Nintendo Scores Another Victory Over ROM Sites

robax91

Honorable
Dec 26, 2012
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Protecting their property from infringement is understandable (like custom roms or new games using thier old assets), but it's not like they make any money off of second hand sales of old NES carts anyways. Really I don't understand why they care too much, if anything, letting people emulate and play classic titles could cause them to buy newer titles and merch. Unless they have plans to re-release those older titles on new platforms, they are just wasting money on legal fees. Pirates will always find a way and it's a losing battle.
 

AgentLozen

Distinguished
May 2, 2011
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I'm with Robax91 on this. Nintendo can't be soft and let pirates walk all over them, but declaring the start of the "War on Roms" (this is a play on the "War on Drugs" which is a miserable failure) is the wrong way to go. Like Robax91 said, the pirates will always find a way.

Nintendo should take a more passive approach. They can send out cease and desist letters to make themselves seem stern but they're alienating their fans with the fire and fury approach.
 

bala18

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Apr 4, 2018
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I've always hated Nintendo but this right here is why they will never get another cent of my money. If you believe in emulators boycott Nintendo now.
 
Nov 14, 2018
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The worst part is that they asked for the roms so they can resell them instead of creating the ROMs themselves. They already used downloaded ROMs on their NES classic
 

s1mon7

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Oct 3, 2018
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Holy crack, a 12 million dollar settlement with a husband and wife running a non-profit ROM site?! That's just pure evil.

I'd agree if it was about cloning Nintendo Switch games or something, but NES or GameBoy ROMS? That's just completely immoral. I think the laws should be changed to make old enough games public domain to prevent things like this from happening, and to keep the old works available to everyone as opposed to removing all traces of their existence. Either a company actively provides/sells and supports the game on its own on modern systems, or the public should be allowed to do it instead.

I can't believe Nintendo is doing this.
 

phobicsq

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Sep 1, 2017
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More examples of a corporation screwing customers and people over. If Nintendo gave two sh#ts they'd have remastered or released their older games by now on newer systems. They really haven't, I mean mario 3 on their system download isn't as good as that limited nes thing they released in limited quantities. This is also a company that threatens people for doing video reviews and walkthroughs. Their actions here and over the years made me hop switch would fail and they would be closer to bankruptcy.
 

mihen

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Oct 11, 2017
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$12 million is actually not that much when compared to similar cases of file-sharing and pirating. For a $12 million you file bankruptcy and it gets discharged.
 
The simple solution is to work out some sort of one time FRAND compulsory licensing per ROM image and be done with the whole issue. The owner of the protected work will get some money and the people who insist on using or distributing ROM images will be able to do their thing without fear of legal reprisal. The same should really apply for any intellectual property that has been fully and publicly distributed under the first distribution clause, but is out of print.
 
Nov 16, 2018
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To hell with Nintendo..... Just another corporation seeing people enjoying older products then wanting to cash in on it. This way they have the work all done for them so they can go ahead and start marketing and selling it. I'm sure the couple did all the work making sure they work in emulation and now Nintendo will swoop in to make the money off of it...they are already ahead 12 million now from the couple. That can be Nintendo's new motto.....Release something let the community mod and play with it til its a hit, then sue the person that did the work, take their work and as much money as they can from legal means, then re-release it to the public. This way they don't tie up their own developers and it doesn't cost them a cent.
 

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