Question Newbie to Overclocking. A few Questions

Oct 18, 2021
7
0
10
0
Hi all, my name is John. I just built my first Rig and I am totally into learning about overclocking. I'm 65 and almost retired and I can see this becoming a labor of love well into my retirement years (along with photography and gaming!!!). First, let me start with my build:

CPU - AMD Ryzen 9 5900x
Mobo - Asus Tuf Gaming x-570 Pro wifi
CPU Cooling - Corsair 115i -RGB platinum (280 mm) - mounted on front as a push intake
RAM - Corsair Vengeance RGB rt 32gb (2 16gb) ddr4 3600mhz C16
Memory - 1) Samsung 980 PRO PCIe 4.0 NVMe® SSD 1TB
2) Samsung 860 EVO 1TB SATA 3 SSD
3) Crutial MX300 2.5 in 500 GB SATA 3 SSD
4) Toshiba external SSD 2 TB USB 3.0
Case - Lian Li Lancool ii Mesh RGB
Graphics - EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 (awaiting prices to drop and availability of the Radeon 6800 xt)
PSU - Enermax Revolution D.F 850W
Monitor - BenQ ex3202r 144 Hz 2k
Case Cooling - 4 Corsair 120mm LL RGB PWM Dual Light Loop fans (2 intakes on bottom, 1 top back, 1 upper back of case) plus the two front 140 mm aio cooler Corsair ML RGB fans

Yes, I made it look pretty but that was important to me!!!

So, I have been reading through the CPU overclocking guide and tutorial for beginners and had some questions. First off I ran Memtest86 for 4 full passes with no errors (at default settings (3200 MHz after clearing CMOS on Asus Mobo)). Now I am ready to start changing clock frequency and voltage.

Question 1 - It says to start at base frequency and increase in small increments. Then it goes on and says to start at base frequency (which is 3.7 Ghz for the 5900x) and increase to the Max-Turbo frequency for a single core (4.8 Ghz for the 5900x) at stock voltage (I couldn't find what that was but I can follow the guide and determine what to set it at). Also, I could not find a setting in the BIOS for "per core" for the CPU Core Ratio. Anyhow, isn't a jump from 3.7 to 4.8 a big jump and not a small incremetal one as initially recommended???

Question 2 - First off, my temperatures jump all over the place which I understand is pretty normal for the AMD CPU's but what I am a little concerned about is my average CCD1 temp is almost 5.5 degrees hotter than the CCD2 after 1 hour of idle use. The cores 6-10 are between 31 and 32 avg (degees C) but Core 11 is up near 39. Cores 0-5 are at 37-40 avg. again at idle. I still see a difference when the system is being stressed although the difference tightens up to about 3 degrees between the CPU CCD1 vs 2 (Tdie) average with 1 again being higher. I also notice the power levels are about 1.5 W greater in Cores 0-5 (CDD1) than 6-11 (CDD2) suring the stability test. I used the stock paste which was preapplied on the Corsair AIO. Is this normal or do I have a cooling problem here??

Thanks for any help and being patient with my ignorance!!
 
I don't know about Memtest86, from what I hear it is not a very good stability tester for RAM. I think I've run that program once, 15 years ago. Here is more up to date things on RAM stability tests and overclocking it. https://github.com/integralfx/MemTestHelper/blob/oc-guide/DDR4 OC Guide.md

All silicon isn't made equal, there is always variation. I expect that is what you are seeing with regards to CCD1 vs CCD2. Ryzen also has 'Preferred core(s)'. Ryzen Master should list which cores those are. Preferred core(s) should be able to clock a little bit higher than the rest.
I don't really care about it. Why? Let's say you are in a race, Ferrari vs Porsche (your cores). Now, the Ferrari(s) might get to the finish line before the Porsches BUT the Ferrari(s) would STILL have to wait on the Porsches to finish for the race to be over (your workload finishes). So what did I gain? 1 core boosting higher than the rest, in a multicore load. I gained nothing. Because that 1 core wont boost higher under a multicore load, that gets turned off. It only works in Singlecore loads, to my knowledge (never trust anything you read on the internet).

Back to OC. Most people tune their PBO2 and CO, Curve Optimizer I think. You have PPT, TDC and EDC. If you run a workload like Cinebench R23 and have Hwinfo64 open, you can see which of those is limiting your CPU from boosting. Usually it is EDC. The limiting factor will sit at 100% in Hwinfo64 out of those three, PPT, TDC, EDC.
Read the first posts Theory-part here to understand more. https://www.overclock.net/threads/understanding-the-sizing-and-limits-of-ppt-tdc-and-edc.1732088/
IIRC, PPT is measured in Watts, the rest in Amps. So a PPT with a value 100 will most likely throttle your CPU. 150-200 shouldn't. Look at Hwinfo64 again, what is CPU PPT sitting at under a heavy workload with PBO at stock?
With my 5600X and 240mm Corsair AIO, I can reach 140 watts before my cooling just gives up and CPU overheats. So I've settled for 120-130 Watts. Mind you, I don't use PBO, at all. I have a static overclock. But that amount of wattage needs dissipating/cooling, no matter what.
TDC I could leave at stock, didn't limit me. But EDC, that was my limiter. From what I've read countless times, EDC seems to work best if it reaches 90-98% or so. You get the best performance. Never 100% but just below it. If you set EDC too high, you might loose performance. Say it sits at 60-70% for example.

When it comes to Curve Optimizer, you can apply a negative offset for all-cores or per core. You will have cores that can do higher negative offsets than the rest. Some might do -5, others -25. For per-core CO, this is a tedious part. You would have to test each core individually, in something like OCCT. I haven't tried this. But the procedure is something like only allowing 1 core, in Windows, to run the OCCT test. You set the Affinity to 1 specific core, the one you are testing the negative offset on. Run the test for like an hour. But do also note, with negative core offset, the cores will usually crash when idle. Something to remember. In other words, you might be fine gaming, running benchmarks etc but as you are idling, system crashes.
With the all-core offset, you would have to settle with the value that the poorest core can run. Start with -5. Then go higher in steps of 3 or 5. Like -8 or -10 etc.

I haven't talked about CPU voltage at all. Well, for this, find out your FIT voltage. Deemed as the safe voltage. For this, reset BIOS to defaults, only enabling XMP and PBO. Run Prime95 smallFFTs and have Hwinfo64 open. Look at CPU core voltage (SVI2 TFN). The lowest value it reaches, that is your FIT voltage. 1-2 minutes of Prime95 should suffice for this.
Now, you have to go into BIOS, set a voltage around that FIT voltage for your CPU. It is not going to be exact. So you have to play with voltage and LLC for CPU.
Let's take an example: My FIT voltage is 1.275v. If I set CPU voltage to 1.275v in BIOS, it's not going to stay there in Prime95. It will go lower. It will 'droop' lower. In order to get it to not droop as much, I have to set LLC to 3. My Asus board has 5 levels, 1-5. 1 being the weakest and 5 being for LN2 ONLY. So I choose to use the middle-of-the-road LLC. Even with that, my voltage drops too low. I might sit at 1.26 volts in Prime95 smallFFT. With 1.275v and LLC 3 set in BIOS. So what I had to do, via trial and error was to increase the voltage, 1 step at a time, til it would droop to 1.275v. Turns out, for me, that was 1.3v and LLC 3, in BIOS. Note:These values, you can't copy them right off. As I said, every silicon is different, different characteristics. And higher core-count CPUs will have to run at lower voltages. You might find your FIT voltage is 1.20v or 1.225v. Perfectly normal.

In terms of vDroop (voltage droop), you want it. Voltage should drop under load. The heavier the load, the lower it will drop. Now, if your voltage goes the other way, increasing with load, that is bad. Avoid it at all costs. Your LLC is too aggressive and might lead to a dead CPU.

When it comes to your initial CPU OC question about frequency. 3700 Mhz vs 4800 Mhz. You know it can run the base clock, no problem. It can boost to 4.8 Ghz. You don't want to waste time and test 3.75 Ghz all-core, then 3.8, 3.85 Ghz and so on. You 'jump ahead'. To something like 4.4-4.5 Ghz. That is how I would do it. Mine only does 4.6 Ghz boost so I started at 4.3 Ghz. And ended up at 4.45 Ghz as final OC. Again, by running Prime95 smallFFT. If a worker-thread fails in Prime95, CPU is unstable. Prime95 wont give you an error box or anything. So keep an eye on those worker threads. Should be a quick test, if you survive for 2 mins, it should be good. Then, increase frequency by 50 Mhz, run Prime95 again. If Prime95 crashes, reduce frequency by 50 Mhz and that is your CPU overclocking done. If you set up your FIT voltage (CPU voltage and LLC) correctly.

