No backward compatibility in Xbox 2

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http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?section_name=dev&aid=3645

Rob Fahey 16:15 21/06/2004
Because two boxes under the TV are as good as one, apparently


Sources close to Microsoft's senior Xbox executives have confirmed
that the company does not intend to make its next-generation console,
which is set to be launched by late 2005, backwards compatible with
existing Xbox software.

Speculation about the backwards compatibility functionality has been
rife since it emerged that Xbox 2 - codenamed Xenon - will have
radically different hardware to the original system, with a non-x86
processor, no hard drive and an ATI, rather than NVIDIA, graphics
chipset, all of which would make running Xbox titles on the platform
very difficult.

It was widely believed, however, that Microsoft had retained a team of
hardware emulation experts to work on the problem - although concerns
over the viability of such an endeavour were voiced by some experts,
especially regarding the company's ability to emulate the functions of
the graphics unit in the Xbox without violating NVIDIA's intellectual
property rights.

GamesIndustry.biz has now learned that Microsoft does not plan to
provide any backwards compatibility in the next-generation Xenon
platform - and indeed, that senior executives at the company don't
believe backwards compatibility to be an important feature for
consoles.

According to a source close to the project, internal Microsoft figures
suggest that only 10 per cent of PlayStation 2 purchasers were
interested in the console's ability to play titles developed for the
original PlayStation.

Although this still represents some seven million consumers on a
global basis - which is around half of Microsoft's entire installed
base for Xbox - the company apparently believes that allowing
consumers to play existing Xbox titles on the next-generation hardware
would not be a significant deciding factor for Xenon purchasers.

However, a report into the videogames industry published today by
Wedbrush Morgan Securities senior vice president Michael Pachter
disagrees with this conclusion - arguing that failing to provide
backward compatibility could have the effect of alienating Microsoft's
existing Xbox installed base.

"In the event that Xbox Next is not backward compatible, we think that
the device will be very slow to grow its footprint," the report warns,
while elsewhere it suggests that such a move could damage the
company's long-term prospects for the console.

"We do expect Microsoft to launch its console first, perhaps as early
as 2005," says Pachter. "Should it choose to do so without backward
compatibility or significant third-party software support, we expect
to see its first-mover advantage evaporate."
 
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"R420" <radeonr420@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:51488ce2.0406210929.77ec946a@posting.google.com...
> http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?section_name=dev&aid=3645
>
> Rob Fahey 16:15 21/06/2004
> Because two boxes under the TV are as good as one, apparently
>
>
> Sources close to Microsoft's senior Xbox executives have confirmed
> that the company does not intend to make its next-generation console,
> which is set to be launched by late 2005, backwards compatible with
> existing Xbox software.
>
> Speculation about the backwards compatibility functionality has been
> rife since it emerged that Xbox 2 - codenamed Xenon - will have
> radically different hardware to the original system, with a non-x86
> processor, no hard drive and an ATI, rather than NVIDIA, graphics
> chipset, all of which would make running Xbox titles on the platform
> very difficult.
>
> It was widely believed, however, that Microsoft had retained a team of
> hardware emulation experts to work on the problem - although concerns
> over the viability of such an endeavour were voiced by some experts,
> especially regarding the company's ability to emulate the functions of
> the graphics unit in the Xbox without violating NVIDIA's intellectual
> property rights.
>
> GamesIndustry.biz has now learned that Microsoft does not plan to
> provide any backwards compatibility in the next-generation Xenon
> platform - and indeed, that senior executives at the company don't
> believe backwards compatibility to be an important feature for
> consoles.
>
> According to a source close to the project, internal Microsoft figures
> suggest that only 10 per cent of PlayStation 2 purchasers were
> interested in the console's ability to play titles developed for the
> original PlayStation.
>
> Although this still represents some seven million consumers on a
> global basis - which is around half of Microsoft's entire installed
> base for Xbox - the company apparently believes that allowing
> consumers to play existing Xbox titles on the next-generation hardware
> would not be a significant deciding factor for Xenon purchasers.
>
> However, a report into the videogames industry published today by
> Wedbrush Morgan Securities senior vice president Michael Pachter
> disagrees with this conclusion - arguing that failing to provide
> backward compatibility could have the effect of alienating Microsoft's
> existing Xbox installed base.
>
> "In the event that Xbox Next is not backward compatible, we think that
> the device will be very slow to grow its footprint," the report warns,
> while elsewhere it suggests that such a move could damage the
> company's long-term prospects for the console.
>
> "We do expect Microsoft to launch its console first, perhaps as early
> as 2005," says Pachter. "Should it choose to do so without backward
> compatibility or significant third-party software support, we expect
> to see its first-mover advantage evaporate."

