[SOLVED] No boot after Enabling Resizable Bar, Disabling CSM

Dec 6, 2022
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Pretty green here on the technical side of pc’s. I am trying to enable Resizable Bar for my RTX 3050. When I enable it in the bios, it makes me disable CSM but once I do so I cannot boot pc. With CSM disabled, bios cannot find my ssd boot drive. Someone was telling me that if CSM is not booting with it disabled then my OS is not configured as a UEFI boot. So my question here is what do I do to either configure my boot drive as a UEFI so I can run resizable bar, or if there’s another solution I’m all ears. I also don’t want to lose the data saved on my boot ssd if that would even be a potential issue. Thanks in advance!

GPU: Gigabyte RTX 3050 Gaming OC 8g
CPU: Intel i7-10700k
Motherboard: Tuf Gaming Z590 Plus Wifi
Ram: Trident Z Royal 3600mhz 8gb (x4)
SSD/HDD: Samsung SSD 980 500gb (boot), Samsung Extreme Pro 500gb, Seagate Barracuda 7200rpm 2TB
PSU: Thermaltake Toughpower GF1 ARGB 850W 80+ Gold
Chassis: LianLi Lancool II Mesh RGB
OS: Windows 10 pro
Monitors: Samsung 49'' Odyssey G9, Samsung 28" UE590 UHD
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So, are you able to POST and boot back into Windows if you reset the BIOS and do not enable resizable bar?

If so, then the answer is that you will want to do that, then backup any important information you need to backup, to some other drive whether a secondary internal drive or an external or cloud storage solution, and then you'll need to do a clean install of Windows. There is no other way around it if you have a non-UEFI installation and it must be a UEFI installation for resizable bar to be enabled.

So, reset BIOS, backup data, create Windows installation media, go back into BIOS, disable CSM, enable any other required UEFI settings, then perform a clean install of Windows.

What Windows version are you running?

What are your FULL hardware specifications including specific model numbers for motherboard, CPU, memory kit, power supply, storage devices, etc?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So, are you able to POST and boot back into Windows if you reset the BIOS and do not enable resizable bar?

If so, then the answer is that you will want to do that, then backup any important information you need to backup, to some other drive whether a secondary internal drive or an external or cloud storage solution, and then you'll need to do a clean install of Windows. There is no other way around it if you have a non-UEFI installation and it must be a UEFI installation for resizable bar to be enabled.

So, reset BIOS, backup data, create Windows installation media, go back into BIOS, disable CSM, enable any other required UEFI settings, then perform a clean install of Windows.

What Windows version are you running?

What are your FULL hardware specifications including specific model numbers for motherboard, CPU, memory kit, power supply, storage devices, etc?
 
Dec 6, 2022
2
0
10
0
So, are you able to POST and boot back into Windows if you reset the BIOS and do not enable resizable bar?

If so, then the answer is that you will want to do that, then backup any important information you need to backup, to some other drive whether a secondary internal drive or an external or cloud storage solution, and then you'll need to do a clean install of Windows. There is no other way around it if you have a non-UEFI installation and it must be a UEFI installation for resizable bar to be enabled.

So, reset BIOS, backup data, create Windows installation media, go back into BIOS, disable CSM, enable any other required UEFI settings, then perform a clean install of Windows.

What Windows version are you running?

What are your FULL hardware specifications including specific model numbers for motherboard, CPU, memory kit, power supply, storage devices, etc?
Yes, able to post after reenabling CSM as normal. Thank you for the reply, looks like the info I was needing. I think since I have a third empty M.2 slot I'll just use that as an excuse to buy another SSD and make that one my boot drive configured as a UEFI lol... I believe I was editing my post with hardware specs while you were replying to original post.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If possible, I'd move any other M.2 drives around and use the primary one closest to the CPU for the drive the OS will be on. That slot is tied directly to the CPU lanes and is likely to fewer termination signal issues and thus probably a minutely better performance. Generally speaking it doesn't REALLY matter but the primary M.2 slot is where the BIOS generally looks first for M.2 boot device. In fact, other M.2 slots may even be disabled on that chipset if a SATA drive is connected to certain headers. I'd have to look at the manual to be sure.

But in any case, yeah, that should get you where you need to be.
 

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