One thing to bear in mind. If you are going to do RAM AND CPU overclocking, it is recommended to do the RAM first. Because if you do it the other way around, you might find your stable CPU OC isn't so stable anymore. OC'ed RAM puts an extra strain on the CPU.

You might see terms like vDIMM, vSOC etc. The 'v' stands for voltage. DIMM is your RAM. Some motherboards list DRAM voltage as vDIMM.
Another common thing is stuff like tCL, tRP etc on RAM. 't' stands for time, i think, measured in clock cycles when it comes to RAM. Samsung B-die runs tCL at around 14. But in terms of nanoseconds, that is around 7.7 ns.
Something else that confuses people is the 3200 Mhz, Megatransfers, Megabits. Some programs, I think CPU-Z is one, will list your actual RAM Mhz. And it will be half of that, in this case 1600 Mhz. This is because RAM is DDR, Double-Data Rate. Sends a signal on the High AND Low. So throughput is doubled. The most correct term would probably be Megabits. But no one uses it, especially not RAM manufacturers and their PR firms.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: oldrev
Oct 18, 2021
7
0
10
0
Thank you so much for the detailed reply mamasan2000 (nice user name!!!). I will look this over for a few days, educate myself some more, and replay if I don't understand something.

BTW, regarding Cinebench R23, I am not able to run that. I get an application error message each time so I am using Cinebench R20.
 
Thank you so much for the detailed reply mamasan2000 (nice user name!!!). I will look this over for a few days, educate myself some more, and replay if I don't understand something.

BTW, regarding Cinebench R23, I am not able to run that. I get an application error message each time so I am using Cinebench R20.
R15, 20, 23, doesn't matter, I just picked one. And remember, it is a benchmark, not a CPU stability test as some erroneously think.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: keith12
Oct 18, 2021
7
0
10
0
R15, 20, 23, doesn't matter, I just picked one. And remember, it is a benchmark, not a CPU stability test as some erroneously think.
I have put about 4 hours of research in and have determined that there are as many ways to approach OCing as there are people doing it!!! I did find some great Youtube's by The Graying Tech on PPT, TDC, and EDC and have a much better understanding of what is going on with PBO and autoOC with my processor. I can also clearly see in Ryzen Master which of my cores are the preferred ones plus it is also evident that CCD0 is utilized far more than CCD1 so it makes sense that the temperatures are higher. I find it interesting though that CoreTemp App doesn't show the differences nearly as much as HwINFO64. Also, other AMD users see these differences in CCD0 vs CCD1 temps, and "knowledgeable people" say this is normal.

"what is CPU PPT sitting at under a heavy workload with PBO at stock?" It reads from 142 to 142.9 (100%) so I do understand that this needs to be increased so it is not throttling the CPU. Both TDC and EDC are also at 100% under load. Before I start playing with these variables, I have a few basic questions.
  1. My PBO at stock was what I have after clearing my CMOS so I'm at default mobo settings correct? I do see that at the default settings, I am getting individual core boost's up close to 4900 MHz without load but then they increase to constant levels at 4200 running Cinebench R20 or 4400 with AIDA64. Isn't this PBO already?? Or is this what is meant when they say this processor is unlocked and PBO, autoOC, and Manual OC is going beyond the stock OC that I am getting right out of the box.
  2. I want to work with PBO first before going to Manual OC. Getting ahead of myself a little, PPT, TDC, EDC, and curve optimizer are only adjusted with PBO and not manual OC correct? When and if I mess with a manual all-core OC, I would be changing the CPU Core ratio and voltages as I understand it.
  3. I had to laugh when you stated to OC the memory first because that one is obviously controversial as I've read it both ways from "more knowledgable people". Although I am a newbie, I think I like the OC memory first camp. My memory did pass the OCCT memory and Large AVX2 CPU test. Unfortunately, I did get errors a few weeks ago on a CPU stability test (OCCT or AIDA64 extreme) by just changing my IA Overclock Tuner in BIOS to DOCP (using the full 3600 MHz of my memory instead of 3200 stock) and setting the FCLK to 1800. So these two changes in BIOS with everything else at stock did give me errors when running stability or stress tests. I won't swear to it but I seem to remember on one of the stress or stability tests, the problem was in Core 7. I am going to repeat this part (since I did it a while back) and see what is happening.
Update, at stock settings but changing to DOCP and FCLK to 1800, I did get 1 memory error when testing the memory on OCCT and the CPU crashed at the 9 min mark during the CPU OCCT test. Looks like I need to do some work with the memory. I will start reading about that. My memory is not on the tested Ryzen list for the 9 5900x so I guess there is no guarantee I will get 3600 from the memory.
 