Who cares. Who wants to play Xbox games on an Xbox 2?
 

Leo

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ccs wrote:

>>
>>"We do expect Microsoft to launch its console first, perhaps as early
>>as 2005," says Pachter. "Should it choose to do so without backward
>>compatibility or significant third-party software support, we expect
>>to see its first-mover advantage evaporate."
>
>
> Who cares. Who wants to play Xbox games on an Xbox 2?
>

Exactly. There are only two units that I can think of that had backward
compatibility. The PS2 and the Game Boy (insert your version here).
With the Game boy it was basically because the only changes were the
addition of a color screen, a light and a smaller unit. They didn't
change the guts of the game boy other than due to miniturization of
components, so it's basically the same game boy as the original made
however many moons ago now. The PS2 is the only console I can recall
with backwards compatibility, and due to the sales they have had, people
just assume it is/should always be this way. Keep in mind that given
the average age of most gamers, Many never even played a NES or even a
SNES. When the next gen came out, you bought the new one, plain and
simple. While it is a nice feature in only having to have one system
hooked up to your tv, many now have both PS2 and Xbox at home, why not
add an Xbox 2 to the mix. With the exception of a few outstanding
titles, most people don't play PS one games on their PS2 consoles. The
same would be true of Xbox 2, and since many of the outstanding games on
the Xbox are series games, I am sure a newer, better version of them
will be out at launch or within a month of launch.
 
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radeonr420@yahoo.com (R420) wrote in message news:<51488ce2.0406210929.77ec946a@posting.google.com>...

A key point which will be ignored even though I've been saying it all along:

> http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?section_name=dev&aid=3645

> According to a source close to the project, internal Microsoft figures
> suggest that only 10 per cent of PlayStation 2 purchasers were
> interested in the console's ability to play titles developed for the
> original PlayStation.

- Jordan
 
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>
> Who cares. Who wants to play Xbox games on an Xbox 2?
>
>

Well, I do.
 
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"ccs" <temp@no.com> wrote in message news:H1FBc.21124$ey.8485@fed1read06...
>
> "R420" <radeonr420@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:51488ce2.0406210929.77ec946a@posting.google.com...
> > http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?section_name=dev&aid=3645
> >
> > Rob Fahey 16:15 21/06/2004
> > Because two boxes under the TV are as good as one, apparently
> >
> >
> > Sources close to Microsoft's senior Xbox executives have confirmed
> > that the company does not intend to make its next-generation console,
> > which is set to be launched by late 2005, backwards compatible with
> > existing Xbox software.
> >
> > Speculation about the backwards compatibility functionality has been
> > rife since it emerged that Xbox 2 - codenamed Xenon - will have
> > radically different hardware to the original system, with a non-x86
> > processor, no hard drive and an ATI, rather than NVIDIA, graphics
> > chipset, all of which would make running Xbox titles on the platform
> > very difficult.
> >
> > It was widely believed, however, that Microsoft had retained a team of
> > hardware emulation experts to work on the problem - although concerns
> > over the viability of such an endeavour were voiced by some experts,
> > especially regarding the company's ability to emulate the functions of
> > the graphics unit in the Xbox without violating NVIDIA's intellectual
> > property rights.
> >
> > GamesIndustry.biz has now learned that Microsoft does not plan to
> > provide any backwards compatibility in the next-generation Xenon
> > platform - and indeed, that senior executives at the company don't
> > believe backwards compatibility to be an important feature for
> > consoles.
> >
> > According to a source close to the project, internal Microsoft figures
> > suggest that only 10 per cent of PlayStation 2 purchasers were
> > interested in the console's ability to play titles developed for the
> > original PlayStation.
> >
> > Although this still represents some seven million consumers on a
> > global basis - which is around half of Microsoft's entire installed
> > base for Xbox - the company apparently believes that allowing
> > consumers to play existing Xbox titles on the next-generation hardware
> > would not be a significant deciding factor for Xenon purchasers.
> >
> > However, a report into the videogames industry published today by
> > Wedbrush Morgan Securities senior vice president Michael Pachter
> > disagrees with this conclusion - arguing that failing to provide
> > backward compatibility could have the effect of alienating Microsoft's
> > existing Xbox installed base.
> >
> > "In the event that Xbox Next is not backward compatible, we think that
> > the device will be very slow to grow its footprint," the report warns,
> > while elsewhere it suggests that such a move could damage the
> > company's long-term prospects for the console.
> >
> > "We do expect Microsoft to launch its console first, perhaps as early
> > as 2005," says Pachter. "Should it choose to do so without backward
> > compatibility or significant third-party software support, we expect
> > to see its first-mover advantage evaporate."
>
> Who cares. Who wants to play Xbox games on an Xbox 2?

