be picky about ram, especially if its the wrong ram.

I would be more inclined to get ram replaced with a set and only then worry about the motherboard.
 

dejectedpanda

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they not same types of stick, the difference in the coding might be enough to set system off

are the sticks on the Motherboard QLV list? Ryzen systems can be picky about ram, especially if its the wrong ram.

I would be more inclined to get ram replaced with a set and only then worry about the motherboard.
They are identical sticks but not a kit. Like I said, the product page lists them as a kit but they aren't.

Yes, the sticks are on my board's QVL. Its the reason I purchased them over faster 3000MHz parts which aren't on the QVL.

Today I got a wpprecorder.sys BSOD when I was running one of the modules alone, following which the PC rebooted and started installing Windows updates. I'm really not sure what's going on anymore tbh.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
thats a file i not seen before. wpprecorder.sys - WPP Trace Recorder https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/drivers/devtest/wpp-software-tracing

files that hardly ever crash popping up makes me think its ram still. As i said, it can make perfectly good drivers report errors. longer you run it, more drivers will be reported. replacing perfectly good drivers gets you nowhere.

Without randomly replacing motherboard and seeing if fixes it, I would be more tempted to get a repair store to test it. They are likely to have ram sticks they know work, that they can swap in, just to test if it causes BSOD with 2 sticks in. This way you find out if its ram or motherboard.
 

dejectedpanda

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have you flashed the bios since getting it?

That could also be reason for errors as most new ones make ram work better. DOn't get latest as its still a beta -

https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/support/B450M-PRO-VDH-PLUS#down-bios

this video shows how to update bios -


I should have thought of bios before now.
Sadly, the motherboard already came updated with the most recent stable BIOS (7A38v95).

You are most probably right about the sticks having compatibility issues with each other or the board having problems running dual channel. Cause I tried the Memory Try It feature in the BIOS just for the heck of it and am able to run 2933 CL 16-18-18 with one of the sticks w/o crashing so far. Even ran Just Cause 3 for about half an hour, no issues. Its just that for whatever reason they don't work together. I really hope its the RAM and not the board.

Btw, thanks a lot for all your replies. Much appreciated.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I don't see any mention of what slots they are installed in, and yes, it makes a big difference in some cases. On some boards more than others, and to varying degrees, but on all boards in general. They SHOULD be installed in the second and fourth slots over from the CPU socket.

If they are not in those slots, move them to those slots, do a hard reset of the BIOS, and try again.

BIOS hard reset procedure


Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.


If they still have problems, then try bumping the memory voltage UP by .005-.020v in the BIOS, save settings, exit.

If they STILL don't want to play nice together, then it is likely due to them not coming from the same kit. What is the exact model of these sticks and what speed are they configured for?

Have you tried setting the XMP profile in the BIOS? If you mentioned that already, I missed it.
 
Reactions: Colif

Aeacus

Glorious
Herald

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
While it's totally possible for the disparity in coming from different production runs rather than in the same kit, to be the problem, if the sticks have speeds and timings that are within the JEDEC envelope for that platforms default support, it makes it a lot less likely. Even disparate sticks, when they are below 2666mhz, for DDR4, will USUALLY still work together but they might take a lot more tweaking and fiddling with settings to get them to do so. It still won't be in every case.

For example, you can get two different sticks with the exact same part number, that have very few similarities and major differences, as seen here:

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/amd-ram-compatibility.3210050/#post-19785792
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
op asked for two matching sticks, he thought he was getting a matching pair, it was the seller who is responsible for the sticks he received not matching.

I appreciate all the help, I just wanted to check it wasn't just a voltage thing, hence DB 1st post. Now we wait :)
 

dejectedpanda

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@Colif
So just as I was about to return the sticks, I said to hell with it, plugged the second stick in, went into the BIOS and selected the 3200MHz CL 16-18-18 preset in Memory Try It and manually set the voltage to 1.35V. Its working so far. Also, in the meantime, Windows decided to update to 1809 (I had installed 1803) which incidentally was the version I was on before all this nonsense started. Ran Witcher 3, Just Cause 3 plus CineBench w/o any problems so far. Not quite sure what to make of all this.

@Darkbreeze
Thanks for the detailed info. As mentioned above, I am now running 3200MHz@1.35V. Do you think the voltage bump is the reason for the current stability? Btw, I ran Thaiphoon Burner and turns out these sticks are Nanya Technology as opposed to SK Hynix which is what's shown on the QVL list. More misinformation I wasn't aware.

@Aeacus
You're right about buying kits but like I've mentioned a couple of times already, I thought I was buying a kit but the seller sent separate sticks instead.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Were your sticks already in the 2nd and 4th slots, or did you have to move them there? Or are they not in those slots, still?