Last edited:
I have put about 4 hours of research in and have determined that there are as many ways to approach OCing as there are people doing it!!! I did find some great Youtube's by The Graying Tech on PPT, TDC, and EDC and have a much better understanding of what is going on with PBO and autoOC with my processor. I can also clearly see in Ryzen Master which of my cores are the preferred ones plus it is also evident that CCD0 is utilized far more than CCD1 so it makes sense that the temperatures are higher. I find it interesting though that CoreTemp App doesn't show the differences nearly as much as HwINFO64. Also, other AMD users see these differences in CCD0 vs CCD1 temps, and "knowledgeable people" say this is normal.

"what is CPU PPT sitting at under a heavy workload with PBO at stock?" It reads from 142 to 142.9 (100%) so I do understand that this needs to be increased so it is not throttling the CPU. Both TDC and EDC are also at 100% under load. Before I start playing with these variables, I have a few basic questions.
  1. My PBO at stock was what I have after clearing my CMOS so I'm at default mobo settings correct? I do see that at the default settings, I am getting individual core boost's up close to 4900 MHz without load but then they increase to constant levels at 4200 running Cinebench R20 or 4400 with AIDA64. Isn't this PBO already?? Or is this what is meant when they say this processor is unlocked and PBO, autoOC, and Manual OC is going beyond the stock OC that I am getting right out of the box.
  2. I want to work with PBO first before going to Manual OC. Getting ahead of myself a little, PPT, TDC, EDC, and curve optimizer are only adjusted with PBO and not manual OC correct? When and if I mess with a manual all-core OC, I would be changing the CPU Core ratio and voltages as I understand it.
  3. I had to laugh when you stated to OC the memory first because that one is obviously controversial as I've read it both ways from "more knowledgable people". Although I am a newbie, I think I like the OC memory first camp. My memory did pass the OCCT memory and Large AVX2 CPU test. Unfortunately, I did get errors a few weeks ago on a CPU stability test (OCCT or AIDA64 extreme) by just changing my IA Overclock Tuner in BIOS to DOCP (using the full 3600 MHz of my memory instead of 3200 stock) and setting the FCLK to 1800. So these two changes in BIOS with everything else at stock did give me errors when running stability or stress tests. I won't swear to it but I seem to remember on one of the stress or stability tests, the problem was in Core 7. I am going to repeat this part (since I did it a while back) and see what is happening.
Update, at stock settings but changing to DOCP and FCLK to 1800, I did get 1 memory error when testing the memory on OCCT and the CPU crashed at the 9 min mark during the CPU OCCT test. Looks like I need to do some work with the memory. I will start reading about that. My memory is not on the tested Ryzen list for the 9 5900x so I guess there is no guarantee I will get 3600 from the memory.
CCD0 has the better cores and AMDs CPPC, the core-selector of course always picks the best cores first. https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/admin-guide/acpi/cppc_sysfs.html

  1. Check if PBO is enabled in BIOS.
  2. Yes, with a manual all-core overclock you don't enable PBO or OC and turn off Core Performance Boost so it doesn't screw up anything. And yes, CPU core ratio which is the frequency. Ratio x Base bus speed (Frontsidebus of old) which is 100 Mhz. So for 4.4Ghz that would be a Core ratio of 44. 44 x 100 = 4400 Mhz. With the other way, you can only enable PBO and play with its limits. No need to touch CO. But you can. AND, this is IMPORTANT! Turn ON Core Performance Boost. CPU might not boost past baseclocks otherwise. Be stuck at like 3.7 Ghz or something.
  3. I did CPU overclock first. Just a habit since I didn't use to OC RAM in years past. I had to lower CPU OC by 50 Mhz after RAM OC. I am not 100% sure it is related but...it could be.
My RAM isn't on my Mobos QVL either. Didn't matter for me. Not only that. My Asus X470 Prime Pro officially only supports 3433 Mhz RAM OC...I've tested the max I can get out of my 3600 Mhz RAM. It boots at 4400 Mhz. But of course that is really poor performance in Aida64 because I can't run 2200 Fclock. So I run it at 1900 Fclock and 3800 Mhz on RAM with tighter timings, tighter than XMP. And since I'm a pro-noob, at 1.55 volts and a 120mm fan over the RAM to keep them cool. Max recommended daily usage voltage. Without a fan it is 1.5v. But I would have to loosen timings. I don't want to do that.