I do. I have a big X-Box library and don't want more than one console
sitting under my TV. I'll stick with the X-Box until the game library for
the X-Box2 is big enough and good enouogh to make me forget my vast X-Box
library. And also when I can mod my X-Box2 so it can do everything my X-Box
does. In other words I'll probably get an X-Box 2 at least half-way through
its life cycle

- Cryo
 
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Everybody says backwards compatibility doesn't matter, and this might be
true for a console that lasts 5-6 years like the Playstation. But Microsoft
is planning an early release in 2005, so they risk alienating their fanbase.

Yeah, only 10 percent of PS2 owners were interested in backwards
compatibility. It's a largely symbolic move on Sony's part, although I did
make use of the feature (having never owned a Playstation before). It's
just a "nice touch", also helps encourage people who own the last console to
buy the next one. Sometimes the old console is worn out (especially disk
type media- including hard disks, BTW), and a new, backwards compatible
console wil keep playing old games.

I think Microsoft faces long term strategy problems with their console.
They have successfully gutted the finer points of PC gaming (Bungie, ahem)
to try and prop up their platform, and even then they don't do too well.
Links 2004, for instance, on the PC got rather mediocre reviews for a game
that Microsoft basicly took out of its element and desperately put onto a
console to try and round out its meager library with few "killer apps". I
think the only thing that has made X-Box number 2 globally, instead of a
total washout ,has been Nintendo's snatching defeat from the jaws of
victory. Between the ridiculous design of their hardware (their controllers
are far too small and flimsy feeling, and the button design is ridiculous
and fischer-price-esque... not to mention the general unfriendlyness of the
square box shape on an entertainment rack), to the odd choices in media,
and, begrudgingly I'll admit, a nonexistant online component, I think it's
safe to say Microsoft owes its console success to Nintendo's poor showing.
 
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Alot of people care, ask anyone who has worked in the gaming industry.
WHether its sales or programming, people want to be able to play
their old game son their new system. If the ps3 lets you play ps2
games on it, the Xbox has already shot itself in the foot.
 
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lundj@earthlink.net (Jordan Lund) wrote in
news:92dbefbe.0406211437.14c02532@posting.google.com:

> radeonr420@yahoo.com (R420) wrote in message
> news:<51488ce2.0406210929.77ec946a@posting.google.com>...
>
> A key point which will be ignored even though I've been
> saying it all along:
>
>> http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?section_name=
>> dev&aid=3645
>
>> According to a source close to the project, internal
>> Microsoft figures suggest that only 10 per cent of
>> PlayStation 2 purchasers were interested in the console's
>> ability to play titles developed for the original
>> PlayStation.
>
> - Jordan

I think you'd agree that there is a big difference between PS1
games and PS2/XBox games. PS1 games are not that great to want
to play them on PS2. However, there are many XBox/PS2 games that
will still be worth playing 2-3 years from now, especially for
a first-timer. By the time PS3 and XBox2 hit the market
the must-have's for last gen. consoles will be like 10-15$.
I also makes more sense to have only one console under your TV
especially if both of them would be hooked up with component
cables ( rare case, but nontheless ). I do believe that backward
compatibility will be more valuable this time around. Only time
will tell.
 
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I don't know if this is a good idea. What about all the people that spent
hundreds of dollars on X-box games?

