Question Newby Question: Can I upgrade my CPU and motherboard and still retain my OS and access all my files from my hard drive?

Bi3oi3

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Hi there,

Hoping someone will help out with a newbie question. I have an Intel i5-3570 CPU with a Socket 1155 motherboard. I am looking to upgrade to an i9-9900 CPU and socket 1151 motherboard.

Can I just add the other components to my new motherboard so that it will be working as before?

If I build it, will it automatically find my Windows 10 OS and my files on my hard drive or do I need to reinstall everything again?

Thanks very much for your help,
Brendan
 
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Yes, just simply plug in the hard drive into the new motherboard and the motherboard should recognize it as a bootable drive. As for software aspect, Windows should install any necessary drivers automatically but double check your new motherboard's official website to download any other drivers you feel are necessary to manually install if something is not working right. It's rare but Windows might not like the migration and cause issues like random blue screen, crashes etc. If this becomes frequent you may need to run a windows update first to see if that fixes it or as a last resort completely reset windows through the advance bootup menu (hold shift while pressing the restart button on windows).

Other than that it should be fine.
 
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ginthegit

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Hi there,

Hoping someone will help out with a newbie question. I have an Intel i5-3570 CPU with a Socket 1155 motherboard. I am looking to upgrade to an i9-9900 CPU and socket 1151 motherboard.

Can I just add the other components to my new motherboard so that it will be working as before?

If I build it, will it automatically find my Windows 10 OS and my files on my hard drive or do I need to reinstall everything again?

Thanks very much for your help,
Brendan
There is a simple trick to try with this.

MS tends to fail when you change the components because its KERNEL is primed to the old drivers of the tech. I used to get around this problem on Windows XP, by deleting all the drivers on the hardware part of the control panel. Then shut it down. Windows Kernel then will go on to refresh mode looking to fill the hardware void on its KERNEL when you restart it. So before you turn it on again, change the tech and restart.

I have not tried it on WIN10 so I cannot tell you if the Kernel works the same, but worth a try.

Otherwise you can set win10 to do a refresh, and when it restarts the first time, turn off and change the tech. It could quite possibly restart and discover all the new tech at that point. Again it is untested, so worth a try.
 

hotaru.hino

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Windows is smart enough to figure out that it's on another computer and adjust accordingly. You'll just have to grab and install the drivers for your new motherboard. However, as mentioned before, if issues are cropping up all over the place, you can opt to do the Reset feature (though I'd start with the one that preserves user files and settings)

There's also a note about Windows licenses. If you bought an OEM key, you'll need to buy a new key since OEM keys are tied to the motherboard it was first activated on. If you bought a retail key, then it shouldn't be a problem.
 

USAFRet

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an Intel i5-3570 CPU with a Socket 1155 motherboard. I am looking to upgrade to an i9-9900 CPU and socket 1151 motherboard.
That will almost certainly require a full OS reinstall.
A full OS reinstall will then require a reinstall of all your applications.

Moving to all new hardware and trying to keep the old drive+OS, there are 3 possible outcomes:
  1. It works just fine
  2. It fails completely
  3. It "works", but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.
#3 is becoming the most common outcome. There is NO guaranteed "Oh, it sill just work". None.

Licensing and Operation.

Licensing:
For the OS activation, read and do this before you change any parts:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/20530/windows-10-reactivating-after-hardware-change

Operation (a full reinstall):
 

USAFRet

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There is a simple trick to try with this.

MS tends to fail when you change the components because its KERNEL is primed to the old drivers of the tech. I used to get around this problem on Windows XP, by deleting all the drivers on the hardware part of the control panel. Then shut it down. Windows Kernel then will go on to refresh mode looking to fill the hardware void on its KERNEL when you restart it. So before you turn it on again, change the tech and restart.

I have not tried it on WIN10 so I cannot tell you if the Kernel works the same, but worth a try.

Otherwise you can set win10 to do a refresh, and when it restarts the first time, turn off and change the tech. It could quite possibly restart and discover all the new tech at that point. Again it is untested, so worth a try.
What happened with XP (5 versions and 2 decades ago) has ZERO to do with what happens with Win 10.
 

Rogue Leader

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Yes, just simply plug in the hard drive into the new motherboard and the motherboard should recognize it as a bootable drive.
This is partially right in that it will recognize it as a bootable drive, will it actually boot into windows? I'd give it a 50% chance. And this is JUST booting to windows, not actually functioning properly.

There is a simple trick to try with this.

MS tends to fail when you change the components because its KERNEL is primed to the old drivers of the tech. I used to get around this problem on Windows XP, by deleting all the drivers on the hardware part of the control panel. Then shut it down. Windows Kernel then will go on to refresh mode looking to fill the hardware void on its KERNEL when you restart it. So before you turn it on again, change the tech and restart.

