Question No connector for extra case fan

May 23, 2019
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Hello,
I got my PC up and running today however I have 2 case fans and only one connector on the motherboard. Is this correct and if so is there a way around this?
Gigabyte H310M S2H 2.0
(Sorry couldn't attach image)

Thanks
 
Without having full specs on your fans, I suspect strongly that each consumes less than 0.5 A at max. Thus you can use a simple SPLITTER like this

https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812423160?Description=coboc fan splitter&cm_re=coboc_fan_splitter-_-12-423-160-_-Product

to connect two of them to the only SYS_FAN header you have. I am presuming that both case fans are of the same basic design (both 3-pin, or both 4-pin) and thus will be controlled properly with this signal sharing connection. That Splitter of 4-pin design will work for both thyes of fan.
 
May 23, 2019
5
0
10
0
Without having full specs on your fans, I suspect strongly that each consumes less than 0.5 A at max. Thus you can use a simple SPLITTER like this

https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812423160?Description=coboc fan splitter&cm_re=coboc_fan_splitter--12-423-160--Product

to connect two of them to the only SYS_FAN header you have. I am presuming that both case fans are of the same basic design (both 3-pin, or both 4-pin) and thus will be controlled properly with this signal sharing connection. That Splitter of 4-pin design will work for both thyes of fan.
Yeah both my fans are 4 pin connector
My Case Fan
^^^ This is my fan here
I will order the splitter.
Thanks
 
I will warn you that sellers mis-label Splitters and Hubs, in my view. And usually Splitters are cheaper since they are simpler. My way to classify is based on electrical function, not appearance.

To me, a SPLITTER has one "arm" ending in a female (with holes) connector that plugs into a mobo male (with pins) header, and two or more output "arms" each ending in a male connector to plug in your fans. It has NO other "arm: types. It merely connects all of its fans in parallel with the same shared mobo header signals. All power for the fans must come from the mobo header, so it is subject to the header's normal limit of max 1.0 A current to all fans connected to that one header. It may appear to be just a collection of "arms" or maybe as a small printed circuit board. It may be designed for either 3-pin or 4-pin fan systems, but either type will work for 3-pin fans.

A HUB is a different device. It may also be a collection of "arms", a board, or a closed box with ports along the side. It is always a 4-pin design. It distinguishing feature is that it has one "arm" of a third type ending in a connector that must plug into a power output (either SATA or 4-pin Molex) from the PSU. This device gets all power for its fans from the PSU and none from the host header, so it avoids the 1.0 A max limit of the header. But (with a very few exceptions) this device can ONLY operate if its host header is actually using the new PWM Mode to control fans, AND the fans you use with it also are of the 4-pin design. It distributes to its fans the PWM control signal on Pin #4 of the host header and the fixed +12 VDC power supply on Pin #2, and relies on the fan to be able to use that PWM signal to control its speed. Thus it can NOT be used with 3-pin fans.

If you have any 3-pin fans, you are best to use Splitters with them (mindful of the current limit of the header) and ensure that the header uses the older Voltage Control Mode (aka DC Mode). If all your fans are of the 4-pin design, then you CAN use a 4-pin fan SPLITTER if you fit within that 1.0 A limit. Or you can use a HUB which can handle more fans and can supply more power from the PSU if you have a lot of fans. In either case, when using all 4-pin fans, configure the header to use the newer PWM Mode. As I said, for a few fans you may find the Splitter to be the cheaper option.
 

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