Gus


"R420" <radeonr420@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:51488ce2.0406210929.77ec946a@posting.google.com...
> http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?section_name=dev&aid=3645
>
> Rob Fahey 16:15 21/06/2004
> Because two boxes under the TV are as good as one, apparently
>
>
> Sources close to Microsoft's senior Xbox executives have confirmed
> that the company does not intend to make its next-generation console,
> which is set to be launched by late 2005, backwards compatible with
> existing Xbox software.
>
> Speculation about the backwards compatibility functionality has been
> rife since it emerged that Xbox 2 - codenamed Xenon - will have
> radically different hardware to the original system, with a non-x86
> processor, no hard drive and an ATI, rather than NVIDIA, graphics
> chipset, all of which would make running Xbox titles on the platform
> very difficult.
>
> It was widely believed, however, that Microsoft had retained a team of
> hardware emulation experts to work on the problem - although concerns
> over the viability of such an endeavour were voiced by some experts,
> especially regarding the company's ability to emulate the functions of
> the graphics unit in the Xbox without violating NVIDIA's intellectual
> property rights.
>
> GamesIndustry.biz has now learned that Microsoft does not plan to
> provide any backwards compatibility in the next-generation Xenon
> platform - and indeed, that senior executives at the company don't
> believe backwards compatibility to be an important feature for
> consoles.
>
> According to a source close to the project, internal Microsoft figures
> suggest that only 10 per cent of PlayStation 2 purchasers were
> interested in the console's ability to play titles developed for the
> original PlayStation.
>
> Although this still represents some seven million consumers on a
> global basis - which is around half of Microsoft's entire installed
> base for Xbox - the company apparently believes that allowing
> consumers to play existing Xbox titles on the next-generation hardware
> would not be a significant deciding factor for Xenon purchasers.
>
> However, a report into the videogames industry published today by
> Wedbrush Morgan Securities senior vice president Michael Pachter
> disagrees with this conclusion - arguing that failing to provide
> backward compatibility could have the effect of alienating Microsoft's
> existing Xbox installed base.
>
> "In the event that Xbox Next is not backward compatible, we think that
> the device will be very slow to grow its footprint," the report warns,
> while elsewhere it suggests that such a move could damage the
> company's long-term prospects for the console.
>
> "We do expect Microsoft to launch its console first, perhaps as early
> as 2005," says Pachter. "Should it choose to do so without backward
> compatibility or significant third-party software support, we expect
> to see its first-mover advantage evaporate."
 
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"Clixx" <none@none.com> wrote in message
news:KImdnbU4W-tV5Urd4p2dnA@magma.ca...
> lundj@earthlink.net (Jordan Lund) wrote in
> news:92dbefbe.0406211437.14c02532@posting.google.com:
>
> > radeonr420@yahoo.com (R420) wrote in message
> > news:<51488ce2.0406210929.77ec946a@posting.google.com>...
> >
> > A key point which will be ignored even though I've been
> > saying it all along:
> >
> >> http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?section_name=
> >> dev&aid=3645
> >
> >> According to a source close to the project, internal
> >> Microsoft figures suggest that only 10 per cent of
> >> PlayStation 2 purchasers were interested in the console's
> >> ability to play titles developed for the original
> >> PlayStation.
> >
> > - Jordan
>
> I think you'd agree that there is a big difference between PS1
> games and PS2/XBox games. PS1 games are not that great to want
> to play them on PS2. However, there are many XBox/PS2 games that
> will still be worth playing 2-3 years from now, especially for
> a first-timer. By the time PS3 and XBox2 hit the market
> the must-have's for last gen. consoles will be like 10-15$.
> I also makes more sense to have only one console under your TV
> especially if both of them would be hooked up with component
> cables ( rare case, but nontheless ). I do believe that backward
> compatibility will be more valuable this time around. Only time
> will tell.

Do you not think that people felt the same way about PS1 games back then?
 
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Well, I've spent about $1200 on games for Xbox. If, there is no backwards
compatibility, I will mod my xbox, rip everything I rent to the upgraded
hard drive, and revert back to PC gaming....never to buy another xbox game
again...much less the xbox2. Especially if they release a Hard Drive as a
separate peripheral.

Thanks a lot for the support you grant for all the people that supported you
Microsoft.

"R420" <radeonr420@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:51488ce2.0406210929.77ec946a@posting.google.com...
> http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?section_name=dev&aid=3645
>
> Rob Fahey 16:15 21/06/2004
> Because two boxes under the TV are as good as one, apparently
>
>
> Sources close to Microsoft's senior Xbox executives have confirmed
> that the company does not intend to make its next-generation console,
> which is set to be launched by late 2005, backwards compatible with
> existing Xbox software.
>
> Speculation about the backwards compatibility functionality has been
> rife since it emerged that Xbox 2 - codenamed Xenon - will have
> radically different hardware to the original system, with a non-x86
> processor, no hard drive and an ATI, rather than NVIDIA, graphics
> chipset, all of which would make running Xbox titles on the platform
> very difficult.
>
> It was widely believed, however, that Microsoft had retained a team of
> hardware emulation experts to work on the problem - although concerns
> over the viability of such an endeavour were voiced by some experts,
> especially regarding the company's ability to emulate the functions of
> the graphics unit in the Xbox without violating NVIDIA's intellectual
> property rights.
>
> GamesIndustry.biz has now learned that Microsoft does not plan to
> provide any backwards compatibility in the next-generation Xenon
> platform - and indeed, that senior executives at the company don't
> believe backwards compatibility to be an important feature for
> consoles.
>
> According to a source close to the project, internal Microsoft figures
> suggest that only 10 per cent of PlayStation 2 purchasers were
> interested in the console's ability to play titles developed for the
> original PlayStation.
>
> Although this still represents some seven million consumers on a
> global basis - which is around half of Microsoft's entire installed
> base for Xbox - the company apparently believes that allowing
> consumers to play existing Xbox titles on the next-generation hardware
> would not be a significant deciding factor for Xenon purchasers.
>
> However, a report into the videogames industry published today by
> Wedbrush Morgan Securities senior vice president Michael Pachter
> disagrees with this conclusion - arguing that failing to provide
> backward compatibility could have the effect of alienating Microsoft's
> existing Xbox installed base.
>
> "In the event that Xbox Next is not backward compatible, we think that
> the device will be very slow to grow its footprint," the report warns,
> while elsewhere it suggests that such a move could damage the
> company's long-term prospects for the console.
>
> "We do expect Microsoft to launch its console first, perhaps as early
> as 2005," says Pachter. "Should it choose to do so without backward
> compatibility or significant third-party software support, we expect
> to see its first-mover advantage evaporate."
 

ken

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radeonr420@yahoo.com (R420) wrote in message news:<51488ce2.0406210929.77ec946a@posting.google.com>...
> http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?section_name=dev&aid=3645
>
> Rob Fahey 16:15 21/06/2004
> Because two boxes under the TV are as good as one, apparently
>
>

What about backward compatibility of peripherals, like controllers,
connectors, memory cards, etc.?

Surely, they won't make us go out and repurchase all that stuff too.
 

ms

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I think this is both a good and a bad thing. A good thing if it makes XBox2
cheaper and more powerful and a bad thing for those with a huge game
library.

But then again...Amiga wasn't compatible with C64, and I had a huge amount
of games for C64. But Amiga was much more powerful and the games much
better. I had both C64 and Amiga for six months or so, and I noticed that
not once did I play C64 games after getting Amiga. If the developers had
made Amiga compatible with C64 it probably wouldn't had been as powerful.

The thing with backwards compability always means that the console also
drags along all the problems and old technology of the old one. My cd wasn't
compatible with my old LP records, and I had no problem buying the music
again once I had tried a cd player and noticed how much better the sound is,
and how much nicer a cd is to use.

So I don't mind, as long as it means that Xbox2 games will really blow my
socks of with amazing graphics, sound and gameplay, just like Xbox did when
I first got it.

And that means that I hope to see PGR3, RSC3 and Halo3 at launch... :)
 

skeksis

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"ccs" <temp@no.com> wrote in news:H1FBc.21124$ey.8485@fed1read06:

> Who cares. Who wants to play Xbox games on an Xbox 2?

I do. One box will do for me, thanks.

Skeksis
 
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"Keith C. G." <keithG@alteredtheory.com> wrote:

>Thanks a lot for the support you grant for all the people that supported you
>Microsoft.

