No, Coffee Lake Will Not Run In Z270 Motherboards (And Here’s Why)

Status
Not open for further replies.

jdwii

Splendid
So i expected it would be over VRM but why stop users from getting the quad core? Also 5ghz 7700K overclocks obviously demands more from the VRM then a 8700K at stock settings.

This will be a major upgrade for all Intel users and will probably become the new sandy-bridge in terms of reputation
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator

The VRM may meet the power rating spec but perhaps not the load transient requirements or some other more subtle parts of the VRM specs.
 

redgarl

Distinguished
Jun 4, 2009
2,757
18
20,965
82
There has been plenty of speculation that Intel's Coffee Lake lineup is a direct reaction to AMD's Ryzen processors, but given the extended nature of processor development,

The lauch is rushed 6 months in advance. Kaby Lake was release not even 9 months ago. I never seen Intel release two CPU architecture in the same year almost in the same fiscal year. It's obvious that AMD bother them... and guess what, AMD is skipping 10nm, so it is going to be like this for a while.
 

bennie101

Distinguished
Feb 13, 2007
136
0
18,710
7
Buy Intel expect to buy a new motherboard every 2 cycles if your lucky.
Headed to amds side for awhile and see if Intel gets its head out of its a@#..
 

Sam Hain

Honorable
Apr 21, 2013
366
0
10,960
60
If it can show a CONSISTENT 50% performance gain over my existing rig (4790K/Z97) with/in games, I'm in.

If not, I'm quite happy where I'm at.
 

markjohnstone3721

Prominent
Sep 27, 2017
3
0
510
0
" I never seen Intel release two CPU architecture in the same year almost in the same fiscal year."

Don't forget the phantom launch of xeon-w. If that wasn't a reaction to AMD, I don't know what would be.
 

Beebstar

Honorable
Nov 13, 2013
13
0
10,510
0
Wow! Intel is doing it again. Why don't companies like this learn from their past mistakes. To be honest, I actually prayed for AMD. I like Intel's processors, but I don't get the impression that Intel's "leadership" have the consumers' best interest in mind. I'd have to guess that they are all about money or perhaps prestige. I wonder if they ask themselves, "Just how much money can we make off of people who make $15 an hour? Suckers!"

Here's another thing. When motherboard manufacturers have to keep switching designs, I'm not sure they take the time to perfect their current line-up. When you look at motherboard reviews, very few have consistently high ratings, and the failure or glitch rate seems ridiculous.

I guess I've ranted enough for one comment. Maybe someone at Intel will read this. Who knows!
 

havana.ag

Prominent
Sep 27, 2017
1
0
510
0
Using Intel only since 10 years. 7700k and z270 now.
But it's time to switch, what a greedy *. Cya Intel.
 

nitrium

Distinguished
Jul 27, 2009
1,459
12
19,665
195
If AMD's Ryzen had better turbo single thread performance (i.e. have a single thread turbo of ~5GHz) they would have already won this year's CPU war. As it stands, you're still going to get the best general "day to day" performance from Intel's lame/lazy CPU releases given that most tasks utilise just one or two cores. If AMD had focused just a bit harder on single thread performance (the IPC is there, but clock speed is lacking) my next PC build would be a no-brainer.
 

Cromwell__

Prominent
May 31, 2017
47
0
560
12
* like this makes me want to buy Ryzen. Then I think about how awesome my Rift will run on the 8700k and I buy Intel
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator

Broadwell-S (socketed version for desktop) and Skylake launched two months apart: Broadwell in June, Skylake in August.
 

dalauder

Splendid
And people wonder why there are AMD fanboys? One company tries to support consumer needs and future plans and the other could care less so long as they've got the money.

There's no way I can recommend Intel nowadays. Sure, they might be a little faster for some applications, but in a couple years when programming matures, Ryzen IPC will probably catch up. AND you'll be able to upgrade to a great new Ryzen processor for only $200. If you want Intel at that point, you'll need to spend $300 on the CPU and $200 on the motherboard (or wait 6 months more for mainstream chipsets).

$300 more for equal performance while also feeling like you got shafted isn't something I'm into. That's also why I'm still running an i7-2600K though and will get Ryzen when my Sandy Bridge stops feeling adequate.
 
"And Here is Why" You never said why. I am an Intel owner and I have owned a lot of Intel products. But I am very disappointed by the removal chipset compatibility. It is a money grab and there are not any other arguments (and here is why). If it were a power delivery issue with the 6 core parts, then the i3's would run just fine on the 100/200 series chipsets because they are just 7500s. Very disappointing and I am strongly considering purchasing an AMD product for my next CPU.
 

jdwii

Splendid


Your money but that is kind of a big task haha 50% boost over a CPU upgrade. You do have a great CPU though it should last you a few more years.
 

IInuyasha74

Distinguished
Moderator
The extra cores do seem like a wise move. I almost wish I was ready for an upgrade. I'm still on the Ivy Bridge i7-3770K though, and it still fast enough to me. The only times I ever want more speed is while compressing large amounts of files, but that doesn't happen every day. Looking forward to Ryzen II though, I'll probably be ready then.

As for the motherboard bit, it could be that the changes made to the Z370 chipset increase energy efficiency at various load levels. A 4W TDP increase for an extra two cores is remarkably small. Although, it might just be a push for more $$$.
 

vinay2070

Distinguished
Nov 27, 2011
62
2
18,645
2
Intel gets to sell new chipsets and motherboard companies get to sell new motherboards. Win-win for both of them. They know that customers will anyway shell out money!
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator

People who need a new PC will need a new PC regardless of what AMD or Intel do and that's where the bulk of sales are. Also, most people are skipping many generations in-between and will need a new motherboard even if platforms' lifespan were extended by a year or two.

Before singing praise for AMD, I'd wait to see how many of Zen 2's new or updated features will require a new motherboard. Backward compatibility could turn into a Pyrrhic victory if most people for whom backward compatibility is relevant end up feeling like they need a new motherboard for their new CPU to work as intended anyway.

With a growing number of people stretching their PCs for 5+ years, backward compatibility seems well on its way to becoming a niche concern.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS