Newbie question on ADVC300 settings (Chroma filter, compon..

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I finally got enough presidents up to get a Canopus ADVC-300 dv converter
and am installing it today. The PC's all ready to go and s/w's been
installed. I'm a little perplexed about the Chroma filter and "Component
Level" dipswitch settings on the ADVC300. I've searched the Web but haven't
found anything helpful.... yet. I'll be converting NTSC VHS (some SVHS)
tapes to DV via the ADVC300 and an Adaptec Firewire card in the PC. Should
I choose 1.3Mhz or 2Mhz for the Chroma filter? Should I choose SMPTE or
Betacam for "Component Level"?(I'm figuring I don't have a betacam so it'd
be smpte..?) TIA.
---
Tony
 
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In article <HfidnQZUNqRDPeTd4p2dnA@comcast.com>,
"Tony S" <nospam@thanx.not> writes:
> I finally got enough presidents up to get a Canopus ADVC-300 dv converter
> and am installing it today. The PC's all ready to go and s/w's been
> installed. I'm a little perplexed about the Chroma filter and "Component
> Level" dipswitch settings on the ADVC300. I've searched the Web but haven't
> found anything helpful.... yet.
>
For NTSC, it is probably best to choose the 1.3MHz filter. There is little
info between 1.3MHz and 2.0MHz on any normal NTSC composite or S-Video
source.

For the signal level, choose the SMPTE setting. The SMPTE
setting is closer to consumer video component levels (and perfectly
matches my D9 equipment, even though it can also be changed.)

For the 'filters', you'll find that the 3D mode is best used at
the lowest (but enabled) setting except for the most noisy video.
For the most pristine sources, disabling the 3D filter can
be advantageous. The 3D comb (for full composite sources) is usually
the best choice, but some motion artifacting might make the 2D
comb more desireable.

For the 2D NR filters, I find that anything higher than the
lowest level is too severe.

The 'edge enhancement' is mostly too strong, but I have sometimes
used the lowest settings.

For sharpness, I find that the center setting (or slightly lower)
is best.

All in all, my results from the ADVC 300 have been supurb.

John
 
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John, thank you very much for the reply. Who said this wasn't a learning
experience?! ;-)
---
Tony

"John S. Dyson" <toor@iquest.net> wrote in message
news:c5cc7o$2uo9$1@news.iquest.net...
> In article <HfidnQZUNqRDPeTd4p2dnA@comcast.com>,
> "Tony S" <nospam@thanx.not> writes:
> > I finally got enough presidents up to get a Canopus ADVC-300 dv
converter
> > and am installing it today. The PC's all ready to go and s/w's been
> > installed. I'm a little perplexed about the Chroma filter and
"Component
> > Level" dipswitch settings on the ADVC300. I've searched the Web but
haven't
> > found anything helpful.... yet.
> >
> For NTSC, it is probably best to choose the 1.3MHz filter. There is
little
> info between 1.3MHz and 2.0MHz on any normal NTSC composite or S-Video
> source.
>
> For the signal level, choose the SMPTE setting. The SMPTE
> setting is closer to consumer video component levels (and perfectly
> matches my D9 equipment, even though it can also be changed.)
>
> For the 'filters', you'll find that the 3D mode is best used at
> the lowest (but enabled) setting except for the most noisy video.
> For the most pristine sources, disabling the 3D filter can
> be advantageous. The 3D comb (for full composite sources) is usually
> the best choice, but some motion artifacting might make the 2D
> comb more desireable.
>
> For the 2D NR filters, I find that anything higher than the
> lowest level is too severe.
>
> The 'edge enhancement' is mostly too strong, but I have sometimes
> used the lowest settings.
>
> For sharpness, I find that the center setting (or slightly lower)
> is best.
>
> All in all, my results from the ADVC 300 have been supurb.
>
> John