I have not tried it on WIN10 so I cannot tell you if the Kernel works the same, but worth a try.

Otherwise you can set win10 to do a refresh, and when it restarts the first time, turn off and change the tech. It could quite possibly restart and discover all the new tech at that point. Again it is untested, so worth a try.
DO NOT do this in Windows 10, this is an easy way to break your windows install.

Windows is smart enough to figure out that it's on another computer and adjust accordingly.
Yes and no. Yes Windows will recognize its new hardware, but adjust accordingly is excessively unlikely.

If he was moving from 7th gen to 9th gen Intel the chances of this working are higher, but 3rd gen to 9th? Not so much.

@Bi3oi3 A lot of people will tell you yes and a lot of people will tell you no. The truth is NOBODY can answer this question with 100% certainty. For every person you can find that plugged the drive in and it worked, I can find you another who plugged it in and it borked. If you want to try this I suggest highly that you back up any and all essential files first, then give it a shot, this way if you make a mess you have a backup so no loss.

IF it even works it still may not be right, many people who do this and get it working report performance issues. The reality is, back up your stuff and do a fresh install. You can move the license over as USAFRet explained. THats the best way to get the most for your money.
 

ginthegit

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This is partially right in that it will recognize it as a bootable drive, will it actually boot into windows? I'd give it a 50% chance. And this is JUST booting to windows, not actually functioning properly.



DO NOT do this in Windows 10, this is an easy way to break your windows install.



Yes and no. Yes Windows will recognize its new hardware, but adjust accordingly is excessively unlikely.

If he was moving from 7th gen to 9th gen Intel the chances of this working are higher, but 3rd gen to 9th? Not so much.

@Bi3oi3 A lot of people will tell you yes and a lot of people will tell you no. The truth is NOBODY can answer this question with 100% certainty. For every person you can find that plugged the drive in and it worked, I can find you another who plugged it in and it borked. If you want to try this I suggest highly that you back up any and all essential files first, then give it a shot, this way if you make a mess you have a backup so no loss.

IF it even works it still may not be right, many people who do this and get it working report performance issues. The reality is, back up your stuff and do a fresh install. You can move the license over as USAFRet explained. THats the best way to get the most for your money.
But your whole point is based on conjecture and not tried. It is not hardware based at all, but software...
Maybe you are correct considering MS locking into its software a limited number of changes of hardware, but until someone tries it, conjecture is just conjecture.

One person plugging in hardware is not equal to another. If it is OEM for example then no chance. I tried to install A fujitsu version of Windows on a non fujitsu hardware and that will never work. But it still depends on how the person preps for the new hardware.

If the software is made to fail, then that is a settled deal, otherwise there is a system to trick... But I do remember now reading something about MS limiting the amount of Hardware from the installed iteration of the OS. My laptop is running the free upgrade version of WIN10, and this will have no chance of a transfer. But if it is a Bought version, then it can be an entirely different story...

Windows is like people in communism... We are all equal, but some (versions) are more equal than others...
 

USAFRet

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But your whole point is based on conjecture and not tried.
"conjecture" ?
"not tried"?

Myself, and many many others here HAVE tried it. Moving between different levels of hardware. Sometimes Intel-> Intel, or AMD->Intel, or AMD->AMD.
And reading hundreds, probably thousands, of people here trying to do exactly this.

Sometimes it works, sometimes it fails. Period.
Sometimes, the initial outcome is "It works!" A week later..."hmm...maybe not so much"


You yourself stated:
"I have not tried it on WIN10 so I cannot tell you if the Kernel works the same, but worth a try. "
"Again it is untested, so worth a try. "

Specific quotes.

So you've never actually tried this, and have NO idea.
OK.

Please don't just spout nonsense, based on what may or may not have worked years ago.
 

USAFRet

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My laptop is running the free upgrade version of WIN10, and this will have no chance of a transfer. But if it is a Bought version, then it can be an entirely different story...
And that is actually incorrect.
A valid Win 7 or 8 license that was Upgraded to Win 10 can almost certainly be transferred to different hardware. No matter if the original was "OEM" or otherwise.
The license, not the actual install.

And yes, many of us have studied this over the years. And again, actually tried it and seen the actual outcome.
 

Rogue Leader

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But your whole point is based on conjecture and not tried. It is not hardware based at all, but software...
Maybe you are correct considering MS locking into its software a limited number of changes of hardware, but until someone tries it, conjecture is just conjecture.

One person plugging in hardware is not equal to another. If it is OEM for example then no chance. I tried to install A fujitsu version of Windows on a non fujitsu hardware and that will never work. But it still depends on how the person preps for the new hardware.

If the software is made to fail, then that is a settled deal, otherwise there is a system to trick... But I do remember now reading something about MS limiting the amount of Hardware from the installed iteration of the OS. My laptop is running the free upgrade version of WIN10, and this will have no chance of a transfer. But if it is a Bought version, then it can be an entirely different story...

