News New Windows Build Makes it Easy to Change Refresh Rates

Oct 15, 2020
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This is ridiculous; why doesn't Windows read the EDID file from the monitor and set display settings according to that? The refresh rate is included in that, as is colour depth. There's no need to assume 60Hz whatsoever.
 

nofanneeded

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Sep 29, 2019
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so .. it is 2020 and windows still cant make their system auto select the refresh rate following the Monitor hardware specs ?? what? are we in the "plug and Pray" era again ?
 

excalibur1814

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The moment Windows automatically changes the refresh, someone will complain for x or y.


People buy televisions and NEVER change anything from the defaults. But... why? Why can't the TV automatically...
 

InvalidError

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This is ridiculous; why doesn't Windows read the EDID file from the monitor and set display settings according to that? The refresh rate is included in that, as is colour depth. There's no need to assume 60Hz whatsoever.
EDID is used to populate the supported resolution list including refresh rate. Having to manually select refresh rate is a safeguard against hardware issues preventing things from working properly at the maximum supported settings: if you have a flaky DP/HDMI port or cable that cannot quite get there, you end up with an unusable monitor and no simple means to lower settings to get a usable output. By defaulting at 60Hz, you get to manually bump it up and let it time out if it fails for whatever reason.
 
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nofanneeded

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Sep 29, 2019
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EDID is used to populate the supported resolution list including refresh rate. Having to manually select refresh rate is a safeguard against hardware issues preventing things from working properly at the maximum supported settings: if you have a flaky DP/HDMI port or cable that cannot quite get there, you end up with an unusable monitor and no simple means to lower settings to get a usable output. By defaulting at 60Hz, you get to manually bump it up and let it time out if it fails for whatever reason.
The windows driver for selecting the refresh rate can be made dynamic not static ... even if you are using the wrong cable it would detect what refresh rate the monitor is working at.
 
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waltc3

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Aug 4, 2019
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EDID is used to populate the supported resolution list including refresh rate. Having to manually select refresh rate is a safeguard against hardware issues preventing things from working properly at the maximum supported settings: if you have a flaky DP/HDMI port or cable that cannot quite get there, you end up with an unusable monitor and no simple means to lower settings to get a usable output. By defaulting at 60Hz, you get to manually bump it up and let it time out if it fails for whatever reason.
Exactly--read posts daily from people who get a black screen, but can hear the software running, because they experimented with refresh rate outside their monitor's capability just "to see if worked"...;) Monitor sync breaks and they are clueless, floundering around. I can't believe how lazy some people are today about their systems. I insist on setting my settings manually--because that's the only way to know exactly what I've got...;) I'm only surprised that some people aren't complaining that Windows doesn't power on for them via mental telepathy. Takes all kinds, I guess.
 
Reactions: JarredWaltonGPU
Oct 15, 2020
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0
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Having to manually select refresh rate is a safeguard against hardware issues preventing things from working properly at the maximum supported settings: if you have a flaky DP/HDMI port or cable that cannot quite get there, you end up with an unusable monitor and no simple means to lower settings to get a usable output.
Ah - good point. I had not considered people having a dodgy cable or component.
 

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