Technically XMP is an overclock, it is not guaranteed to work but most often it does. Probably just needs a bit of extra voltage, 1.38v or so. Slots 2 and 4 on mobo, A2/B2.
I haven't run XMP in years. I do manual OC of RAM as well.
 
Last edited:
Oct 18, 2021
7
0
10
0
Thank you, all well explained. I must be learning because I understood 99 % of that!!! The only statement I am a little confused on is when you say IMPORTANT to Turn on Core Performance Boost. Is that for PBO or Manual OC?
 
Thank you, all well explained. I must be learning because I understood 99 % of that!!! The only statement I am a little confused on is when you say IMPORTANT to Turn on Core Performance Boost. Is that for PBO or Manual OC?
Turn it ON for PBO. For Static overclock, you should turn it off so it doesn't try to boost past your set clocks and crash your system.
 
Oct 18, 2021
7
0
10
0
Turn it ON for PBO. For Static overclock, you should turn it off so it doesn't try to boost past your set clocks and crash your system.
Quick update. I have been playing around with PBO, auto-overclocking, and curve optimization and I think I have my system pretty well dialed in. I am getting over 5000 Mhz on all 12 cores and a score of 22312 (Multicore) on Cinebench R23 (which I finally was able to install with help from Maxon). I was also able to 3600 out of my memory by increasing the DRAM voltage to 1.36 (from 1.35). All of this at a thermal core max of 80 degrees on CCD1 and 76.5 on CCD2.

My best performance was when the EDC was at 119 which was 103% of available. The PPT and TDC fluctuated between 99 and 100% when stressed. If I got the EDC down to 99 percent, my scores dropped into the mid 21K on Cinebench R23 and max frequencies about 4800 MHz. I saw a few other people get similar results on YouTubes with the Ryzen 5900x. I did get better performance if I set PPT, TDC, and EDC to motherboard instead of manual. I went up about 200 on the Cinebench R23 score and about 4 degrees in temp. I assume I am better running at a little lower temps. I did see some people use the motherboard settings on Youtubes so I thought I would try it.

For now, I am going to use the PBO with Auto-overclocking (200 MHz) and Curve Optimization. I did the CO per core which wasn't too bad because 9 of the 12 cores are at -30 so I only had to tweak 3 to get the highest undervolt. Maybe in the future, I will try manual OCing and see how that works out. I have the settings all saved in a profile on my BIOS. Two weeks ago I was freaking out because I had to go into my BIOS. Now I have enough knowledge that I am very comfortable tweaking the BIOS and I have just enough knowledge that I can really do some damage!!!! Lol. Thanks for all your help!!
 
Quick update. I have been playing around with PBO, auto-overclocking, and curve optimization and I think I have my system pretty well dialed in. I am getting over 5000 Mhz on all 12 cores and a score of 22312 (Multicore) on Cinebench R23 (which I finally was able to install with help from Maxon). I was also able to 3600 out of my memory by increasing the DRAM voltage to 1.36 (from 1.35). All of this at a thermal core max of 80 degrees on CCD1 and 76.5 on CCD2.

My best performance was when the EDC was at 119 which was 103% of available. The PPT and TDC fluctuated between 99 and 100% when stressed. If I got the EDC down to 99 percent, my scores dropped into the mid 21K on Cinebench R23 and max frequencies about 4800 MHz. I saw a few other people get similar results on YouTubes with the Ryzen 5900x. I did get better performance if I set PPT, TDC, and EDC to motherboard instead of manual. I went up about 200 on the Cinebench R23 score and about 4 degrees in temp. I assume I am better running at a little lower temps. I did see some people use the motherboard settings on Youtubes so I thought I would try it.

For now, I am going to use the PBO with Auto-overclocking (200 MHz) and Curve Optimization. I did the CO per core which wasn't too bad because 9 of the 12 cores are at -30 so I only had to tweak 3 to get the highest undervolt. Maybe in the future, I will try manual OCing and see how that works out. I have the settings all saved in a profile on my BIOS. Two weeks ago I was freaking out because I had to go into my BIOS. Now I have enough knowledge that I am very comfortable tweaking the BIOS and I have just enough knowledge that I can really do some damage!!!! Lol. Thanks for all your help!!
Run Prime95 smallFFT. Cinebench is a benchmark, can't base much of anything off of it. It's basically a number-of-cores and L3-size comparison. RAM doesn't even matter really. And it's too light to test stability of the CPU or the system.
 