Windows is like people in communism... We are all equal, but some (versions) are more equal than others...
Who in the world are you to say its based on conjecture? I've only done this about 100 times, and I've only been working on computers since the mid 80's. I've also been a Mod on here since 2015ish and responded to literally hundreds of threads with people doing this. So no, conjecture is not the term to use for my experience.

I've moved OEM licenses between systems, it worked. I even reused an OEM Windows 7 key to install Win 10 on different hardware. Worked too.

The licensing isn't the issue, the KERNEL is as you seemed to so strongly point out. There are things that happen during its install that are not reversible No matter how much you reset it, clear it out etc. There are very few people who have been able to successfully transfer a drive and have it work 100%, usually that happens when the hardware transfer is between very similar pieces of hardware.
Wanna talk about conjecture?

I have not tried it on WIN10 so I cannot tell you if the Kernel works the same, but worth a try.

Otherwise you can set win10 to do a refresh, and when it restarts the first time, turn off and change the tech. It could quite possibly restart and discover all the new tech at that point. Again it is untested, so worth a try.
This is dangerous advice if this guy doesn't have a backup of the data. And YOU don't even know if it will work. I suggest moving along.
 

ginthegit

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Who in the world are you to say its based on conjecture? I've only done this about 100 times, and I've only been working on computers since the mid 80's. I've also been a Mod on here since 2015ish and responded to literally hundreds of threads with people doing this. So no, conjecture is not the term to use for my experience.

I've moved OEM licenses between systems, it worked. I even reused an OEM Windows 7 key to install Win 10 on different hardware. Worked too.

The licensing isn't the issue, the KERNEL is as you seemed to so strongly point out. There are things that happen during its install that are not reversible No matter how much you reset it, clear it out etc. There are very few people who have been able to successfully transfer a drive and have it work 100%, usually that happens when the hardware transfer is between very similar pieces of hardware.
Wanna talk about conjecture?



This is dangerous advice if this guy doesn't have a backup of the data. And YOU don't even know if it will work. I suggest moving along.
Like I said, Conjecture is based on approach... You may try your approach the same way 100 times (in which i doubt as the FOOL only tries the same thing that failed in the same way.)

So yes, you move to your default process in 100 operations (which is a massive over estimate) and still have not tried EITHER of my suggestions.

Going to a comercial repairer will not produce the same method as a hacker or Cracker. So like i said, conjecture, as you do your own method and NOT tried my Suggestions (which are also based on conjecture),

Back up of data is another issue, and if he does not have a back up hard drive and saving all of his important docs, then any suggestion made here would be risky. Hard drives can and will fail, and all is lost. So this is a moot point and one which the original questioner, we have assumed is following at least as much as his Docs are concerned. Games are also not too much of an issue as Steam et al copy progress of most games and save states to the cloud. So again a moot point.

The Kernel can be changed and repaired nugget. Lol, shows you have never messed with Linux much. Yes, it is a difficult job considering the kernel deals with hardware and its way to talk with the OS. But as with Linux, a Kernel can be rewritten (if you know what you are doing!.) But again, it depends on your experience.

Do you expect me to be impressed with your being a modder since the 80's. Considering in the 80s, the hardware for a PC was sub Amiga level. Not only that, until the X86 moved off its azz (as Amega kicked it with the motarola chip), I look at your case with disdain. I was writing Machine code in the 80's for the ZX spectrum and the C64...(eye roll).

And yes, I am an ASICS engineer, and been through both Software and hardware level implementation. However, I made some suggestions here based on Conjecture of my own, and yes I dont have much experience with WIN10 since they closed off the Low level registry aspect of the Kernel, so I use Linux. I made a suggestion and did not expect to be slammed for it. I never said It would work, I said you could try it.... If it did not work, a simple fresh install would suffice.
 
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USAFRet

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We're not talking about the user Docs, or Steam games. Both of which are trivially easy to move between drives, OS's, and systems. Steam has built in functionality to do exactly this.

We're instead talking about the actual Windows install. Not just the license.
You propose that the user simply rewrite the Windows kernal, to move that install between systems. And it will magically "just work" in the new hardware.

Even though you state you've never actually done this.

OK.
 

Rogue Leader

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However, I made some suggestions here based on Conjecture of my own, and yes I dont have much experience with WIN10 since they closed off the Low level registry aspect of the Kernel, so I use Linux. I made a suggestion and did not expect to be slammed for it. I never said It would work, I said you could try it.... If it did not work, a simple fresh install would suffice.
And this sir is why you should not be answering this question. If you don't know the correct answer (we do) then avoid providing answers that we DO KNOW for a fact are bad to do with Windows 10.
 

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