[SOLVED] No Boot to Windows 10, GPU and Mobo already RMA'd

Aug 9, 2021
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I'm seriously at a loss here. I have no idea what's going on with my computer... See below
Specs:
  • Gigabyte X570 I AORUS PRO WIFI
  • AMD Ryzen 5 3600
  • 8GB x 2 modules of corsair vengeance PRO 3200mhz RGB
  • ASUS RTX 2070 Mini
  • Samsung 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive
  • Cooler Master MWE Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply
  • Age: 16 months
Issue:
In January of this year, my computer began to crash whenever I would play games. It wouldn't have to be a highly-demanding game either, just South Park Stick of Truth would crash it. Both monitors would turn black and the GPU fans would go to 100%. I resisted doing an RMA, so I tried a fresh install of Windows and the problem went away. Fast forward to May I started to have the issue again, except this time after a reboot, my memory speeds would reset to 2133mhz (default), and my clock would reset. Still thinking it was a GPU problem, I rma'd the graphics card back to ASUS for a fresh one. This appeared to solve the issue at first, but after a few weeks, I ran into the same issue: fans 100%, screen black. In event viewer, I was seeing the referenced watchdog BSOD. See the referenced minidump file(s). https://www.mediafire.com/file/2ihz16hfsr6y7t9/minidump.zip/file

Believing that in no way it could be my graphics card again, I tried a fresh install of windows because that worked in the past. This is when things got really bad. I couldn't install windows. The computer was giving me either a "clock watchdog timeout" BSOD, or the screens would turn black during installation, and the peripherals would disconnect. After reading that it could be an issue with my mobo, I decided to rma that as well... It was shipped back to me last week with an updated UEFI version. I was able to install Windows on this one, but after I installed a few basic apps like Discord, Steam, Epic Games, Geforce Experience with new drivers, and SteelSeries GG- the next time I would turn on my computer, it would crash at login, with the screens going black and peripherals disconnected. I have no idea what to try next. Do I RMA my CPU?
Summary of Troubleshooting:
  1. Fresh install of Windows 10
  2. Rollback Nvidia Drivers
  3. Unseat, Reseat GPU
  4. Unseat Reseat Memory
  5. Ran Windows Memory Diagnostic multiple times, but results weren't found in Event Viewer.
  6. RMA'd GPU
  7. RMA'd Mobo
  8. Fresh Install of Windows 10
  9. Cleared CMOS
  10. Ran memtest86. Went through 2 full tests, with no errors.
  11. Ran NVMe troubleshooter that came baked into UEFI.
I'm sorry for making this a super long post. I didn't want to leave any detail out. Thanks so much in advance for your time and help. :)
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
If a driver is corrupt then uninstalling the driver would directly remove the problem or end some indirect problem being caused by the driver.

PSU:

Remember that the PSU is a critical system component that provides three different voltages (3, 5, and 12) to the host system and its' components.

So even if some things work (or appear to work) a problem with a different voltage rail can still cause problems and failures.

FYI:

https://computer.howstuffworks.com/power-supply.htm
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
This:

"Cooler Master MWE Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply "

The power supply also being "16 months" old and heavily used for gaming....

In my mind multiple and varying problems make the PSU a suspect. Did you mix and match in any modular PSU cables from other PSUs?

Do you have a multi-meter and know how to use it? Or know someone who does?

FYI:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158

Not a full test because the PSU is not under load, However, any voltages out of spec would implicate the PSU.

All in all you have sort of "circled around" the PSU. Take a look at it.
 
Aug 9, 2021
3
0
10
0
This:

"Cooler Master MWE Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply "

The power supply also being "16 months" old and heavily used for gaming....

In my mind multiple and varying problems make the PSU a suspect. Did you mix and match in any modular PSU cables from other PSUs?

Do you have a multi-meter and know how to use it? Or know someone who does?

FYI:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158

Not a full test because the PSU is not under load, However, any voltages out of spec would implicate the PSU.

All in all you have sort of "circled around" the PSU. Take a look at it.
I haven't mixed any modular PSU cables from other PSUs, but it did come with a spare PCIe cable. I'll try that and see if it works. I also manually uninstalled the Nvidia driver from Device Manager from Safe Mode. This allowed the computer to normally boot into Windows, but only for a few minutes. Screen turned black, peripheral lights turned off (RGB mouse and keyboard). Not sure if that detail helps.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
"This allowed the computer to normally boot into Windows, but only for a few minutes. Screen turned black, peripheral lights turned off (RGB mouse and keyboard). "

That does help.

The PSU does not seem to be able to handle even that. Okay at first but once warmed up something falters or fails.
 
Aug 9, 2021
3
0
10
0
"This allowed the computer to normally boot into Windows, but only for a few minutes. Screen turned black, peripheral lights turned off (RGB mouse and keyboard). "

That does help.

The PSU does not seem to be able to handle even that. Okay at first but once warmed up something falters or fails.
I really don't believe it's the PSU. How would uninstalling a driver cause my computer to boot properly? Also, the computer isn't turning off when it has an issue. Fans are still on, GPU light on, etc.. just the monitors and peripherals turn off (or for the monitors, no signal).
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
If a driver is corrupt then uninstalling the driver would directly remove the problem or end some indirect problem being caused by the driver.

PSU:

Remember that the PSU is a critical system component that provides three different voltages (3, 5, and 12) to the host system and its' components.

So even if some things work (or appear to work) a problem with a different voltage rail can still cause problems and failures.

FYI:

https://computer.howstuffworks.com/power-supply.htm
 

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