Don't you know that Micro$oft would gladly come to your house and take
a shite on your front porch, if it meant one more dollar for them?
 
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"Mickey Johnson" <mickster@derbyworks.net> wrote in message news:<2jp5sbF142qg1U1@uni-berlin.de>...
> You must be old... a 7800 could play 2600 games.. 5200 were a different
> style of cartridge.
>
>
>
> --
>
The Japanese Super Famicom (SNES) was backwards compatible with the
Famicom (NES.) For whatever reasons, they changed the style of
cartridge for the US version. I have heard of some people who have
modified the game slot on their SNES and played NES titles.
 
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"Mattinglyfan" <Estoscacahuates@comcast.net> wrote in
news:R_idnT8On5xBW0rdRVn-uw@comcast.com:

>
> "Clixx" <none@none.com> wrote in message
> news:KImdnbU4W-tV5Urd4p2dnA@magma.ca...
>> lundj@earthlink.net (Jordan Lund) wrote in
>> news:92dbefbe.0406211437.14c02532@posting.google.com:
>>
>> > radeonr420@yahoo.com (R420) wrote in message
>> > news:<51488ce2.0406210929.77ec946a@posting.google.com>...
>> >
>> > A key point which will be ignored even though I've been
>> > saying it all along:
>> >
>> >> http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?section_na
>> >> me= dev&aid=3645
>> >
>> >> According to a source close to the project, internal
>> >> Microsoft figures suggest that only 10 per cent of
>> >> PlayStation 2 purchasers were interested in the
>> >> console's ability to play titles developed for the
>> >> original PlayStation.
>> >
>> > - Jordan
>>
>> I think you'd agree that there is a big difference between
>> PS1 games and PS2/XBox games. PS1 games are not that great
>> to want to play them on PS2. However, there are many
>> XBox/PS2 games that will still be worth playing 2-3 years
>> from now, especially for a first-timer. By the time PS3
>> and XBox2 hit the market the must-have's for last gen.
>> consoles will be like 10-15$. I also makes more sense to
>> have only one console under your TV especially if both of
>> them would be hooked up with component cables ( rare case,
>> but nontheless ). I do believe that backward compatibility
>> will be more valuable this time around. Only time will
>> tell.
>
> Do you not think that people felt the same way about PS1
> games back then?

My guess is as good as yours. People were used to not having
backward compatibility. That could be the reason. Also I think
that Sony would have a hell of a time figuring out what
percentage of players were actually interested in backward
compatibility of PS2, and I don't really trust the pharse
"internal Microsoft figures", so the actual number is likely to
be higher then 10%.
 
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"Ken" <kenondang@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:9adcdb00.0406220547.18331c28@posting.google.com...
> radeonr420@yahoo.com (R420) wrote in message
news:<51488ce2.0406210929.77ec946a@posting.google.com>...
> > http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?section_name=dev&aid=3645
> >
> > Rob Fahey 16:15 21/06/2004
> > Because two boxes under the TV are as good as one, apparently
> >
> >
>
> What about backward compatibility of peripherals, like controllers,
> connectors, memory cards, etc.?
>
> Surely, they won't make us go out and repurchase all that stuff too.
Wanna Bet?
 
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Clixx <none@none.com> wrote in message news:<b56dncbq8qF0ekXdRVn-vw@magma.ca>...
> My guess is as good as yours. People were used to not having
> backward compatibility. That could be the reason. Also I think
> that Sony would have a hell of a time figuring out what
> percentage of players were actually interested in backward
> compatibility of PS2, and I don't really trust the pharse
> "internal Microsoft figures", so the actual number is likely to
> be higher then 10%.

or it could be lower. But regardless I do agree with you that its a
little difficult to come up some any sort of accurate figure in this
area especially as backwards compatibility is mostly important in the
beginning year and becomes less and less important as the console
establishes itself. So if you were to conduct say, a focus group this
late in the console's life, the results you're going to get is going
to be far different than what you get in the earlier stages of the
console's life or before the console launches. If MS claimed only 10%
of their own players were interested in the potential backwards
compatibility feature of XBOX2, then that I would buy, but claiming
that about a product that isn't even theirs I find skeptical at best.
The only figure that I can claim with any sort of confidence would be
that FOR ME, backwards compatibility was a factor, as I never owned a
PS1.