Could try Asus Realbench
There is a test that runs 8hrs and uses half your ram.
Half your RAM isn't enough. And 8 hours is on the too long side.
If you want to test like 90% of your RAM, actually a useful stability test, you should run HCI Memtest at least to 400%, Testmem5 with Anta777 config. There are others, like Karhu Ramtester but I haven't tried those.
The faster you can get to 'time of failure', the better. You don't want to sit around for 8 hours to find out your system is unstable, you want to know in seconds or minutes. Maybe 1-3 hours as a final stability test, to be absolutely certain. But you gotta test ALL your sticks of RAM and EVERY channel of RAM you use. Otherwise it is similar to running your CPU at 50% of max speed and calling it stable and good. Nah-ah, not so fast, good sir! Gotta test 100% (or as close to as you can, without running out of RAM).
 
Oct 18, 2021
7
0
10
0
Half your RAM isn't enough. And 8 hours is on the too long side.
If you want to test like 90% of your RAM, actually a useful stability test, you should run HCI Memtest at least to 400%, Testmem5 with Anta777 config. There are others, like Karhu Ramtester but I haven't tried those.
The faster you can get to 'time of failure', the better. You don't want to sit around for 8 hours to find out your system is unstable, you want to know in seconds or minutes. Maybe 1-3 hours as a final stability test, to be absolutely certain. But you gotta test ALL your sticks of RAM and EVERY channel of RAM you use. Otherwise it is similar to running your CPU at 50% of max speed and calling it stable and good. Nah-ah, not so fast, good sir! Gotta test 100% (or as close to as you can, without running out of RAM).
Sorry, I was using Cinebench just for a quick benchmark. I have done some stability tests (OCCT memory and CPU for an hour), Aida64 for an hour, and Prime95 for an hour. All passed. I will try some of what you suggested
 
Oct 18, 2021
7
0
10
0
Half your RAM isn't enough. And 8 hours is on the too long side.
If you want to test like 90% of your RAM, actually a useful stability test, you should run HCI Memtest at least to 400%, Testmem5 with Anta777 config. There are others, like Karhu Ramtester but I haven't tried those.
The faster you can get to 'time of failure', the better. You don't want to sit around for 8 hours to find out your system is unstable, you want to know in seconds or minutes. Maybe 1-3 hours as a final stability test, to be absolutely certain. But you gotta test ALL your sticks of RAM and EVERY channel of RAM you use. Otherwise it is similar to running your CPU at 50% of max speed and calling it stable and good. Nah-ah, not so fast, good sir! Gotta test 100% (or as close to as you can, without running out of RAM).
Ok, I got MemTestPro and ran the test to 200%. I also ran the OCCT memory test and CPU (Large set, Variable load type, and Extreme Mode) for 2 hours each. No errors thus far. My games and general work also run great. I did have uninitiated reboots twice at night for no reason (bug check reboot) and one time during a restart I initiated in which case I got a blue screen error message (which then went on to reboot fine). I suspect my problem is related to curve optimization since the issues are occurring during idle time. So my plan is to first try the system without curve optimization to see how things go before I run MemTestPro to 400%. Thus far I have changed 3 things; 1) PBO with auto overclocking (175 MHz), 2) Curve Optimization per core, and 3) DOCP (3600), fCLK at 1800, DRAM V increased from1.35 to 1.36. Does troubleshooting the CO first seem reasonable??
 
Ok, I got MemTestPro and ran the test to 200%. I also ran the OCCT memory test and CPU (Large set, Variable load type, and Extreme Mode) for 2 hours each. No errors thus far. My games and general work also run great. I did have uninitiated reboots twice at night for no reason (bug check reboot) and one time during a restart I initiated in which case I got a blue screen error message (which then went on to reboot fine). I suspect my problem is related to curve optimization since the issues are occurring during idle time. So my plan is to first try the system without curve optimization to see how things go before I run MemTestPro to 400%. Thus far I have changed 3 things; 1) PBO with auto overclocking (175 MHz), 2) Curve Optimization per core, and 3) DOCP (3600), fCLK at 1800, DRAM V increased from1.35 to 1.36. Does troubleshooting the CO first seem reasonable??
" Does troubleshooting the CO first seem reasonable?? " Yes, those are the symptoms. Crash at idle. Yes, fix that first.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS