Question New SSD works with USB but not internal Sata connection

Jan 6, 2022
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HI there,

I've got an ASUS GLV502VY That has a small SSD as Drive C boot drive with Windows 10 installed, and a 1TB spinning hard drive as Drive D for data. I want to replace drive D with a 1TB Sony SSD.

I connected the Sony Samsung SSD with a USB cable in order to partition and format the drive (NTFS). That worked fine. I then opened the case, pulled out the spinning drive and plugged in the SSD drive and restarted. Restart failed--the screen displayed the ASUS ROG logo and hangs. There is no way to get to BIOS from here.

I removed the SSD and tried restarting (with only the C drive installed) and all was well. I reinstalled the original spinning drive and startup was normal again. I swapped out the spinning drive for the SSD once again, and startup failed in the same way--ASUS ROG logo appeared on screen and froze with no way out except to force shutoff by holding down power key.

Next, I pulled out the SSD, restarted with Drive C only, and booted in to Windows--now I tried installing the SSD in to the internal plug while everything was running, to see if it was acknowledged by Windows but it was not. Tried restarting with it still plugged in but same failure--stuck at logo.

One last double-check: connected SSD to SATA/USB cable and connected it by USB. It was immediately recognized by Windows as Drive D and I was able to write test files to it.

I'm concluding that the internal SATA connections work (since there is no problem with the spinning drive installed), and the drive works since it's fully functional when connected by USB.

Why would bootup fail with the SSD installed internally? (I never changed any BIOS settings related to boot order).

--Don
 
Last edited:

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Welcome to the forums, newcomer!

Mind sharing a link to the Sony branded SSD? As for your laptop, do you have the latest BIOS version for your laptop? Can you check and see what the Boot Devices listed in your BIOS are?

now I tried installing the SSD in to the internal plug while everything was running, to see if it was acknowledged by Windows but it was not.
You never want to do that unless you want to short the SSD(s) or the laptop's motherboard.

What version of Windows 10 are you working with?
 

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