If it works in the "memory try it", then it should work with the XMP profile for those sticks, and that's what you want to run them at because "try it" is BS. Manufacturers should know better. Anything beyond (Lesser settings is ok, higher settings, not ok, at all, ever, without extensive testing) the XMP profile requires extensive stability testing. It doesn't matter if it "seems" ok. Usually, it's not. Not without a good amount of tweaking of primary and secondary timings, voltage adjustments, adjustments to other board features like SOC, system agent voltage, VCCIO, etc. to bolster the memory controller and DRAM configuration.

What is the actual part number for those sticks? If you don't know, you can install CPU-Z and look on the SPD tab. Select one of the slots that memory is installed in from the drop down menu and the part number field will be populated with that information.
 

dejectedpanda

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Were your sticks already in the 2nd and 4th slots, or did you have to move them there? Or are they not in those slots, still?

If it works in the "memory try it", then it should work with the XMP profile for those sticks, and that's what you want to run them at because "try it" is BS. Manufacturers should know better. Anything beyond (Lesser settings is ok, higher settings, not ok, at all, ever, without extensive testing) the XMP profile requires extensive stability testing. It doesn't matter if it "seems" ok. Usually, it's not. Not without a good amount of tweaking of primary and secondary timings, voltage adjustments, adjustments to other board features like SOC, system agent voltage, VCCIO, etc. to bolster the memory controller and DRAM configuration.

What is the actual part number for those sticks? If you don't know, you can install CPU-Z and look on the SPD tab. Select one of the slots that memory is installed in from the drop down menu and the part number field will be populated with that information.
My sticks were already in the 2nd and 4th slot to begin with, like I've always installed RAM. I also tested them in the 1st and 3rd slots, but never in single channel mode.

Yeah, the XMP profiles should work, but for some reason they don't when run together whereas the Try It preset does. And I didn't modify any voltages except bumping DRAM voltage to 1.35V. All sub timings are on auto as well. I ran the default Memtest86 4 pass test and it completed without any errors in a little over 3 hours. They also pass the test individually at their rated 2400MHz speed.

The part number is KHX2400C15/8G, manufacturer is Nanya Technology, single rank (even though the spec sheet says its dual) and the manufacturing week/year is 25/19.

This is my first AMD build so all these memory compatibility issues are a bit new to me. I've never had issues like this with any of my Intel builds, even when mixing RAM sticks from different manufacturers and manually overclocking them. I've got another couple of days before the return window closes so I'll be testing them as much as I can. What other tests would you recommend to verify their stability?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I'd return them, now, and order a matched set from a more reputable seller or site if that's possible. If you can't, then you might want to give the Ryzen calculator a go.

The memory stablity test procedure is right there in my guide that Aeacus linked you to earlier. Also, below.

Testing your memory configuration to verify stability

Before you decide that this section is not worth your time or get lazy thinking you don't need to test because you you're system "seems" fine, with no obvious blue screens, freezing or restarting, let me make one thing VERY, VERY CLEAR.

ANY amount of instability in your memory configuration is enough to cause what are known as micro errors. This is a very miniscule error which, if it only happened one time might not ever be a factor but when it happens cumulatively in small increments over time, can result in complete and total corruption of your operating system, documents, game files, applications, music, movies, everything, to the point of being a complete and total loss with no chance of recovery.

Memory configurations that are not as close to 100% stable as possible are not a joke. They WILL eventually cause widespread corruption of the entire file system. Don't cut corners because it's simply not worth it. If you are unwilling to do the testing necessary to make sure the system is stable you should simply leave the memory at the default configuration and that includes NOT setting the memory to the XMP profile if the profile of the memory is beyond what the system automatically configures the memory speed and timings to by default. Do the testing. One day out of your life is not going to kill you but not doing it might make you wish you had died if you lose a lot of very important information and personal files that can't be replaced.



Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.

Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86 (NOT Memtest86+, that is a different, older version and is outdated). Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


Click here to download Memtest86 USB package

Create a bootable USB Flash drive:


1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP or custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.

After your memory will pass Memtest for 4 full passes, it is still not necessarily stable, but it is a good start and you should move on the the last phase of testing using Prime95. See, there IS a light at the end of the tunnel.




Final testing with Prime95

It is highly advisable that you do a final test using Prime95 version 26.6 or the latest version WITH AVX and AVX2 disabled, and run a custom configured Blend test. You can also use the Blend mode option as is, but after a fair amount of personal testing, asking questions from some long time members with engineering level degrees that have forgotten more about memory architectures than you or I will ever know, and gathering opinions from a wide array of memory enthusiasts around the web, I'm pretty confident that the custom option is a lot more likely to find errors with the memory configuration, and faster, if there are any to be found.

Please note as this is rather important, if you prefer, or have problems running version 26.6 because you have a newer platform that doesn't want to play nice with version 26.6, you can use the latest version of Prime95 with the Custom test selected but you will need to make the following change.

In the bottom of the Torture test selection popup menu there will be some options for disabling AVX. I recommend that you do so, not because we are doing thermal testing and require a steady state workload (Which AVX wouldn't affect anyhow, as Computronix explained to me), but because the last thing you need during memory testing is having to worry about CPU temperatures, and you will, with AVX enabled.

So, uncheck the option for AVX2. That will un-gray the option for AVX, and uncheck that box as well.

Now open Prime95.

Click on "Custom". Input a value of 512k in the minimum FFT size field. Leave the maximum FFT size field at 4096k. In the "Memory to use" field you should take a look at your current memory allocation in either HWinfo or system resource monitor. Whatever "free" memory is available, input approximately 75% of that amount. So if you currently have 16GB of installed memory, and approximately 3GB are in use or reserved leaving somewhere in the neighborhood of 13GB free, then enter something close to 75% of that amount.

So if you have 13GB free, or something reasonably close to that, then 75% of THAT would be 9.75GB, which, when multiplies times 1024 will roughly equal about 9984MB. You can average things out by simply selecting the closest multiple of 1024 to that amount just to keep it simple, so we'll say 10 x 1024= 10240mb and enter that amount in the field for "Memory to use (MB)". We are still well within the 13GB of unused memory BUT we have left enough memory unused so that if Windows decides to load some other process or background program, or an already loaded one suddenly needs more, we won't run into a situation where the system errors out due to lack of memory because we've dedicated it all to testing.

I've experienced false errors and system freezes during this test from over allocating memory, so stick to the method above and you should be ok.


Moving right along, do not change the time to run each FFT size.Leave that set to 15 minutes.

Click run and run the Custom test for 8 hours. If it passed Memtest86 and it passes 8 hours of the Custom test, the memory is 100% stable, or as close to it as you are ever likely to get but a lot of experts in the area of memory configuration suggest that running the extended Windows memory diagnostic test is also a pretty good idea too.

If you get errors, (and you will want to run HWinfo alongside Prime95 so you can periodically monitor each thread as Prime will not stop running just because one worker drops out, so you need to watch HWinfo to see if there are any threads not showing 100% usage which means one of the workers errored and was dropped) then you need to either change the timings, change the DRAM voltage or change the DRAM termination voltage, which should be approximately half of the full DRAM voltage.

There are also other bios settings that can affect the memory configuration AND stability, such as the SOC, VCCIO and system agent voltages, so if you have problems with stability at higher clock speeds you might want to look at increasing those slightly. Usually, for Intel at least, something in the neighborhood of 1.1v on both those is pretty safe. There are a substantial number of guides out there covering those two settings, but most of them are found within CPU overclocking guides so look there in guides relevant to your platform.

As a further measure of assurance that your WHOLE configuration is stable, you can download and run Realbench for 8 hours. If the system freezes or fails when running Realbench with your full memory amount set, try running it again but select only half your amount of installed memory.
 

Aeacus

Glorious
Herald
Yeah, the XMP profiles should work, but for some reason they don't when run together whereas the Try It preset does. And I didn't modify any voltages except bumping DRAM voltage to 1.35V. All sub timings are on auto as well. I ran the default Memtest86 4 pass test and it completed without any errors in a little over 3 hours. They also pass the test individually at their rated 2400MHz speed.

The part number is KHX2400C15/8G, manufacturer is Nanya Technology, single rank (even though the spec sheet says its dual) and the manufacturing week/year is 25/19.
KHX2400C15/8G is not the real part number. It's what whichever software you use to identify it says it to be. To know the real part number, read it from the sticker on the RAM. Or better yet, take a picture of your RAM with it's part number sticker clearly visible and share that pic with us.

For example:
I'm running two sets of HX430C15SB2K2/8 RAM in my Skylake build (full specs with pics in my sig) and if i use software to identify my RAM, it comes back as KHX3000C15D4/4GX. Put the latter number into Google and what you get as a result is HyperX Predator 4x 4GB (16GB) set, who's actual part number is HX430C15PB2K4/16.

For a software, both RAM configurations are same: KHX3000C15D4/4GX = K (Kingston), HX (HyperX series), 3000 (3000 Mhz), C15 (CAS Latency 15), D4 (4GB stick), /4GX (times four). But in reality, they are completely different RAM sets with different timings.

So, what you have is either: HX424C15FB/8 (dual-rank) or HX424C15FB2/8 (single-rank).

Here, i'm with Darkbreeze and i'd also return both sticks and get a set. Also, if you want your RAM to run in 3000 Mhz, buy the 3000 Mhz set. Don't OC your 2400 Mhz RAM to 3000 Mhz since that speed is not what that RAM was designed to operate at.
Also, from Kingston:
All Kingston products are tested to meet our published specifications. Some motherboards or system configurations may not operate atthe published HyperX memory speeds and timing settings. Kingston does not recommend that any user attempt to run their computers faster than the published speed. Overclocking or modifying your system timing may result in damage to computer components.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I'm not sure I've PERSONALLY seen anybody damage their hardware by overclocking the RAM, so long as it was within reason, but I've sure as hell seen plenty of occasions where somebody's ENTIRE file system was so corrupted because they had overclocked the memory by 200-400mhz, or tightened down the timings, didn't test for stability, and six months down the road every part of the operating system PLUS most of their personal documents and files, were irreparably corrupted beyond recovery.

And that is without even factoring in the potential for random major errors that are hard to pin down as far as what exactly is causing them. Doesn't have to be a freezing or blue screening mess to simply bork things up.

Now, if they're overclocking the memory and using memory voltage that is beyond spec for the platform, then that's a different story, and can absolutely cause damage to the CPU/Memory controller or motherboard. Or the memory itself in extreme circumstances.
 

Aeacus

Glorious
Herald
I'm not sure I've PERSONALLY seen anybody damage their hardware by overclocking the RAM, so long as it was within reason, but I've sure as hell seen plenty of occasions where somebody's ENTIRE file system was so corrupted because they had overclocked the memory by 200-400mhz, or tightened down the timings, didn't test for stability, and six months down the road every part of the operating system PLUS most of their personal documents and files, were irreparably corrupted beyond recovery.

And that is without even factoring in the potential for random major errors that are hard to pin down as far as what exactly is causing them. Doesn't have to be a freezing or blue screening mess to simply bork things up.

Now, if they're overclocking the memory and using memory voltage that is beyond spec for the platform, then that's a different story, and can absolutely cause damage to the CPU/Memory controller or motherboard. Or the memory itself in extreme circumstances.
Somehow, OP got additional 800 Mhz out of his RAM. I thought that such a high level RAM OC was impossible. I still have hard time believing that 2400 Mhz RAM is running at 3200 Mhz.
As mentioned above, I am now running 3200MHz@1.35V.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
return ram, ask for a matching set like you paid for
when you get it back, test it with that Thaiphoon Burner program and see if it is what it says it is.

i wouldn't buy from people who send you different things to what you pay for... unless its better :)
 

dejectedpanda

Commendable
Oct 3, 2016
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@Aeacus
Sorry, yeah its HX424C15FB2/8. It was right there on the box, I just didn't see. But what I had actually ordered was HX424C15FBK2/16.

I'm having a hard time believing they can do 3200MHz myself, but it passed another round of Memtest86 and whatever other games/benchmarks I've thrown at it so far. Here's my CPU-Z validation. And this guy has had a similar experience with probably the same model - Nanya die Ryzen overclocking.

@Darkbreeze
DRAM voltage is 1.35V (shows 1.344V in the BIOS) and SOC voltage is 1.05V (fluctuates a bit around that value), which are within safe specs, aren't they? When I initially selected the 3200 preset, it bumped DRAM voltage to 1.36V and SOC voltage to 1.156V, but I brought them down to the aforementioned values and re-ran Memtest86 successfully. All other voltages seem to be unaltered.

The data corruption bit is a real worry though and the reason why I'll most probably be sending them back. Even though I have important data backed up, its not worth losing GBs worth of random data just for a little more speed.

Anyways, since I am able to run these sticks at well above their rates speeds, can I at least rule out my motherboard and CPU as likely culprits? Or should I try replacing them as well? Would be relief if I don't have to return the board since that's the only thing I didn't buy on Amazon and would require me to ship it back myself.

@Colif
Like I mentioned above, I had ordered HX424C15FBK2/16 but I received HX424C15FB2/8 instead. Even the CS rep that I chatted with said I should return it. Its just sad this crap happens on Amazon too.

Anyway, after nearly 3 days of troubleshooting hell, I am just pleasantly surprised they can go so high. Think this is the first time I've ever won any kind of silicon lottery. :p But I'll almost certainly be sending them back.
 
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